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D 5007 0M6b36T 1 

California Slate Library 



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INDEX-VOLUME NINETEEN. 

SEPTEMBER 27, 1905— SEPTEMBER 19, 1906. 



Title 



No. Page 



Accidents on Railroads 6 11 

Accidents at Sea 23 10 

Accidents (Lakes), Regarding 42 2 

A. G. Ropes, Voyage of the 41 3 

Age Limit, Another 9 3 

Agreement Tor 1906 (Lakes) 28 8 

Alaska, Hatcheries In 30 5 

Alaska and Australia, Gold of 34 10 

Alaska, Transportation in 36 7 

Alcoholism Declining 42 10 

Alien Seamen Landed 52 3 

Allotment, Chamberlain on 30 6 

Alpine Tunnel, Another 52 5 

Aluminum Paper 12 8 

Amber, Composition and Source of 41 11 

American Federation of Labor — 

Appeal For Aid (San Francisco Fire) ... 34 7 

' ' Bill of Grievances, "The 28 1 

Campaign Programme 47 1 

Convention Call 2 2 

Convention, The 8 6 

Convention, Proceedings of 9-1; 10-1; 11-1 

Executive Council's Decision (Seamen- 
Longshoremen) 1 6 

New Thought in 18 1 

Seamen, Federation Supports 11-2; 11-6 

American Merchant Marine 12 3 

American (N. Y.) on Subsidy Bill 24 6 

American Fisheries, Value of 25 10 

American Boats, Seizure of 35 3 

American Beef 47 3 

Americanized Mongolians 37 10 

Anchors, Folding 35 8 

Anniversary, The Sailors ' 24 1 

Anti-Strike-Breakers Bill 23 8 

Anti-Seasick Bed, An 38 3 

Anti-Shanghaiing Law 43 7 

Anti-Injunction Bill, The 51 6 

Appropriations By Congress 8 11 

Arbitration, Compulsory 4 6 

Arbitration In New York 45 11 

Arctic Mail Delivery 13 5 

Army (U. 9.), Desertions From 4 11 

Asia Minor, Germany In 36 9 

Atlantic Seamen Act on Bills 22 6 

Atlantic Liners, Speed of 49 2 

Atlas, Cruelty To Seamen On, 44 5 

Australian Notes ("The Commodore") .... 

3-2; 12-9; 15-7; 21-2; 24-2; 

27-10; 30-2; 33-2; 36-2; 39-2; 43-10; 46-10; 51-2 

Australian Labor Press (Tom Lauder) 3-1; 14-7 

Australian Labor In Politics (History "As 

She Is Wrote ") 5 6 

Australia-Canada Line 14 2 

Australia, The Label In, 17 7 

Australia and Alaska, Gold of 34 10 

Australian Shipping Ideas 37 2 

B 

Baltimore Dock Fire 40 3 

Benefits, Trade-Union 1 1 

Benefits Paid By Trade-Unions 8 14 

Bergen, Commerce of 35 11 

Berlin, Population of 12 13 

Bermuda, The Island of, 40 11 

Berwind, Henry A., Mutiny on 5 15 

Bill Stokes, His Poem ("The Doctor") ..16 2 

Bills, Atlantic Seamen Act On, 22 6 

births and Deaths 38 2 

Bluejackets, Our 4 3 

Bluejackets Play Ball 47 3 

Bombay, Labor In 47 10 

Bookbinders In Saxony 17 2 

Boycott, China 's Right to 24 6 

Boycotting, Origin of 25 . 9 

Breakers Ahead 16 3 

Breeches-Buoy On Ship 29 9 

British Trade-Union Congress 4 1 

British and German Ships 5 2 

British and Irish Emigration 5 2 



Title No. Page 

British Postoffice 8 2 

British Contraband Carriers 9 10 

British Trade-Union Congress (Fraternal 

Delegate Mosses ' Address 15 1 

British Merchant Seamen 17 1 

British Fishing Industry 21 10 

British Exclusion Act 27 5 

British Tonnage Sold 36 5 

British Ships, Foreigners on 38 2 

British Shipping Bill, New 38 5 

British Crew Spaces 38 10 

British Vital Statistics 41 5 

Bucko, A Would-be (Barkentine Kolhala) . . 29 6 

Bulletin Hits It Again 47 7 

Burial by Contract 50 6 

Bury the -Maine 26 2 

Byron 's First Speech 24 2 

C 

Cables, Testing Cunarders ' 42 11 

Canada-Australia Line 14 2 

Canada-New Zealand Line 30 7 

Canada 's Fisheries 34 11 

Canada and Niagara Falls 35 9 

Canadian Immigration 1 8 

Canadian Merchant Marine 3 '5 

Canadian Trade-Union Congress 8 1 

Canadian Fishing Industry 17 5 

Canadian Line, Boats for 23 8 

Canadian Town, Promising 35 8 

Canadian Line, Fast 47 3 

Canadian Parliament 52 11 

Canal, St. Mary 's, Traffic 8 8 

Canal, Ship, New 17 3 

Canal Muddle, The ^ 19 10 

Canal ' ' Slaughter-House, ' ' The 22 7 

Canal, The Suez 26 2 

Canal, Eight Hours on The 26 10 

Canals in France 29 2 

Canals, Electricity for 33 2 

Canal, Cape Cod 34 3 

Canal Receipts, Suez 39 2 

Canal Project, Another 42 3 

Canal, Erie-Ohio- River 47 8 

Canal (Suez), Aged Pilot 47 11 

Canal (Panama), Slavery on the 48 6 

"Canned Willie," Balk at 39 3 

Cape Cod Canal 34 3 

Cape, Race to the 39 3 

Cape Cod to Buzzard 's Bay 41 3 

' ' Capital ' ' Defined 12 10 

Cargo Records, Lake 1 8 

Catholics, Population in the United States.. 17 11 

Centennial, Seizure of 5 5 

Chamberlain on Allotment 30 6 

Channel Tunnel, English 47 5 

Checkerboard Romance, A 48 11 

Child Labor, Etc.— 

Child Labor 5 3 

Child Labor and the Schools 6 7 

Child Labor Law Valid 18 6 

Child Slavery 25 3 

Child -Labor Law (Cal.) Upheld 43 6 

Children, Employment of 4 2 

Chilean Merchant Marine 49 15 

Chinese, Japanese, Exclusion Of, Etc. — 

Asiatic Schools, Vancouver 18 2 

By Order of the President 10 6 

Canadian, Mines, Chinese in 1 2 

Casson on Chinese 18 2 

China 's Right to Boycott 24 6 

Chinese Must Not Come 6 7 

Chinese in New York 20 5 

Chinese Exclusion 23 3 

Chinese Butcher, The Gentle 24 10 

Chinese and Japs, Arrivals at San Fran- 
cisco 46 7 

Chinese in South Africa 50 11 

Chinese in Samoa 52 11 



Title No. Page 

Competition, More Jap 12 9 

Coolie in the Woodpile 29 2 

Emigration, Japanese 1 3 

Exclusion, Times on 9 3 

Exclude the Japs at Home 13 6 

Exclusion, Labor Solid For 17 6 

Exclusion, Gompers on 26 2 

Exclusion Act, British 27 5 

Exclusion League, Work of 33 6 

Exclusion, Principles of 34 6 

Foster Pro-Chinese Bill 21-1; 22-1; 22-6 

Hawaii Becoming Japanized? Is 14 6 

Hissing Episode, The 16 6 

Jap, The Spreading 24 2 

Japs, McKinlay (Representative) and ... 1 7 

Japs, Exclude The 15 7 

Japan, Wages In 22 5 

Japanese Colonization 14 3 

Jenks on the Chinese 19 7 

Mongolian Servants 6 3 

Mongolians, Americanized 37 10 

President 's Mania, The 33 6 

Pro-Chinese Bill, Foster 21-1; 22-1; 22-6 

Race Problem in Hawaii 30 1 

Roosevelt Insults the West 29 6 

Seamen, Mongolian, ("The Doctor").... 8 7 

Speech That Was Hissed, The 16 1 

Taft on Exclusion 7 3 

Chinese In Canadian Mines 1 2 

Chinese, Casson on 18 2 

Chinese, Jenks on the 19 7 

( 'hurch And Labor 5 7 

Church And Workingmen 41 11 

Cigarmakers and Consumption 35 - 10 

Circulation, Per Capita, in United States, 8-4 ; 16-11 

Citizenship, Supreme Court on 26 6 

City Front Federation (Seamen Resign 

from) 39 6 

' ' Class Legislation " 17 3 

Clergyman 's Conversion, A 14 3 

Cleveland, Dry Docks at 43 8 

Climate, Effect of Sea Upon 51 3 

Coal in Spitzbergen 14 2 

Coal, The World's 24-5; 43-10 

Coal Mines, Fatalities In 46 11 

Coal Mining, Submarine 49 5 

Coal in French Colony 51 5 

Coast, Old Times on the ("The Doctor").. 3 2 

Coast, Wrecks on the 3 6 

Coast, Wages on the 32 4 

Coast Fisheries 52 2 

Cocoanut Growing 40 10 

College Men on the Lakes 36 8 

College-Bred Unemployed 47 10 

Colon Harbor 50 2 

Colonies, Farm 10 3 

Colonization, Japanese 14 3 

Commerce of Philadelphia 36 3 

Commerce of New York 40 3 

Compass, Substitute for the 4 2 

Compass Correction 36 8 

Compass, Did Chinese Discover? 42 2 

Compass, Vagaries of the 52 2 

Compulsory Arbitration 4 6 

Compulsory Arbitration (New Zealand Sea- 
men 's Award) 27 1 

( 'ompulsory Arbitration Again 46 6 

Conference, Lake Seamen's 21 8 

( 'onfession of Mutineer 44 3 

Congress, British Trade-Union 4 1 

Congress, Canadian Trade-Union 8 1 

Congress On Insurance 8 5 

Congress (U. S.), Appropriations by 8 11 

Congress, Miners ' 46 2 

Congress, Californians In 51 1 

Constitutional Government ^ranted to Rus- 
sians 7 13 

( ii', i raband, Seamen a.id 1 5 

Contraband, British Carriers 9 10 

Contraband, Wages ami 23 5 

Cook 's Experience, A 5 2 

Cooks ' (Lake) Convention 24 8 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME NINETEEN. 



Title No. Page 

Cooks' Agreement, 1906 (Lakes) Ss9 8 

Co-operative stores, German 50 10 

( topper, Increased Output of 47 11 

Corruption, National 9 3 

Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, Etc. — 

Consuls Have Jurisdiction Over Wages ..44 5 

Decision, A Just 18 3 

Master and Seaman, Fellow-Servants.... 5 5 

Seamen and Contraband 1 5 

Shipowners' Liability 27 7 

Wages and Contraband 23 5 

Courts Martial (U. S. Navy), record of 5 15 

Craft, Strange 29 5 

Crew Spaces, British 38 10 

< iews, For More Efficient 80 6 

Crews, Need of Efficient 26 1 

Crews, Shower Baths For 30 9 

Crimp, Seaman Acquitted of Murdering 40 5 

Crimps, Mobile, Active 49 3 

Crimping in Mobile (X. II. Leder) 46 3 

Cuban Labor Question 20 10 

Cunarders, Building New 36 3 

D 

Danish Merchant Marine il 9 

Day Lost or Gained 17 2 

Dead-Leter Law, A 15 3 

I toad Letters, Number of 21 4 

Death Harvest, Lakes 13 8 

Deficit, Postoffice Department 9 4 

Democracy in the Mess 2 3 

Derelicts, Destroying 7 3 

Desertions from United States Army 4 11 

Desertions, Naval 5 3 

Detroit River Tonnage 32 5 

Dewey, U. S. Drydock, Arrives at Philippines 

45 15 

"De Worl' Do Move" 8 6 

Diamond Trade, The 22 5 

.Disappearing England 49 11 

Disarmament, Japan and 51 10 

Discovery, Important 24 10 

Disinfectant, Tobacco as a 36 2 

Dividends, Wall Street 16 4 

Dock, Largest on Lakes 48 11 

JJouma, After the 50 11 

Drink Bill, Germany 's 30-13 ; 34-10 

Drinking Forbidden 51 11 

Drydock, Towing Big 6 5 

I Irydoeks at Cleveland 43 8 

Drydock 's Long Voyage 49 11 

Dyers ' Strike in Saxony 3 5 

E 

Earthquake in San Francisco — See under 

San Francisco 

Earthquake Insurance 37 11 

Efficiency, Unions and 17 10 

Efficient" Crews, For More 20 6 

Eight Hours In England 2 2 

Eight-Hour Day Wins (U. S. Battleship 

Connecticut) 2 7 

Eight Hours on Isthmus 7 3 

' ' Eight Hours, ' ' Here and There 12 6 

Eight Hours on the Canal 26 10 

electricity for Canals 33 2 

Electricity, Launching by 49 3 

Elephant 's Feat of Memory 26 9 

Elephantine Electricity 35 11 

Eleven Days, No Food For 39 3 

Eliot. "Lamoirin," 18 7 

Eliotism, A Case of 3 3 

Emigration, British and Irish 5 2 

Emigration From St. Pierre 20 10 

Emigration of Labor 25 10 

Employers ' Liability 50 8 

Employes, Public, Rights of 5 1 

Employers and Labor Laws 1 3 

Employment of Children 4 2 

"Employment Bureau, Free" 21 6 

England" Disposes of Old Ships 38 11 

a ad, Disappearing 49 11 

England, Trusts In 51 5 

England, Food Scarce In 51 11 

Engineers, Navigators Or 8 3 

Engineering Feat, Naval 35 11 

Engines, Ocean Turbine 20 2 

English Channel Tunnel 47 5 

Englishmen, Idle 39 5 

Erie-Ohio River Canal 47 8 

Europe, Few Millionaires In 38 2 

' ' Euthanasia " 24 3 

Exclude the Japs 15 7 

Exclusion, Taft on 7 3 

Explosive, Vigorit, New 19 5 

F 

Facts About New York 5 5 

Farm Colonies 10 3 

Fatalities In Coal Mines 46 11 

Female Labor 43 11 

Fiction, The Sailor of 25 3 

Firemen 's Affairs 5 3 

Fishermen's Protective Union — 

Fishermen 's Call for Unity 20 10 

Hospital For Fishermen 7 6 

Peterson, William, Death of 29 5 

Fisheries- 
Alaska Salmon Pack, 1905-06 46 5 

Fish, Shipping Live 45 11 

Fisheries, English 1 2 

Fisheries, Value of American 25 10 

Fisheries, Canada 's 34 11 

Fisheries (Wash.) To Protect 46 11 

Fisheries, Coast 52 2 

Fisheries, Norwegian 52 10 

Fishermen, Hospital for 7 6 

Fishermen, Greek, In Florida 33 2 



Title No. Page 

Fishermen, Newfoundland 39 11 

Fishermen's Hospital, The 16 6 

Fishermen's Insurance, Iceland 45 11 

Fishing Boats, Motor 3 3 

Fishing Industry. Canadian 17 5 

Fishing Industry, British 21 10 

Pishing Act, Foreign 36 2 

Fishing Progress, Japanese 50 5 

Hatcheries In Alaska 30 5 

Hospitals, Save the 15 6 

Sound Fisheries, The 2 6 

Florida, Greek Fishermen In 33 2 

Food Scarce In England 51 11 

Foreign Salute, First 50 3 

Foreign Traue, Our 50 10 

Foreigners On British Ships 38 2 

France, Canals in 29 2 

France, Labor Troubles in 46 11 

France, Strikes in 52 11 

French Ship Subsidies 22 2 

French Line, New 25 8 

French Match Monopoly 40 11 

Fresh Water At Sea 16 5 

' ' Friends, ' ' Our Reverend 24 3 

' ' Friends, ' ' Our, Heard From 30 3 

G 

Galley, A Growl From the 13 9 

Gas-Engines For Large Vessels 36 11 

Geese, On the Subject of 44 6 

German and British Ships 5 2 

German Workmen, Wages of 10 5 

German Shipping, Value of 18 15 

German Labor Insurance 24 10 

German Navy, Inefficiency of 36 2 

German Seamen 's Dispute 36 10 

German Seamen, Strike of 37 

German Rag Industry 42 2 

German Seamen Insured 45 5 

German Co-operative Stores 50 10 

Germany, Cost of Living In 2 5 

Germany, Toy Trade of 3 2 

Germany, Labor in 18 5 

Germany, Population of 27 13 

Germany, Labor in 34 10 

Germany, Low Wages in 35 5 

Germany in Asia Minor 36 9 

Germany, Strikes in 38-11; 42-7 

Germany, Suicide in 38 11 

Germany's Maritime Interests 52 10 

Germany 's Sailor Machine 6 5 

Germany 's Liquor Bill 30-13 ; 34-10 

Giant Waves 6 3 

Gold Shipments from Yukon Territory .... 4 4 

Gold In Madagascar 15 7 

Gold of Alaska and Australia 34 10 

Gold, Italians Gleaning 51 10 

Gompers on Exclusion 26 2 

Government Work, Slavery on 51 8 

Great Britain, Strikes in 4 5 

Grosvenor's (Representative) Trip 10 6 

Gun, The Man Behind the 12 3 

H 

Haakon VII (of Norway) Crowned 40 12 

Half, Captain Hank, Death of 42 15 

Hamburg, Shipping of 9 15 

Harbor of Keiuge (Lakes) 17 8 

Harbor, Colon 50 2 

Harmony, More, Needed ("The Doctor"). 9 7 

Hauger Outrage, The 48 3 

Havre, Harbor of 34 11 

Hawaii, Kace Problem In 30 1 

Heligoland Disappearing 14 9 

High-Speed Ships 43 5 

History "As She Is Wrote" (Australian 

Labor in Politics) 5 6 

History, Events in Russia 's 12 5 

"Homes," Trade-Union 21 8 

Hospital, The Fishermen 's 16 6 

Housing Poor in Milan 37 5 

Hudson Bay, Wheat From 'it 11 

Hudson 's Tricentenary 39 3 

Hull, Shipping of 27 10 

Humbugs in Type 10 3 

I 

Ice, Four Years On 40 11 

Iceland, Motor Boats In 42 2 

Iceland Fishermen's Insurance 45 11 

Idleness, Insurance Against 14 5 

Illiteracy in United States 11 4 

Illiteracy In Russia 14 2 

Immigration, Canadian 1 ' 8 

Immigration Evils 5 3 

Immigration Problem, The 7 1 

Immigration Problem, Our 13 3 

Immigration Policy, Our 26 3 

Immigration, Mexican 43 11 

Immigration In 1906 52 11 

India, Labor In 39 11 

Industrial Competition 37 5 

Injunctions — 

No Property Rights In Man (Furu- 
seth's Remarks On Anti-Injunction 

Bill) 34 1 

Injunction Extended 43 11 

Injunction Foint, New 46 3 

Injunction Martyrs 46 3 

Insurance, Trade-Union 1 1 

Insurance, Congress On 8 5 

Insurance Against Idleness 14 5 

Insurance By Workingmen 21 10 

Insurance, German Labor 24 10 

Insurance, Workingmen 's 35 11 

International Seamen's Union of America — 

Convention Call 3 7 

Seamen 's Work in Convention 14 6 

Seamen In National Conclave 12-1; 13-1 

Seamen 's Home, National 15 8 



Title No. Page 

Ireland, Statistics of 20 2 

Irish and British Emigration 5 2 

Isthmus, Eight Hours On 7 3 

Italian Labor Legislation 38 2 

Italians Gleaning Gold 51 10 

Italy, Labor In 1 2 

J-K 

Jap Competition, More 12 9 

Japan and Disarmament 51 10 

Japan 's Merchant Marine 34 11 

Japanese Emigration 1 3 

Japanese-Russian Peace Treaty 3 13 

Japanese Casualties in War 4 13 

Japanese War Expenses 20 13. 

Japanese Fishing Progress 50 5 

.lapanizeu, Is Hawaii Becoming 14 6 

Jack Puts It Up to 'Em ("The Doctor") 7 5 

Journalism, Seamen 's ' 8 6 

Kearsarge Accident, The 34 8 

King Christian IX, Death of 20 13 

L 

Label In Australia, The 17 7 

Labor In Italy 1 2 

Labor Laws, Employers and 1 3 

Labor Day Cup (San Francisco), Won by 

Sailors ' Union of the Pacific 2 1 

Labor Press, Australian 3 1 

Labor Statistics, New York 4 3 

Labor, Church And 5 7 

Labor, No Property In (Anti-Injunction 

Bill) 7 2 

Labor, New Zealand 8 5 

Labor Solid For Exclusion 17 6 

LaDor In Germany 18 5 

Labor and Reform 19 3 

Labor Question, Cuban 20 10 

Labor Insurance, German 24 10 

Labor, Emigration of 25 10 

Labor United In Protest (Moyer, Haywood 

and Pettioone) 28 6 

Labor in Germany 34 10 

Labor Losses, San Francisco 35 2 

Labor Council Speaks Again (Union Labor 

Party) 37 6 

Labor Legislation, Italian 38 2 

Labor In India 39 11 

Labor, ± emale 43 11 

Labor Troubles In France 46 11 

Labor In Bombay 47 10 

Labor Day Reflections 49 6 

Labor Day Press 51 7 

Labor Planks In Platforms 52-1; 52-7 

Laborer, Life of a 29 2 

Labrador a Peaceful Land 34 10 

Lake Seamen's Union — 

Death Roll, 1905 16 8 

Lake Seamen 's Conference 21 8 

Lake Cooks' Convention 24 8 

Lakes Agreement for 1906 28 8 

Lumber Carriers' Agreement, 1906 30 8 

Lake Cargo Records 1 8 

Lakes ' Death Harvest 13 8 

Lakes, Wheelmen on the 26 8 

Lakes, College Men on the 36 8 

Lake Liners, Machinery On 37 3 

Lake Ports, Leading 38 8 

Lake Wreckers, Frizes for 39 8 

Lake Tonnage. Growth of 40 8 

Lake Strandings, Many 48 8 

Lakes, Largest Dock On 4S 11 

Lake Liners, Lengthy 51 8 

"Lambkin" Eliot 18 7 

Law, A Dead Letter 15 3 

Law of Naturalization 20 7 

Launching By Electricity 49 3 

Legal Advice Agencies 7 2 

' ' Legislation, Class " 17 3 

Letter-Writing, World 's 38 11 

Lighthouse, New Kind of 32 8 

Light Under Water 40 10 

Life-Savers, Tug Men as 9 8 

Life-Saving Service, Work of 11-11 ; 12-5 

Life-Savers, Our 14 8 

Life-Savers, More Pay For The 17 7 

Life-Savers, New Rules For 29 9 

Liner, Race For Swiftest 44 5 

Liners, Atlantic, Speed of 49 2 

Liquor Bill, Germany 's 30-13 ; 34-10 

Littlefield'a Victory (?) 52 6 

Living, Cost of 1 10 

Living, Cost of in Germany 2 5 

Lloycl 's, Origin of 35 3 

Lockout, The Water-Front 38 1 

Log-Raft, Loss of 33-5; 34-5 ; 38-5 

London, Smoko In 42 5 

Longshoremen and Seamen — 

A. F. of L. Decision 11 2 

Executive Council's (A. F. of L.) "De- 
cision " 1 6 

Federation (A. F. of L.) Supports Sea- 
men 11 6 

San Francisco A Free Port 3 6 

Seamen 's Case Proved 6 6 

Seamen 's Case Sustained 10 6 

►jeamen and Longshoremen, Case Reviewed 

6 1 

Seamen and Longshoremen 27 8 

Seamen and Longshoremen (Erie Confer- 
ence 31 2 

Longshoremen (Pacific Coast) to Meet .... 26 5 

"Loss" of Ship 45 10 

Lumber, Record For Loading 15 5 

Lumbermen's Agreement (S. F.) 28 10 

Lunacy in London 13 8 

M 

Machinery on Lake Liners 37 

Madagascar, Gold In 15 



J. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME NINETEEN. 



Title 



No. 



Mail Delivery, Arctic 13 

Maine, Bury The 26 

Man Behind The Gun, The 12 

Manila, A Cry From 18 

Manning Scale, The 18 

Manning System (Shipowners "Stand 

Pat"; 29 

Marine Marvels, Modern 41 

Marines, Told to the 21 

Maritime Exposition 50 

Maritime Interests, Germany 's 52 

Match Monopoly, French 40 

McGuire, Peter J., Death of 24 

McKinlay (Bepresentative) and the Japs.. 1 

McNeill, George E., Death of 35 

Memory, Elephant 's Feat of 26 

Menace, New, To Niagara 50 

Merchant Marine, Canadian 3 

Merchant Marine, Danish 11 

Merchant Marine, American 12 

Merchant Marine Officers 32 

Merchant Marine, Japan's 34 

Merchant Marine Chilean 49 

Merchant Marine In War 51 

Merchant Seamen, British IV 

Mexican Immigration 43 

Mexico, Norway and 35 

Mexico, Bussians In 48 

Milan, Housing Poor In 37 

Military Expenditures 43 

Millionaires, Few in Europe 38 

Mines, Chinese In Canadian 1 

Miners ' Congress 46 

Money, Circulation in United States 8-4; 

Mongolian Seamen ("The Doctor") 8 

Mosses ' Address, The 15 

Moriturus Te Salutat ("The Doctor") 10 

Motor Fishing Boats 3 

Motor Boats In Iceland 42 

Mobile Crimps Active 49 

Muddle, The Canal 19 

Municipal Ownership 36 

Mutineer, Confession of 44 

Mutiny on Henry A. Berwind 5 

N 

Naval Desertions 5 

Naval Authorities Disagree 13 

Naval Dress Beform 18 

Naval Construction, New 28 

Naval Architects, Value of 29 

Naval Engineering Feat 35 

Navy (U. S.) Courts Martial 5 

Navy Estimates 12 

National Corruption 9 

' ' National Seamen 's Home " 15 

Nationality of Seamen 12 

Naturalization, Law of 20 

Navigators or Engineers 8 

New York, Facts About 5 

New iTork 's Water Traffic 6 

New Y ork City, Property of 7 

New Zealand Labor 8 

New York, Chinese In 20 

New Zealand-Canada Line 30 

Newfoundland Fishermen 39 

New York, Commerce of 40 

New York, Arbitration In 45 

New England, Wages In 49 

New York- Argentine Line 52 

Niagara, Plans For 35 

Niagara Falls, Canada and 35 

Niagara, New Menace to 50 

Nobel Prize, Award of 15 

Nome, Situation At 9 

Norway, Election of King Haakon VII.... 9 

Norway and Mexico 35 

Norway 's Paper Industry 35 

N orwegian Fisheries 52 

Northwest Passage 17-15 ; 



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25-10 



Ocean Line, New 18-2 ; 22-2 

Ocean Turbine Engines 20 2 

Ocean Waves, Height of 27 9 

Ocean Palace, An 34 5 

Old Boats (Lakes), Future of 42-8; 43-8 

Officers Made to Order 9 6 



"Open" and "Closed" Shop — 

' ' Open-Shop ' ' Dream, An 12 

' ' Open Shop ' ' Decision, An 42 

Union Shop Affirmed 17 

Ore Sales For 1906 15 

Overcrowding on Ships, Penalties Imposed.. 30 

Overloaded Ships 21 

Overtime Clause (Lakes) 30 

Oystermen (Maryland), "Bed Eecord" Up 

to Date 14 



Pacific Mail Company 's Annual Beport 

Padrone Graft 

Palace, An Ocean 

Panama Canal, The 

Panama Canal, Expenditures on 

10-11; 11-4; 12-4; 14 

Paper, Aluminum 

Paper Industry, Norway 's 

Parliament, Canadian 

Passenger Service, New 

Passengers, Fines Imposed for Carrying 

Without License 

Pendleton, A Joke on Mr 

Pensions, Figures On 1- 

Penny Postage, Universal 

Peru, V anadium In 

Philadelphia, Commerce of 

Philadelphia, Wireless At 

Pilot, Aged Suez Canal 

Pilots and Salvage 

Plain Dealer, Double Dealer 



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Title No. Page 

Platforms, Labor Planks In 52 1 

Poem, Bill Stokes, His ("The Doctor").. 16 2 

Pole, Drifting Across The 27 8 

Politicians, Defeat of the 17 6 

Population of New York City 7 4 

Population of Berlin 12 13 

Population of Catholics in United States. . 17 11 

Population of Germany 27 13 

Port, Building A 33 9 

"Poor, Poor Jack" 19 3 

Poorly Paid Men 48 3 

Post, The, and the Seamen 19 6 

Postage, Bates of Foreign 40 11 

Postoffice, British 8 2 

Postoffice Department Deficit 9 4 

Press on Arbitration, The 41 6 

Press, The, on The Strikes 46 1 

Press, Muzzled German 49 10 

Protection and Wages 1 3 

Protection, Seamen Demand (' ' The Doc- 
tor") 14 9 

"Protest," A Poor (Moyer, Haywood and 

Pettibone) 29 7 

Public Employes, Bights of 5 1 

Public Opinion 12 8 

R 

Badium, Discoverer of 37 11 

Bace, Zenith of Beached 14 2 

Bace For Swiftest Liner 44 5 

Baces, Progress of The 46 5 

Bag Industry, German 42 2 

Bailroads (U. S.) Accidents on 6 11 

Bailroad Over the Sea 28 5 

Bailway Accidents 13 8 

Bailways of the World 14 5 

Bailways, Facts About 43 10 

Bailway Signals, New 52 2 

Record Pasages — 

Coos Bay-San Francisco 45 5 

Great Britain-San Francisco 30 5 

Philadelphia-Cavite (P. I.) 27 5 

Portland (Or.) -San Francisco 30 5 

Port Ludlow-Santa Bosalia 34 5 

San Francisco-Puget Sound 25 5 

San Francisco-Queenstown 30 5 

San £ rancisco-Sydney 30 5 

San Francisco-Cape Flattery 46 5 

Sydney- Victoria 33 5 

Tacoma-Queenstown 40 5 

Yokohama-San Francisco 2 5 

Yokohama-Honolulu 33 5 

Yokohama-Cape Flattery 36 5 

Eecord In Shipbuilding 9 8 

"Bed Eecord" Up To Date (Maryland 

Oystermen) . . 14 1 

Beform, Labor and 19 3 

Eeverend ' ' Friends, ' ' Our 24 3 

Bomance, A Checkerboard 48 11 

Bubber Production 34 11 

Eussia, Illiteracy In 14 2 

Bussia 's History, Events In 12 5 

Eussian War Expenses 41 5 

Bussians, Constitutional Government Grant- 
ed To 7 13 

Bussians In Mexico 48 5 

S 

Sabbath Laws, Character of 49 10 

Sailor Machine, Germany 's 6 5 

Sailor of Fiction, The 25 3 

Sailors ' Home, Land For 37 3 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific**- 

Alliance, Tactics Of 38 6 

Answer to Shipowners ' Ad 47 6 

Arbitration Eef used 39 6 

Association 's Eeply, The 37 6 

End In Sight, The ' 50 6 

Events of Three Months 50 1 

Everything Is Lovely 46 7 

Float and the Cup, Sailors ' Union in La- 
bor Day Parade 2 6 

Furuseth, Dictator ! 43 1 

Comment of The Press 

39-2; 40-2; 41-1; 43-2; 

44-11; 45-2; 46-2; 47-2; 48-10; 49-2; 50-2 

Correspondence in the Case 44-1 ; 48-2 

Kelner, Murder of Comrade 39 6 

Kelner, Funeral of Comrade 40 6 

Labor Day Cup Won by Sailors ' Union . . 2 1 

Lockout In San Pedro 49 6 

Mayor Urges Arbitration 40 1 

More Police Wanted 47 6 

Murder By the Association 40 6 

"Nothing to Arbitrate" 41 1 

Old Story New Moral 45 1 

Pass the Honors Around 25 6 

Proof of the Plot, The 42 1 

Sailors ' Anniversary, The 24 1 

Sailors' Sixth, The 25 1 

Seamen and Longshoremen LocLet Out. . 38 6 
Seamen Sever Affiliation (City Front Fed- 
eration) 39 6 

Shipowners Won't Arbitrate 38 6 

Shipowners Still Bluffing 42 6 

Shipowners And The Mayor 48 1 

Shipowners ' Bluff Called 48 6 

Sixth of March Programme 23 7 

Sixth On the Coast, The 26 7 

Star Speaks Out, The 48 7 

Strike, Progress of the 39 1 

Tactics of the Association 41 6 

Undermanning Proved 44 6 

Victory For Seamen Assured 43 6 

Wages On the Coast 32-4; 37-1 

Wanted, American-Born Flies 45 6 

Water-Front Lockout, The 38 1 

Word to the Wise, A 45 6 

DECEASED MEMBEES 

Abrahamson, Emil 7 5 



Title No. Page 

Acker, Martin Alphonse Van 38 7 

Ahistedt, Pontus 20 5 

Andersen, Anton Emil 27 5 

Andersen, Hjalmar 40 7 

Andersen, John 24 5 

Anderson, John Axel 3 5 

Anderson, John 3 5 

Anderson, Adolph 5 5 

Anderson, Edwin 26 5 

Anderson, John 26 5 

Andersson, August P 36 7 

Andersson, Alfred 38 7 

Antio, Mikel 37 7 

Backstrom, Fred 32 2 

Bergersen, Stephen 19 5 

Bichon, Pierre 15 5 

Booth, A. J 10 5 

Boulby, James 24 5 

Braun, Ernest Gustaf Otto 38 7 

Brown, Peder 46 7 

Busch, L 20 5 

Cameron, James 22 5 

Carlsen, Eeinhart 20 5 

Carlsson, Carl Oscar S 28 5 

Carter, James 2 5 

Devanna, Jesse F 27 5 

Duhs, E 37 7 

Erickson, August 48 7 

Gonzalos, Paul 18 5 

Goslin, William 35 7 

Hagan, Martin 52 7 

Halvorsen, Martin 11 5 

Hansen, Harry 3 5 

Hansen, Einar 35 7 

Heggland, Andreas 3 5 

Hermann, Alex 51 7 

Horris, Augustus 16 5 

Janson, Fred 52 7 

Jensen, Jens Peter 22 5 

Johansen, Olaf 2 5 

Johansen, Alex Eobert 28 5 

Johansson, August 16 5 

Johnson, Albert 20 5 

Jonasen, Jonas 41 7 

Kelner, Andrew 39 7 

Kerkhoff, D 9 5 

Kraft, Haakon, W. F., 6 5 

Kraft, Julius 39 7 

Lennan, John Lloyd 5 5 

Linden, Carl A 26 5 

Lindvig, Peter 6 5 

Lyster, Arne 49 7 

Malinen, Henry Johan 6 5 

Mary, Joseph 8 5 

Mattson, Leonard 26 5 

Megewske, Johan 35 7 

Melander, E 15 5 

Michaelsen, Hans 6 5 

Montgomery, James 20 5 

Neithardt, Henry 52 7 

Nilsen, Carl Ossian 13 5 

Nilsson, Nicanor 26 5 

Norberg, Carl M ^ . . 6 5 

Nylund, August /*. . 4 5 

Olavesen, Sven Adolph 15 5 

Oleson, Fred 28 5 

Olsson, Theodor Nicholas 17 5 

Olsson, Gunnar Lorense 20 5 

Olsson, Olaf 27 5 

Olsson, Johan 39 7 

Osland, Henry 20 . 5 

Peterson, Hans 6 5 

Peterson, Percy J 12 5 

Peterson, Joseph 36 7 

Einaman, A. H 48 7 

Eussell, George 35 7 

Salmon, Frans Nestor 52 7 

Sandall, O. F 47 7 

Schimmeck, William 4 5 

Schultz, Alexander 46 7 

Segar, John Emil H 5 

Seglem, Lauritz L 10 5 

Shields, Thomas 35 7 

Sluys, Wilhelm von der 35 7 

Stevens, G. L 17 5 

Swei, John 30 5 

Syversen, Harold 3 5 

Thomsen, Thomas 5 5 

Thormer, Andreas Camilio 13 5 

Wahlgren, Axel 51 7 

Warta, Arthur 39 7 

Williams, John George 20 5 

Woodcock, Fred 28 5 

Wulfs, David 47 7 

Zerbst, William 28 5 

Salvage, Pilots And 41 3 

Salute, First Fireogn 50 3 

Samoa, Chinese in 52 n 

San Francisco Earthquake and Conflagration- 
Appeal for Aid (A. F. of L:) 34 7 

Debris, Amount of 33 4 

' ' First Things First " 35 6 

Friends, Thanks to Our 32 4 

General Situation, The 31 % 

Governor Pardee 's Message 31 3 

Human Kindness 31 4 

Insurance Eisks, Amount of 45 4 

Labor Council on Eecord 31 2 

Labor In San Francisco 32 1 

Labor Losses 35 2 

Normal, To Eestore the 52 6 

"Panic," Eegarding the 31 3 

Pressing Needs of the Hour 35 1 

Problem of Wages, The 33 1 

Belief Funds 33-4 ; 47-4 

San Francisco In Euins 31 1 

Union Eecords (Sailors' Union) Safe.... 31 2 

Union Eules Ee-established 34 6 

Work, Not Charity 35 6 

Saxony, Dyers ' Strike in 3 5 

Saxony, Bookbinders In 17 2 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME NINETEEN. 



No. Page 

Saxony, Trade Schools In 18 2 

Scandinavian Water Power 16 2 

Schools. Child Labor and the 6 7 

LSI and Sailor 42 6 

Scotland, Vagrancy In 39 11 

Scotland, Shipbuilding In 49 5 

Sealers, Bill Introduced for Relief of 13 5 

Sea. Fresh Water at 16 5 

Sea. Accidents at 23 10 

Sea, Railroad Over the 28 5 

Sea Story, A i Eva I 47 3 

of Upon climate 51 3 

Seamanship, Tests in 21 3 

Seamen. Nationality of 12 S 

Seamen Demand Protection ("The Doctor") 14 9 

Seamen, British Merchant 17 1 

ad sui. si. lies 

L6-7; 19-1; 19-6; 21 6; 23-1 : 2:: t'.; 27-6 

Seamen and ship 29 3 

Seamen. Strike of German 37 7 

Seamen Insured, German 45 5 

Seamen, Tin SI I 49 8 

a, Alien. Landed 52 3 

Seamen 's Journalism 8 6 

o's Dispute German 36 10 

Seamen's Bights in Public 50 6 

, Prevention of 21 5 

Seattle Times an. I the Seamen 20 6 

Seaweed, Importance of 19 2 

Seizure of American Boats 35 3 

Shanghaied From Florida 45 3 

Shetland Ponies 22 10 

Ship Subsidies - 3 

Ship Canal. New 17 3 

Ship, Naming a 42 11 

Ship, '■ l.nss- of 45 10 

Ships, British ami German 5 2 

Ships, Overloaded 21 2 

Ships, England Disposes of Old 38 11 

Ships, Highspeed 43 5 

Shipbuilding, Record In 9 8 

Shipbuilding For the Year 47 3 

Shipbuilding In Scotland 49 5 

Shipping of Hull 27 10 

Shipping Ideas. Australian 37 2 

Shipping Bill. New British 38 5 

Shipping Live Fish 45 11 

Shipping Tonnage. World's 47 5 

Shipowners "Stand Pat" (Manning Sys- 
tem) 29 1 

Shij. wrecked Men Deserted (''The Doctor") 4 7 

Shorter Workday, The 17 3 

Shower Baths for ( Yews 30 9 

Signals, New Railway 52 2 

Simplon Tunnel, < >pening of 25 9 

Single Tax Is " It" 7 6 

Situation At Nome 9 6 

"Slaughter House, " The Canal 22 7 

Slavery In South Africa 11 5 

Slavery, child 25 3 

Slavery On The ( anal 48 6 

Slavery On Government Work 51 8 

Slocum's Master, Trial of 20-3; 20-6 

Smoke In London 42 5 

Socialistic Fallacies 8 3 

Society Bland. Lives Lost in Hurricane .... 30 5 

South' Africa. Slavery In 11-5; 50-11 

Speech That Was Hissed. The 16 1 

Speed of Atlantic Liners 49 2 

Spit/.liergen, Coal in 14 2 

Spreading .lap. The 24 2 

St. Mary's Canal Traffic 8 8 

St. Pierre. Emigration From 20 10 

Statistics, New York Labor 4 3 

ics of Ireland 20 2 

Statistics. British Vital 41 5 

Steam Without Fire 32 8 

Steamboat, New Type of 35 8 

Steamer Huns Street-Cars 36 5 

Steamship Enterprise 22 10 

Steel Structures Best 37 11 

' ' Stowaway ' ' 1 lodge, A 44 3 

Strandings, Many I>ake 48 8 

Strange Craft .' 29 5 

Stricken and Sold (San Francisco and Union 

Labor Party) 36 1 

Strike, Dyers' In Saxony 3 5 

Strike of Germs n Seamen 37 7 

Strike. The Street Carmen 's 49 1 

Strikes In Great Britain 4 5 

Strikes Analyzed 16 3 

Strikes In Germany 38-11; 42-7 

Strikes, Prevention For 42 10 

Strikes, The Press on the 46 1 



Title No. Page 

Strikes In Fiance 52 11 

Snl. ma rine Coal Mining 49 5 

Subsidies. Ship 2 

v Crab. The 18 3 

Subsidy Bill, New York American OH 24 6 

Subsidies, Seamen and 

16-7; 19-1; 19-6; 21-6; 23-1; 23-6; 27-6 

lies, French Shij. 22 2 

Suez I 'anal. The 26 2 

Suez ( 'anal Receipts 39 2 

Suez Canal. Aged Pilot 47 11 

Suffrage, Universal 12 lo 

Suicide in Germany 38 11 

Subsidies. Ship . ..' 27 3 

•hop Exhibit, A 40 10 

Switzerland By Steamer 36 11 

T 

nia, Development In 48 5 

Telegra phy, Wireless. Afloat 28 3 

Telemobiloskop, The 14 -5 

Telephone, Invention of the 7 7 

Ten-Thousand Tonners (Lakes) 39 8 

Tests in Seamanship 21 3 

Texas. End of the 46 3 

Textile Troubles 39 11 

Thomas W. Lawson. The 36 

Throne. The Petition to the ("Bill of Griev- 
es") 28 6 

' ' Times ' ' on Exclusion 9 3 

Tobacco As a Disinfectant 36 2 

Told to the Marines 21 3 

ige, Detroit River 32 5 

Tonnage. British, Sold 36 5 

Tonnage. World 's Shipping 47 5 

Tow-Barges, Profits In 6 6 

Tow-Barges Condemned 20 1 

Towing Big Drydock 6 5 

Toy Trade of Germany 3 2 

Trade Union Benefits ' l l 

Trade-Union Congress, British 4 1 

Trade-Union Congress) Canadian 8 1 

Trade-Union Funds 8 14 

Trade-Unions, Benefits Paid By 8 14 

Trade-Union "Homes" 21 8 

Trade-Union Policy 30 7 

Trade-Union League, Women 's 36 10 

Trade Schools In Saxony 18 2 

Training-Ship Proposed 4 7 

Transatlantic Wireless 47 11 

Trans-Isthmian Traffic 38 3 

Tra asportation In Alaska 36 7 

Transport workers (European) Meet 49 7 

Trusts in England 51 5 

Travel, Peril of 46 3 

Tricentenary, Hudson's 39 3 

Tug Men as Life-Savers 9 8 

Tunnel, English Channel 47 5 

Tunnel, Another Alpine 52 5 

Turbine Steamer, First Transatlantic 12 15 

Turbine Engines, Ocean 20 2 

Turbine, Operation of the 42 11 

U— V 

Unemployed, College-bred 47 10 

Union Label Criticism 25 6 

Union Labor Party 36-1 ; 37-6 

Unions and Efficiency 17 10 

Union Shop Affirmed 17 2 

United States, Illiteracy In 11 4 

Universal Suffrage 12 10 

Vagaries of the Compass 52 2 

incy in Scotland 39 11 

Vanadium in Peru 40 10 

Vancouver Asiatic Schools 18 • 2 

Vessels Laid Up (Lakes) 17 8 

Vessels, Gas Engines for Large 36 11 

Yigorit, New Explosive 19 5 

Volume XIX Coast Seamen's Journal 1 6 

W 

Wages, Protection and 1 3 

Wages of German W r orkmen 10 5 

E in Japan 22 5 

Wages, The Problem of 33 1 

Wages, Low, In Germany 35 5 

Wages, Must Raise 48 7 

Wages in New England 49 11 

Wall Street Dividends 16 4 

War Expenses, Japanese 20 13 

War Expenses, Russian 41 5 

War, Merchant Marine In 51 3 



Title No. Page 

Warships, Construction of 29 3 

Water Power, Si u 16 2 

Water. Fresh, at S.-a 16 5 

Water. Light Under 40 10 

Water Plants, Regarding 49 2 

( iianf 6 3 

Waves, Height, of Ocean 27 9 

Weighed and Found Wanting (Union Labor 

Party) 36 6 

ag Industry 4.3 10 

Wheat from Hudson Bay 37 1] 

Wheel, Six Hours at the 14 8 

men on the Lakes 26 8 

Whiteiish Disappearing 40 5 

Windjammer, Growth of the 22 3 

Wireless Telegraphy, Record 4 4 

Wireless Telegraphy Afloat 28 3 

9s at Philadelphia 40 3 

Wireless, Transatlantic 47 11 

Wreck, Old, Found 48 8 

Wrecking Vessels (Lakes), New 42 8 

Woman, A White 25 5 

Women's Trade-Union League 36 10 

Workday, The Shorter 17 3 

Workingmen, Insurance By 21 10 

Workingmen's Insurance 35 11 

Workingmen, Church and 41 11 

Workmen 's Houses, Modern 51 11 

Words of Good Cheer (Secretary Tregear, 

N. Z.) 36 6 

Workmen (German), Wages of 10 5 

World. Railways of the 14 5 

World 's Coal, The 24 5 

World's Letter-Writing 38 11 

World 's Coal Supply 43 10 

World 's Shipping Tonnage 47 5 

Wrecks — 

Advance 15 5 

Alameda 2-5; 2-7; 3-5; 4-5; 5-5 

Al.len Besse 24 5 

Aquidaban 19 13 

Argus 39 5 

Ariadne 21 5 

Bella 10 5 

Celia 50 5 

Centennial 29-5; 34-5; 40-5 

Challenger 17-5; 23-5 

Chehalis 47 5 

Cherokee, Reward of Captain Casto 21 11 

Corinthian 39 5 

Drumcraig 22-5; 25-5 

Garsdale (formerly Fort James) 10 5 

George W. Elder 22-5 ; 39-8 ; 42-5 

Gypsy 2 5 

Il'enrV B. Hyde 22 5 

Hilda" 9 11 

Jennie Stella 15 5 

Jennie Wand 17 5 

Kirkhill 4 5 

King David 18 5 

I -a fayette 12 11 

Loch Vennachar 2 11 

Manchuria 50 5 

Marion 44 5 

Newsboy 28 5 

Nicholas Thaver 41-5; 42-". ; 

Olga .' 36 5 

( llvmpian 35 5 

Pass of Mel fort 16 5 

Portland M 8 

Roanoke 3 5 

Sacramento 6 5 

Santa Barbara 5 5 

Sheridan 52 5 

St. Paul 3 5 

Stanley Dollar 4 5 

Swansea Castle 25 5 

Thistle 14 15 

Tricolor 2 5 

Valencia. Bodies Recovered from 19-5; 20-5; 

21-5; 22-5; 23-5; 26-5; 50-5; 52-5 

Volunteer 38 5 

W. H. Kruger 17 5 

Wrecks on the Coast 3 6 

Wrecks of the Year 16 2 

Y— Z 

Yukon Territory, Gold Shipments 4 4 

Yukon River Improvements 34 11 

Yacht Race, San Pedro-Honolulu 24-5; 29-5; 

36-5 ; 37-5 ; 40-5 ; 41-5 

Year, Wrecks of the 16 2 

Zenith of Race Reached 14 2 




for the seafaring people of the world. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



Vol. XIX. No. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 27, 1905. 



Whole No. 937. 



TRADE-UNION INSURANCE. 



Amount and Value of Benefits. 

Labor Commissioner Stafford Presents Figures. 



THE school history of a generation ago gave the 
student but a poor idea of the general con- 
dition of the people of the past. It gave 
glowing descriptions of the high lights of battle and 
strife, but scarcely touched upon the long years of 
patient, peaceful endeavor, suffering and toil incident 
to the clearing of a continent and the building of a 
nation. The education of the average citizen re- 
garding the labor union of to-day is along similar 
lines. He hears of the strike, the lockout and the 
walking delegate; he sees an occasional parade, and 
he vaguely wonders what it is all about, and whether 
it is worth while. 

It is my purpose to give you, briefly as possible, the 
facts concerning another phase of the work of labor 
organizations — a phase seldom alluded to, and but 
little understood. I refer to the modern tendency 
of organized labor to provide life insurance, and sick 
and accident benefits for its members. Twenty years 
ago, the pay-day at any large manufacturing estab- 
lishment, or railroad terminus, inevitably produced 
one or more subscription lists, started by the per- 
sonal friends of those in immediate need. Some- 
times the plea was in behalf of the widow or orphans 
of a man who had been suddenly killed by ears or 
machinery; sometimes for the entire family on ac- 
count of lingering sickness of the breadwinner. 
These appeals never failed to meet with a hearty 
response, and were frequently supplemented by a 
substantial contribution from the employer. The 
steady increase in, the demands made this method un- 
satisfactory from every standpoint. The appeal to 
the workers became monotonously regular and insist- 
ent, while the aid to the needy was necessarily, in the 
individual case, but temporary and insufficient. 

The more thoughtful members of the national or- 
ganizations began to advocate the substitution of a 
system of compulsory life insurance for the previous 
temporary relief. This met with the approval of the 
membership generally, and also naturally evolved sim- 
ilar arrangements for sick, accident and funeral bene- 
fits; and there has been up to the present a steady 
:ind consistent growth along these lines, with results 
that are astonishing in their magnitude. No doubt 
••very member of a labor union is fully conversant 
with the provisions of his own organization, but few 
men, however, are familiar with the conditions in all 
organizations. It is my purpose to give you definite 
and positive figures regarding life insurance, and 
other benefits provided for by the labor organizations 
of the State of California. 

1 have been able to obtain the positive figures show- 
ing the number who carry insurance, etc., and the 
amount carried, from an incomplete State un'on mem- 
bership of 84,450 members. No attempt lias been 



made at this time to estimate the total union mi m 
bership of the State, nor the complete life insurance 
figures. I merely give the results deduced from the 
data already on hand. 

The following divisions are made along the lines 
adopted by the officials of the Federal Government in 
their Census Reports, and may not exactly accord 
with the divisions followed by the unions them- 
selves. 

We find in personal and domestic service 15,535 
members, carrying $1,1.99,250.00 life insurance, and 
9,042 of these members have a provision for relief in 
ease of sickness and accident. 

In the printing trades, 3,497 members, with $291,- 
670.00 life insurance. 

In the iron trades, with 10,035 members, 8,723 have 
provided an insurance of $1,026,210.00, and 5,580 of 
these members arc provided for during sickness or ac- 
cident. 

In the clothing and kindred trades, with 2,520 
members, 760 have provided life insurance amount- 
ing to $52,965.00, and 1,435 have provided against 
sickness and accident. 

In the building trades, 21,834 members carry a life 
insurance of $2,814,630.00, and 16,559 of these have 
made provisions for sickness and accident. 

In manufactures not otherwise specified, with a 
membership of 2,605, 1,856 carry insurance of $205,- 
800.00, and 1,002 provide for sickness and accident. 

The teamsters, longshoremen and warehousemen, 
with a membership of 7,792, have 7,392 members 
carrying $596,500 of insurance and 4,705 members 
earrying sick and accident benefits. 

In the stationary engineers and firemen, with 1,275 
members, 965 provide $72,375.00 life insurance, and 
310 of these members insure against sickness and 
accident. 

In sea transportation, with a membership of 9,211, 
there is life insurance amounting to $690,825.00, and 
insurance against shipwreck of $397,330.00. In sick- 
ness these men are provided for by the United States 
Government. 

In the land transportation organizations, 8,958 
members carry $8,999,950.00 of insurance; 3,216 of 
these provide against sickness and accident, and 
3,128 provide their own hospital. 

In mercantile pursuits, out of 1,242 members, 
1,157 provide $113,700.00 in insurance. 

Of the woodworkers and kindred trades, with 1,196 
members, 1,151 provide $61,100.00 of insurance, and 
786 provide sick and accident benefit. 

The totals show that 36,638 members of labor or- 
ganizations in this State have provided against sick- 
ness and accident in specific amounts, ranging from 
$3.00 to $7.00 per week, averaging over $5.00 for 
each member per week. Besides these, 6,403 have 
pledged themselves to take care of their sick in no 
specific amount, but in keeping with their needs; and 
3,128 have voluntarily provided hospital accommoda- 



tions for sick and injured members, making a total 
who take care of their sick and injured of 46,169. 

Twelve thousand seven hundred and eight 
members have provided insurance in case of 
death of wife. Many of the organizations 
have provided the same payment in case of total dis- 
ability as of death, and organizations representing 
12,208 members have provided total disability bene- 
fits in excess of the death benefits; 4,465 members 
have a superannuation benefit; 2,111 have a home for 
aged and infirm members; 1,041 have a similar home 
proposed. The seamen have shipwreck benefits rang- 
ing from $30.00 to $75.00 per member, and one or- 
ganization has an insurance against loss of tools. 

Of the 84,458 unionists considered, 69,133, or over 
81 per cent, have made provision for death benefits 
ranging from $40.00 to $4,500.00, and averaging about 
$250.00 per member, showing a total of life insurance 
policies issued by labor unions in the State of Cali- 
fornia of upward of $17,000,000.00. 

Taking into consideration the fact that this is an 
incomplete statement of insurance carried in this 
•State, and that it is nearly all provided for through 
national organizations, undoubtedly a somewhat sim- 
ilar average would obtain throughout the United 
States as a whole, which will give a total Labor 
Union Insurance amounting to the enormous sum of 
$600,000,000.00 for the nation. 

The criticism is often made that assessment insur- 
ance of fraternal bodies lacks the stability and sound- 
ness of what is ordinarily called ' ' Old Line Insur- 
ance. " Without any desire to comment unfavorably 
upon other forms of insurance, I suggest for your 
consideration that if you should increase your pre- 
miums in order to obtain a large surplus reserve, and 
should arrange to pay to Gompers of the Cigar 
Makers, Mitchell of the Mine Workers, Stone, Clark 
and Morrisey of the Railroad organizations, and Dun- 
can of the Granite Cutters, $100,000.00 per annum 
each, as presidents of the insurance departments, in 
lieu of the modest salaries they now receive, and al- 
low each of them to surround himself with a Board 
of Directors at $20,000.00 per annum in payment for 
their services in handling your surplus, you would be 
strictly up to date in the insurance world. I doubt, 
however, whether your insurance would be of more 
real value than at present. 

But, seriously, without any consideration concern- 
ing the stability, or the reverse, of either assessment 
or "Old Line " insurance, I wish to call your atten- 
tion to a fact not generally taken into consideration 
in estimating the value of labor union protection. 
A man usually learns but one trade. He enters into 
this as his life occupation, and does not change it ex- 
cept through stress of extraordinary circumstances. 
The same tie that binds him to his trade binds him to 
his organization. His union is along natural lines, 
and ordinarily a man will not leave his union any more 
than he will change his trade. When, on account of 
his necessities, he is constrained to provide against 
the time when his work will either temporarily or per- 
manently cease, he enters his whole trade — his means 
of livelihood — as an asset in his insurance company. 
No temporary inconvenience will cause him to sep 
arate himself from the benefits of his union, and in 
this rests the stability of the form of insurance we 
are considering over all other. 

The continued growth of this phase of the labor 
union places its membership more squarely before tho 
vyorld as willing to fight its own battles and bear its 
'inn burden in peace time as well as in' war. The 
man wno, through his organization, gathers his fam- 
ily around him, turns his back upon the relief officer 
and the poorhouse, and voluntarily assumes all of his 

financial burden, is entitled to, and will receive, the 

admiration and respect of the entire nation, 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



English Fisheries. 

The following striking figures as to the im- 
portance of the fishing industry in England 
are taken from the official report for l!)0o. 
They give the value of all kinds of fish landed 
in England and Wales, and the number of 
men and boys employed in the business. The 
value of the fish was over $35,000,000, and the 
business gave employment to 11,539 persons. 
For some years there was a steady decline 
in the number of first-class sailing trawlers. 
That was arrested in 1903, though the fall in 
the average tonnage continued. As there was 
a slight increase of first-class steam trawlers, 
whereas the number had been stationary in 

1901 and 1902, this would appear to show a 
confidence on the part of owners in the con- 
tinued prosperity of the industry. This is 
accentuated by the fact that the average ton- 
nage of the steam trawlers is increasing. In 

1902 there were 1,096 first-class steam trawlers 
with an average tonnage of 56.3; the follow- 
ing year there were 1,135 with an average ton- 
nage of 57.3. There were 822 lirst-class sail- 
ing trawlers in 1903, an increase of 15, but the 
average tonnage Eel! from 40 to 39.1. "Sail- 
ers" are not likely to become obsolete. The 
report states that owing to economic condi- 
tions (such as price of coal, etc.) and the dif- 
ferent kinds of fishing apparatus employed 
the respective spheres of operation of steam 
and sail will always be more or less sharply 
defined. Steatm is uow employed on the larg- 
er "sailers" for hauling work in the manip- 
ulation of trawl and sails, and by the adop- 
tion of auxiliary motor power, to be used on 
occasions when sails are unavailable, the posi- 
tion of sailing-trawlers is likely to be still fur- 
ther strengthened. It is estimated that 9,721 
vessels were employed in the fisheries in 1903, 
ranging from the large Iceland steam trawler 
to the small open rowing boat, and 1,457 were 
propelled by steam, 6,911 by sails, and 1,353 
by oars. The steamers, with very few excep- 
tions, use an otter trawl, adapted for fairly- 
level, smooth ground, and workable in deep 
water; the "sailers" use the beam trawl, 
which is not usually employed below a mod- 
erate depth, but can be used when required on 
rough and sloping ground. There are "ordi- 
nary" steam trawlers, to the number of about 
1.000, which fish a.s far away as Faroe, Ice- 
land and the Hay of Biscay, and land their 
own iish ; and there are "fleeting" trawlers, 
about 150 in all, which work together in large 
fleets on the same ground and send their fish 
to Billingsgate by special steamers known as 
•carriers." 

The tendency is to concentrate the fishing 
industry at a few ports. Of the first-class 
si earners five ports on the east coast — North 
Shields, Hull, Grimsby, Yarmouth and Lowe- 
stoft — have 1,214, or 83 per cent of the total. 
The points that determine choice of steam 
trawling centers are facilities for dock accom- 
modation, lowness of price and readiness of 
supply of coal and ice, and facility of access 
to Billingsgate and other centers of consump- 
tion. "Keen competition between rival ports 
in catering for the needs of this class of ship- 
ping may be expected, ' ' says the report, ' ' and 
may have a beneficial influence upon railway 
rates, and thereby on the price of fish to the 
consumer. ' ' 

For every foreign steam trawler engaged, 
or likely to have been engaged, in fishing in 
the North Sea, there were five from the North 
Sea ports of England alone. 

Vessels fishing by trawls and lines go far- 
ther and farther afield in search of new 



grounds. Grimsby sends about fifty-five 
steam liners and between sixly and seventy 
steam trawlers to Icelandic and Faroese 
grounds, while eighty steamboats from Hull 
also Iish off Iceland. 

Until some eight or nine years ago the 
trawlers limited themselves to the southeast 
side of Iceland, or at any rate did not go far- 
ther from home than to the Westmanna Isl- 
ands. This was owing partly to their limited 
coal-carrying capacity — the largest vessels 
then not exceeding 150 tons gross tonus 
and partly to the fact that fish were found in 
sufficient abundance to make the compara- 
tively short voyages remunerative. At the 
present time some of the vessels are of as 
much as 275 tons burden, and most are suffi- 
ciently large and well-equipped to permit of 
their circumnavigating Iceland, visiting the 
more distant waters, and fishing all the year 
round. Each vessel may make from twenty 
to thirty voyages a year, and may bring home 
from twenty to one hundred tons of iish per 
The catch consists of plaice, had- 
dock, halibut, ling, torsk, skate and cod. 
.Much Iish is now brought home and found to 
be salable, which was formerly regarded as 
valueless and thrown overboard, it being esti- 
mated that in the early days of the trade some 
50 per cent of the catch was thus rejected. 

There were landed at all stations in Eng- 
land and Wales during 1903 nearly 153,000 
tons of herrings. The average value per hun- 
dred-weight was $1.40, as against $1.50 in 
1902 and $1.74 in 1901. 

Herrings form the great bulk of exports of 
fish, and they go mostly to Germany. The 
wilue of exported herrings in 1903 was $11,- 
961,461, as against $14,277,911 in the pre- 
vious year, the fall being in values rather 
than quantities. It may be mentioned here, 
as showing the reputation enjoyed by the 
British salmon, that this Iish was exported to 
the value of $284,519 in 1903. 



Labor in Italy. 



Consul Dunning writes from Milan that 
the modifications of the law of June 19, 1902, 
governing the employment of women and 
children, recently brought before the Italian 
Chamber of Deputies, provide for new regu- 
lations which will be of interest in industrial 
America. The new regulations provide that 
children of either sex under 12 years will 
not be allowed to work in any factory or 
mine. This provision is practically extend- 
ed also to any trade. For admission to work 
in mines, tunnels, and so forth, children must 
have attained the age of 13 years where there 
is electric traction and 14 years where there 
is no electric traction; and women and girls 
an excluded altogether from this class of 
labor, regardless of age. 

In work of a heavy, unhealthy, or danger- 
ous nature, the new laws provide that no boys 
under 15 years of age shall be employed, or 
females under the age of 21. In Sicily, under 
certain circumstances, boys of 13 years will 
be allowed to continue in the employments 
where they are now engaged until July 1, 
1907, after which the age limit will be 14 
years under the conditions named above. 
Night work will not legally exceed nine hours 
out of any twenty-four, and in cases where 
night and day shifts are used the reliefs shall 
be made every eight hours. 

These new regulations indicate the amount 
of thought which is being devoted to an im- 
portant branch of social science by the Ital- 
ian Government. 



Chinese in Canadian Mines. 



Some time ago the British Columbia Parlia- 
ment enacted a law forbidding the employ- 
ment of Chinamen in mining underground. 
The Wellington Colliery Company, desiring to 
test this law, continued to employ < 'hinamen in 
underground work, whereupon an agreed case 
was submitted to the courts, and passed finally 
to the Privy Council in London, England, the 
court of last resort. The judicial committee of 
the Privy Council has handed down a decision 
in favor of the colliery company. The com- 
mittee sustained the contention of the company 
that it could send its employes to any portion 
of its property. Similar acts, relating to both 
Chinese and Japanese, have previously been 
disallowed by the Dominion Government; and 
in one case Downing street decided against a 
law very similar to the one just acted upon. 

This discussion has moved one of the Van- 
couver daily papers to comment editorially as 
follows : 

Taking this new decision into consideration, 
and knowing that any legislation which we 
may enact against the Japanese will be disal- 
lowed, the people here may well ask them- 
selves, is it worth while to continue to pass 
local legislation against Asiatics? It seems 
better to try a new tack, and that is to educate 
the rest of Canada up to the British Columbia 
view. We are moved to make this comment 
because it seems to us that at present British 
Columbia is kicking against the pricks. We 
may go on legislating session after session, we 
may go on inaugurating costly legal appeal 
after costly legal appeal, but the result will 
be the same — the Acts wdl be disallowed, the 
Province will lose the lawsuits and be mulcted 
in costs. It is obviously necessary that the 
present method of attacking obnoxious immi- 
gration and employment be changed or that 
our attitude against the Asiatics be modified. 
Which is it to be? The subject demands tin- 
deepest consideration. We know and we 
sympathize with the feelings of the working 
classes in this matter; at the same time, it 
appears absurd for the local Legislature to 
keep on passing bills which it knows can only 
live a few months. 



At the recent convention in Hamburg of 
the Coal Dealers' Association of Germany a 
number of delegates spoke on the practice of 
tipping and bribing. They complained that 
stokers and others having to do with coal used 
in manufacturing works and large establish- 
ments of any kind must be given bribe money, 
( r have their influence used against the coal 
dealers to prevent the securing of new orders. 
The delegates urged the necessity of taking 
u-es to abolish the nefarious practice. 
Americans traveling in Europe find the tip- 
ping abuse very annoying. The tipping evil 
has undoubtedly led to the bribery method 
which now has become so vexatious to business 

people. 



The Franconian Gardening Association, of 
Frankfort, Germany, last year inaugurated 
the presentation of flowers and plants in pots 
to the children of the public schools in order 
to instill a love for plant culture. This scheme 
has succeeded amazingly. Before the summer 
vacation commences the children produce their 
potted plants and flowers and such as merit 
approbation receive prizes. At the last school 
exhibitions of this kind held at Wurzburg 133 
children were awarded prizes for their efforts 
at plant cultui-e. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



XsXSXsXiXsXiXsXjX!^^ 



On tlie Atlantic Coast. 



(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions.) 

%(JX«X»X«X»Xg®(«X«XJ)®^^ 



Employers and Labor Laws. 



It has come to be almost a lav/ of nature 
that when the corporate employers of labor 
can not dispose of a labor measure in any 
other way, they will get busy dispatching it 
with their favorite coup de grace — having it 
declared unconstitutional by the courts. Also, 
when a labor bill is up for consideration by 
the lawmakers, the representatives of the em- 
ployers are certain to be on hand and de- 
nounce the whole thing as a deep-laid scheme 
of the unions to get the upper hand of the 
employers and "run their business." The 
organized seamen, for instance, have always 
been lammed good and plenty with this brand 
of argument when endeavoring to secure the 
passage of some bill intended to safeguard life 
and property at sea by providing that all ves- 
sels must be properly manned by a sufficient 
number of efficient seamen". It is, of course, 
highly desirable that there shall be as little 
governmental interference as possible with the 
businesses of private citizens and corpora- 
tions, but if governments are instituted for 
any one thing more than another it is for the 
protection of life and property. Hence, the 
trade-unions are simply performing an im- 
perative civic duty in insisting that laws shall 
be passed for the protection of life and -prop- 
erty, and be enforced; and the constant op- 
position of employers of labor to the passage 
of such laws, or to their subsequent enforce- 
ment, should brand them in the minds of all 
right-thinking men as enemies of society. 
This opinion, however, is not advanced here 
with the hope that it will be very generally 
accepted, for it is unfortunately true that we 
live in times when money covereth a multi- 
tude of faults for which a poor man would be 
sent to Coventry in short order. 

The foregoing sentiments are emphasized 
just now by the attempt of the anthracite 
coal-operators of Pennsylvania to have the 
anthracite miners' certificate law set aside on 
the ground of unconstitutionality. This law, 
as may be known, was passed by the PennsyL 
vania Legislature in 1897, and provides, in 
effect, that no man shall be allowed to work 
in the anthracite mines as a miner unless he 
has first worked two years as a helper and 
qualified for a miner's certificate. The in- 
tent of the law is, of course, to minimize the 
more than ordinarily great danger to life con- 
nected with coal-mining by having the work 
performed by expert miners. It would seem 
that no man worthy of a place next to the ad- 
jective "civilized" would have any objection 
to such a law, yet at this moment there is a 
hearing in progress before a notary in the 
Astor House, New York, instigated by the 
coal-operators for the purpose of taking such 
testimony from disgruntled miners as will en- 
able them to have the anthracite Certificate 
law declared unconstitutional upon the 
ground that it discriminates against bitumin- 
ous miners. The attorneys for the operators 
are present at the hearing gathering material 
for a test case, which has already been begun, 
and they express the greatest confidence in 
their ability to have the law nullified by the 
courts. It is intimated, indeed, that they have 
already received assurances to that effect 
from a quarter where cut-and-dried decisions 
are kept in stock for the friends of the con- 



cern. The ulterior object of all this activity 
on the part of the operators is to place them 
in a position on April 1, 1906, when their 
present agreement with the anthracite miners 
expires, to lock them out should they demand 
an increase of wages or a reduction of hours, 
and replace them with bituminous miners or 
pick-ups from the detention pen on Ellis Isl- 
and. No sort of consideration whatever is 
given to the increased danger to life which 
the employment of inexperienced men in the 
anthracite mines would to a certainty cause, 
and the whole business suggests that none too 
strong language is used in describing it as sor- 
did and contemptible. 



Japanese Emigration. 

Japan will soon have an ample outlet for its sur- 
plus population in Corea, which it proposes to develop, 
and the Government policy undoubtedly will be to 
turn emigration thither and keep Japanese labor under 
the Japanese flag, where there will be abundant em- 
ployment for it. — Milwaukee Sentinel. 

It is to be hoped that the Sentinel's conject- 
ure is right. It is much more likely, though, 
that the Japanese, if they emigrate at all for 
the purpose of obtaining employment, will do 
the same as other men; that is, they will go 
where they can get the most money for their 
labor. This being the case, Corea will have 
no special inducements for Japanese laborers, 
compared to those held out to them by cheap- 
labor-hunting contractors in the United States. 
Corea is fairly well peopled, and her coolies 
work even cheaper than do the Japanese or 
Chinese, and would, of course, determine the 
rate of wages for unskilled labor in that 
country. There does not seem to be much 
comfort, therefore, in the optimistic view of 
the Sentinel on the subject of Japanese emi- 
gration and immigration, and perhaps it was 
not specially meant to afford any comfort to 
those who know the real situation with regard 
to Japanese cheap labor in this country. It 
is much more probable that it was meant to 
reassure that very large class of citizens who 
are against Mongolian immigration on pas- 
sively general principles, and thus lessen 
whatever possible chances . there may be of 
turning them into active opponents of such 
immigration. 



Alfred G. Vanderbilt and wife were kept 
awake the other night by the "chug, chug" 
of a vulgar steam-drill, working in their 
neighborhood. The police were communicat- 
ed with, and requested to stop the "nui- 
sance, ' ' so that Mr. Vanderbilt and wife could 
woo "nature's sweet restorer" in the serene 
tranquility and ease to which they are habit- 
uated — and the "nuisance" was forthwith 
enjoined from breaking into the stilly night 
so long as Mr. Vanderbilt and wife elected to 
honor the neighborhood with their presence. 
The incident is mentioned here merely be- 
cause the procedure of the police in this in- 
stance was so much at variance with the 
usual "Ah, g'wan, or I'll fan ye" reception 
accorded the complaints of ordinary citizens, 
that a first-class text may be evolved from it 
by some unsophisticated young writer on 'that 
soul -stirring theme, "Human Equality." 



Frivolous arguments in a controversy are 
as dirt in the economy of Nature — matter out 
of place. 



Protection and Wages. 

The practically unanimous vote of the Brit- 
ish Trade-Union Congress against a protect- 
ive tariff proves that the British workers are 
not so easily fooled as are American working- 
men by the sophistries of Protection. It is 
very strange, too, that American workingmen, 
generally accounted the most intelligent in the 
world, should still submit to the legalized rob- 
bery of the many by the few, carried on under 
the guise of Protection. The only explana- 
tion of this seeming inconsistency is probably 
to be found in the fact that our protective 
tariff, by virtue of its long standing, has ac- 
quired some of that venerableness which is 
unconsciously associated with all long-estab- 
lished institutions. A high tariff simply bene- 
fits a few privileged interests by choking off 
competition in the particular commodities or 
staples which they trade in. It has no re- 
deeming features whatever, but several bad 
ones, chief of which is its indisputable tend- 
ency to increase the cost of living to the con- 
suming classes, which, of course, includes 
practically every citizen of the United States. 
The claim that a high tariff increases the 
wages of workingmen is one of the most ridic- 
ulous ever made, and is an insult to the in- 
telligence of workingmen. There is nothing 
whatever in our tariff laws that could possi- 
bly be construed as making it mandatory upon 
employers of labor to pay high wages or low 
wages, or any wages at all. Such being the 
case, common sense ought to prove to the sat- 
isfaction of any one interested in the subject 
that no normal-minded employer of labor will 
pay higher wages than he can get men to 
work for. The reason why wages in the 
United States are on an average higher than 
elsewhere is mainly because, thanks to the 
tariff, it costs more to live here. Organiza- 
tion among workingmen, with its educating 
influence in the direction of a high standard 
of living and a more advanced civilization, is 
also doing much to maintain a high wage- 
rate. It is, indeed, to be feared that were it 
not for the trade-union movement the living 
conditions of workingmen in the United 
States would be even worse than they are in 
Europe, for it is a well-proved economic fact 
that where the price of the necessaries of life 
is artificially enhanced by a tariff or other 
means the wages of labor are never propor- 
tionately advanced. For instance, while the 
cost of living in the United States has increas- 
ed fully thirty-three per cent in the last 
twenty years, the wages of unskilled labor 
have remained practically stationary in that 
period; and even with the help of organiza- 
tion the wages of skilled labor have not kept 
pace with the increased cost of living. The 
truth of the whole matter is that, while a high 
tariff undoubtedly protects capital, labor will 
still have to accept competitive market wages. 



Robert Doak, a member in good standing of 
the Atlantic Coast Marine Firemen's Union, 
died in Boston on September 8, and was 
buried by the Union. 



Corruption in the garb of respectability is 
the most insidious wolf that ever donned 
sheep 's clothing. 

(Continued on page 10.) 



coAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Home News. 



A new high record has been made in 
the sale of a seat on the New York 
Stock Exchange. One recently Bold 

brought $84,000. 

ogrese may be called upon to in- 
vestigate the question of Army supplies, 
us a result of the frauds uncovered at 
the Philadelphia Arsenal. 

An expected increase of 42,000 in at- 
tendance at New York's public schools 
is g striking indication of the big strides 
made in the population of thai city 

Sixty buildings were destroyed by fire 
at Nome, Alaska, on the night of Sep- 
tember 13, causing a loss now estimated 
to be in the neighborhood of $200,000. 

Controller (I routs of New fork lias 
announced that lie wants to ret is 
cause the salary of $15,000 a year at- 
tached to his office is inadequate for his 
needs. 

All work has been abandoned on Esqui- 
malt (B. C) fortifications. Before the 
defenses were taken over by Canada 

a law fort was planned, but will nol be 
constructed now. 

Judge A. (1. Dayton of the United 
Mates Court, at Wheeling, W. v., has 
given notice before the bench that he 
will rule in favor of the Chinese I 
forth in Exclusion Act cases. 

In an editorial in his paper, the Salina 
(Kan.) Journal, former Fourth Assist 
ant Postmaster-Genera] Bristow defends 
former Public Printer Palmer, declaring 
that Mr. Palmer is more •sinned against 
than sinning. 

Rain-in-the-facc, one of the hading 
chiefs in the Custer Massacre, and who 
is said personally to have killed General 
Custer, died at the Standing Bock Res- 
ervation, South Dakota, on September 
12. Be was 62 years old. 

The United States Government has 
just awarded a contract to the Driggs 
Seabury Ordnance Corporation, of Shar- 
on, l'a., for 17(i rapid-fire guns of dif- 
ferent sizes. The contract amounts ti 
several hundreds of thousands of do! 
lars. 

Brigadier-General J. M. Lee, com 
manding the Department of Texas, in his 
annual report recommends a eompul 
sory retirement law, similar to that oi 
the Navy and marine corps, and declares 
positively in favor of the re-establish 
ment of the Army canteen. 

Twenty-one American soldiers arrived 
in Dawson, N. W. T., recently wit hunt 
the proper means for being housed and 
fed while passing through Canadian 
territory. They were en route from 
Skagway to Port Gibbon on the lowei 
Yukon. 

An attempt to break Engineer Culm 
yei's record of llii minutes for the dis 
tance between Toledo and Elkhart, 133.4 
miles, was made by Engineer Ira Spark 
lin with the Lake Shore Twentieth < len 
tnry train, but failed, as Sparklin's timi 
was 119 minutes. 

It is sai.l that the Chinese Minister at 
Washington, 1). •'., has cabled his Gov 
eminent asking that it prevent Chi 

nese workmen from proc ling to tin 

United States in order to avoid possi 
hie maltreatment. The advices say that 
the Government declined to accede to 
the request. 

The State Department has been in- 
formed thai the Nicaraguajo court in Bee 

siun at dental has convicted William S. 
Albers, the American resident agent at 
Jalap, on the charge of resisting legal 
process and insulting President Zelaya. 

Sentence has not yet l n imposed, how 

ever. 

Four officials of the Schwangschild & 
Sulzberger Packing Company, of Chi 
eago, were fined an aggregate of $ 
by Judge Humphrey in the United States 
District Court at Chicago, on Septembt i 
21, on charges of conspiracy to accept 
railroad rebates. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BOYS, READ THIS 

Ami see now yi ome a property owner and make money by Invi 

a little of what vim earn every month. Don't get Into the habit of spending 

all you earn, lmi save up a little for a rainy day. San Francisco offered a 

did opportunity twenty years ago. San Pedro is the growing San Fran- 
cisco of the South to-day. Don't forget that. We offer you lots on graded 
streets with cement sidewalks and curbs, tn ed and watei d from 

to $450, at the exceptionally low ti ish and Jin per month 

until paid. Remember, by the time you have finished paying for your lot it 
will have more than doubled in value. Don't let this opportunity slip by, but 
see John Anderson, next door to the new postofl 

PECK & ANDERSON, San Pedro, Cal. 



BRILLIANTS 

CLOTH I NG STOR E 
SAN PEDRO. CAL. 

We make a Specialty of Handling only the Best Goods Manufactured 

for Seamen. 

YOU WILL FIND THE UNION LABEL ON OUB GOODS ALSO. 



LIPPHAN BROS. 

CLOTHING AND SHOE STORE 

We Carry the Finest and Most Up-to-date maKes 
of Union Made Goods 

WIEDWALD BLOCK, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD WINES AND 

LIQUORS. 

BOTTLERS OF SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES BEERS. 
All goods sold at lowest .San Franeiseo prices. 

We buy direct from Kentucky Distilleries and our California Wineries. 
Seafaring men invited to inspect our st 
Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



JOHN HELANDER 

Dealer in 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

Groceries, Provisions, Cigars 

Fourth Street, near Beacon, 
San Fedro, Cal. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drug's, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO, 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Fedro, Cal. 
era in 

CIGABS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

i .os Angel liner and all San 

Prancisi i i m Sale. 

Agents Hail. or Steam Laundry. 



C. L. MUNSON 

r in 

CIGABS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 
GIVE THE OLD .MAX A CALL. 

Front. Street, opposite S. F. Depot, 
SAX PEDRt >, CAL. 



UNION CIGAR AND 
TOBACCO STORE 

ELIAS WEBEBG, Proprietor. 

Front Street, Opposite S. F. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Union-Made Cigars, Tobaccos, pipes, 

Notions, Etc, 



J. P. SYLVA, Jr. 

Dealer in 

Groceries, Hay and Grain, also Green 

Fruits and Country Produce 

BEACON ST., bet. Fourth and Filth. 

Phone Xo. 164. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



CIGAR AND TOBACCO STORE 

JACOB OLSEN, No. 324, Prop. 

THE BEST CIGARS IN TOWX. 



Store on Fourth Street, near Beacon, 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SEASIDE MARKET 

CAPTAIN McVICAB and B. L. BAAND 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Beef, Pork, Mutton and Imm of all Hinds 

.Meats Inspected by U, S. Inspectors. 

FBONT STREET, SAN PEDBO, CAL. 

Vessels Supplied at Lowe I 
Telephone 203. 



FRED S VENDS EN 

UNION EXPRESS 

AND DRAY CO. 

STAND AT FRONT STREET 

SAN PEDBO, CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 
Undertaker and Embalmer 

FOURTH ST. 

Bet. Front & Beacon Sts.. San Pedro. 



When making purchases from our adver- 
tisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



PEOPLE'S BARGAIN STORE 

Headquarters for UNION HADE CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing- Goods, Boots and 

Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 

Outfits. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 

Ent., Front and Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 




UNION LABEL 



OP THE 



ITED HATTERS 



OF N. A. 



ZCjt ,. v i nen you , are buying a FUR HAT. elthe- soft or 
^£GlQTFRi>» : stI ». see to it that the Genuine Union Label Is sewed 
our edeeTevoiiv tvJ" !** The Genuine Union Label is perforated on the 
in his nossP^Ynn^^^i" 6 . as a P osta S. e stamp. If a retailer has loose labels 
oose lShlla fi *J?S ?, frers t0 put one in a hat for y° u - do not Patronize him. 
•'sine them tn nr,?l a L St ° r f s /3, re <=° u "<erfeits. Unprincipled manufacturers are 
f'n^L^^ r,, M de , r , t< l, Kf ' t rid of thelr scab-made hats. The John B. Stetson 
Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., Is a non-union concern. stetson 

lWAHTTw Ti-ro-rnn «, JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, W. J. 

MABTIN LAWLOB, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Boom 15, New York, N. T. 



LETTER LIST. 



SAN PEDBO, CAL. 

Absolonsen, ole M. Johnson, EmIl-1876 

liann, J. Johnson, Louis 

A ndersen-515 Jords n, C 

Andersen, A. B. Juhnky. William 

Andersen, Chas. G. Kahlstrom, C. 
Andersen, Joseph Karlson-859 
Andersen, Wilhelm Karlson, Uus. E. 
Andersson-727 Klahn. EC. 

Anderson. Olaf Knutsen, Knut 



Anderson, W. G. 
Anderson, Gen. 
Anderson, Gust. 
Anderson, S. 
Anderson, W.-993 
Andreasen, N. 8, 
Ansel beck. G. 
A ppi I s;ren, John 
Arkerlund-12G3 
A rut sen. Erik 
Augustln, A. L. 
Bakke, John-517 
Blierath, Mav 
Berggren. I 
Bergqvlst, J. A. 
Bcrntsen, O.-l 280 
I '-ear 

I .e Henry 



Krallman, Alfred 
Krietsamtn. Ferd. 
Krogstad, Eugene 
Ladelane, John 
Lnutler, John 
Larsen, Louis-53fi 
Larsson, Edw. 
Lavison, Henry 
I.ind, Aug. A. 
Linoholm, Nestor 
Lin gen. M. C. 
Lund, Charles-. r »99 
Lundgvlst, John 
Maatta. John 
Magnussen-1 1 IT 
Magnuson, C. 
Matthew, J. 
McAdam, J. 



Brandt, Win., pks MeHume, W. TI. 

Bratrud, O. M. McKenxie, Jas. T. 

Bregler, Frledrlch Meyer, Ernst 

Carlson, August Michael, Walter 



Carlson, Fred 
Carlson, Julius 
Carlson, J.-3S8 
Clausen, A. E. 
Bortram, Wm. 
Brandt. William 
Chamberlin. L. C. 
Cheodore. Bodlou 



Mlkkelsen-101 

Mikkelsson, Alfred 
Mjornes, Arne 
Nelson, Frank 

Nelson, Julius 
Nielsen, K. N. 
Nielsen, Mad. P. 
Nlelson, N. G. 



chrlstensen, Harry Nielsen, Niels Chr. 
Christiansen. Ludv. Nisson. James 
Christopherson, Nylund. John 



Carl 

Comerford. L. 
Danielsen. Ernst 
Oaring. C. 
Davey, C. 
niener. Alik 
Ihils. I. -547 
Ed son, Frank 
Eklund. W. G. 
Edlund. J. A. 
Ellason. K. A. 
Engelbrlght, H. 
Erikson. Auel A. 
Krlandsen-529 
Foldat, John 
Frandsen. F.-3R8 
Gibson. Chas. B. 



Oerterling. Emll 
Olsen. Erlk-726 
Olsen, Hans C. 
Olsen. John B. 
Oraff. L>. 
Pearson. Oskar 
Pedersen-1015 
Perouwer, G. 
Petersen. Chris. 
Petersen, O. 
Pettonen. K. H. 
Petterson. Auel 
Plerson. Robert A. 
Poulsen. M. P. 
Rasmussen, Adolph 

mussen, Edw. 
Rasmussen. Victor 



Cronvall. Johan F. Rear, Stephen A. 

Grunbock, Johan Redehman-f>n5 

Gunlach, John Reld, James-326 

Gustatfson, J.-432 Rjetad. S. J. -1355 

Oustafson, A. F. Rosenblad. Karl 



Gustafson. Oskar 
Gustavsen, Ben 
Hansen. Adolf 
Hansen, Andrew 
Hansen, A. G. 
Hansen, August 
Hansen. Chas G. 
Hansen. H. J. 
Hansen. J. 
Holtte. John 



Rudl. A. M.-677 
Samsio, S. 
Samuelsen. O. 
Randel. Louis 
Sandon-1579 
Sanltone. J. 
Saunders, Carl 
Simonsen. Alfred 
Smith, C. H. 
Smith, Pat. 



Hansen, J. P.-1381 Smith. Paul 
Hansen. Laurits Smltsh, H.-Reg 



Hansen, Theodo, 
Haraldsson-1 204 
Henriksen. K. 
Isaekson. G. E. 
Jarobsen. Peder 
.Tansson. A. -351 
Jansen, Fred-1281 



letter P. O. 
Sodergvlst. Otto 
Soderlund, Andrew 
Sorensen. Soren 
Staef. Lars. 
Stornes, And. O. 
Str.aehan. John 



.Tansson. Edward J. Strand. Ednar 

Jensen, Oluf Sunderman. Gustav 

Janson, Osear Svenssen. Hnns M. 

Jensen. Niels Olaf Svensson, Nlcolaus 

Jens. Otto Swanson, C. 

.Teshke. Hans Swansson. O.-l 31 6 

Johansen. E. H. Thorn. Edmund 

Johansen, E. W. Tomask. Math. 

Johansen, Geo. W. Verbrugge. D. 

Johansen. Gunen Verzona, Felix 



Johansen. Jorgen 
Johansen-1591 
.Tnhansson-1287 
Johansson-1204 



Westerholm. Aug. 
Wilson. Edward 
Wilson, P. L. 
Zugehaer, Alex. 



WHEN DRINKING BEER 


Mm 


^Niw^rcolta^ — 




^M 


<§H 


Of America rfcVv 

RADE MARK REGISTERED Sr^ . 1 


SEE THAT THIS LABEL 
IS ON THE KEG OR BOTTLE 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

James Thorburn, age about 22, 
recently Btaying at the Scandinavian 
Sailors' Home, San Francisco, is inquired 

for. Address. Coast SEAMEN '8 JOURNAL. 

.lames 1.. Russell, ;i native of Geneva, 
X. Y. ; last heard of about eighteen 

months ago, when going to Alaska, is 

inquired for. Address. Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 
Qeorge Jordan, a native of Germany, 
beard from in August. 1902, 
Port. Townsend, Wash., is inquired for 
i.v the German Consulate at San Fran- 
I !al. 
Benjamin tforais, supposed to be "ii 
the ship Henry Failing, is inquired for. 
Address, < 'oast Beau i \ai.. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






Pacific Coast Marine, 



X4&.^A^.^l 



\^<&^Z^^<^i- 



The Pacific Mail freighter Algna, may be chartered 
by the Western Fuel Company to ply in the coal trade 
between Comox and San Francisco. 

The British ship Glenalvon, last reported ashore at 
Saratoga Spit, near Yokohama, was towed into Eoyal 
Eoads, B. C, on September 22. 

The stern-wheeler H. J. Corcoran, for some time ply- 
ing between San Francisco and Vallejo and Mare 
Island, has been withdrawn, owing to lack of patron- 
age. 

The American steamer Barracouta, Captain Curtis, 
last reporteu to have sailed from San Francisco for 
Nikolaevsk, has been seized by the Japanese north of 
the island of Saghalien. 

A telegram reecived at San Francisco on September 
18 reported that the German ship Emilie, from 
Shields for Oregon, had put back to the Falkland Isl- 
ands on September 10, with her rigging damaged. 

Captain James H. Saunders, of the Pacific Mail 
liner Manchuria, surrendered his citizenship papers at 
San Francisco last week, but received them back again 
pending an investigation into his standing as a citizen. 

Attorney H. W. Hutton, at San Francisco on Sep- 
tember 14, bought the scow-schooner Madeline at auc- 
tion for $270. The vessel was sold by order of the 
United States District Court. 

The steamer Cottage City was towed into Nanaimo, 
B. C, on September 22, by the steamer Al-Ki, which 
found the Cottage City disabled. The Cottage City 
lost her tail shaft when bound to Seattle from Skag- 
way. 

A telegram received at San Francisco on Septeh- 
ber 18 from Honolulu announced that the American 
ship Mary L. Gushing, bound from Eleele for the 
former port, had put back to Honolulu leaking at the 
rate of six inches every twenty-four hours. 

The Pacific Mail liner Korea, having on board the 
Taft party, is expected to break the record between 
Yokohama and San Francisco on her present trip. 
The Korea is due at the latter port on September 27, 
ten days from Japan. 

Captain Daniel Graham, of Alameda, Cal., one of 
the oldest and most widely-known shipping men on 
the Pacific Coast, died at Astoria, Or., on September 
17 of heart failure. Captain Graham was about 69 
years of age, and a native of Scotland. 

The Oceanic liner Sierra, which sailed from San 
Francisco on September 21 for Australia, carried an 
exceptionally large shipment of more than 20,000 
cases of salmon, just arrived from Alaska, and all for 
New Zealand and Australia. 

Thirty-four vessels, representing a net tonnage of 
09,400 tons, are listed and en route for Portland, 
Or., for grain cargoes. It is the greatest amount of 
tonnage that has been headed for the Columbia River 
at this season of the year since 1902. 

Robert Franze, a seaman, began Libel proceedings in 
the United .States District Court at San Francisco on 
September 22 against the scow-schooner Tartar. 
Franze claims there is $95 due him as wages at $40 a 
month for labor performed on the Tartar. 

The schooner Corinthian, a lumber carrier of large 
capacity, recently fitted with two Standard gas engines 
of fifty horse-power each, made a trial trip on San 
Francisco Bay on September 21 and developed a speed 
of nearly eight miles an hour with her auxiliary power. 

The steam-schooner Del Norte, owned by Hobbs, 
Wall & Co., was damaged on September 21 by collision 
with a Southern Pacific barge in San Francisco Bay, 
while the steamer was bound from Oakland Creek to 
the city. No serious damage was inflicted, however, to 
either vessel. 

The steamer Buckman, built on the Lakes, and re- 
cently purchased by the Barneson-Hibberd Company 
for service on the Coast, is to leave New York on 
September 24 for San Francisco, by way of the 
Straits of Magellan, under command of Captain 
Milton Thwing. 

The British ship Beacon Rock, sailing recently from 
Liverpool for Victoria, has put back to her starting 
point, with her bulwarks damaged and some damage 
inflicted to her decks. Some of the ship 's boats were 
carried away, and a quantity of water that was ship- 
ped got into the hold. 

The seating-schooner Acapuleo, formerly the Car- 
mencita, was sold at Victoria, B. O, on September 
22 by the Marshal of the Admiralty Court to satisfy 
the claims of her crew. She was purchased by P. P. 
Brown, of Victoria, for $1,000, the amount claimed by 
her crew. 

It has been announced by General S. M. Mills of 
the United States committee on fortifications, which 
recently returned to Los Angeles, Cal., after an in- 
spection of the ports of the Pacific Coast, that ex- 
tensive improvements in the way of fortifications will 
lie made on (he Pacific Coasl iii (lie near future. 



'^i^i^.^i^^.*Z> 



i^S^S^S^^' 



The American ship Tillie F. Starbuck was reported 
on September 21 as having reached her destination, 
Delaware Breakwater, from Honolulu, after a passage 
of 154 days. The Starbuck had been posted as over- 
due, with a rate of 45 per cent for reinsurance, but no 
speculation resulted. 

The Italian ship Beecroft, 142 days out from Ge- 
noa for Iquique, and the British bark Glenmark, 
ninety-five days from Tocopilla for Port Natal, have 
been added to the reinsurance list. There are now 
six vessels quoted for reinsurance, the righest rate, 85 
per cent, being on the Lalla Rookh, 190 days out from 
Brisbane for Falmouth. 

The barkentine George C. Perkins, with a cargo of 
lumber from Gray's Harbor, arrived outside San 
Francisco in the fog, and came to an anchorage dan- 
gerously near the beach south of the Golden Gate life- 
saving station. Later, when the fog lifted, she was 
seen to be in a safe position, but the tug Pilot stood 
by, ready to offer assistance. 

A telegram received at San Francisco on September 
22 from Tokio reported that the Pacific Mail steamer 
Barracouta had been seized by the Japanese north of 
Saghalien Island. The Barracouta, under charter to 
the Barneson-Hibberd Company, left San Francisco on 
August 22, for Nicolaefsk, on the Siberian coast, with 
a cargo of 1631 tons of salt. 

Following is the re-insurance list, as posted at San 
Francisco on September 24: Italian ship Beecroft, 
140 days from Genoa for Iquique, 6 per cent ; British 
bark Lalla Rookh, 188 days from Brisbane for Fal- 
mouth, 90 per cent; British ship Principality, 144 
days from Junin for Rotterdam, 55 per cent ; French 
Bark Joinville, 151 days from New Caledonia for 
Havre, 10 per cent. 

Application to the Government of British Columbia 
for the arrest of Captain Alexander McLean of the 
notorious Carmencita sealing expedition, was made by 
the State Department of the United States on Sep- 
tember 16. McLean is ostensibly wanted for poaching 
in the Behring Sea, but he is also wanted by the Cali- 
fornia authorities on other charges connected with the 
now well-known Carmencita conspiracy. 

The bark Palmyra arrived at San Francisco on 
September 20, twenty-seven days from Koggiung, 
with a cargo of 39,996 cases of salmon. The ship 
Columbia and the bark Sea Witch, also from the 
northern canneries with salmon, arrived on the same 
day. The Columbia brought 43,000 eases of salmon. 
On September 9 the cook, Salvator Gentile, aged 40, 
died and was buried at sea the following day. 

The Lord Wolseley, formerly a British ship, is to bo 
transformed into a six-masted schooner at Seattle, at 
a cost of $41,000. She will be the first of the kind 
on this Coast. Over a year ago the Lord Wolseley 
was towed into Victoria from sea, badly damaged as 
a result of stress of weather, and later was sold by 
her owners in view of the cost of necessary repairs. 
Americans purchased the vessel for $26,000. The 
Wolseley is capable of carrying 5000 tons. 

The keel of a new steamer to be built at Esqui- 
balt, B. C, for the Canadian Pacific Railroad for the 
Victoria and Seattle route was laid on September 19. 
The new vessel will be similar to the Princess Vic- 
toria, the fastest and best equipped in the passenger 
service on the Pacific, though fifty feet shorter than 
that vessel. The new Princess will have four decks. 
She will be ready for service next year. The ma- 
chinery will be built at Paisley, Scotland. 

Captain John Bermingham, Supervising Inspector 
of Steam Vessels, at San Francisco, on September 21 
decided the appealed cases of Captains E. W. Spencer 
and S. H. Scammon. The Local Inspectors at Port- 
land had suspended their licenses as masters from 
June 14 to December 5, on account of the collision on 
the Willamette River between their vessels in May. 
Captain Bermingham confirmed the Local Inspectors ' 
action with reference to Captain Spencer. He will re- 
main suspended till December 5. Captain Scammon. 's 
penalty he declared terminated, and his license is re- 
stored to force. 



BEWARE OF OINTMENTS FOR CATARRH THAT 
CONTAIN MERCURY, 

as mercury will surely destroy the sense of smell and 
completely derange the whole system when entering it 
through the mucous surfaces. Such articles should 
never be used except on prescriptions from reputable 
physicians, as the damage they will do is ten fold to 
the good yon can possibly derive from them. Hall 's 
Catarrh Cure, manufactured by F .J. Cheney & Co., 
Toledo, O., contains no mercury, and is taken inter- 
nally, acting directly upon the blood and mucous sur- 
faces of the system. In buying Hall's Catarrh Cure 
be sure you get the genuine. It is taken internally and 
made in Toledo, Ohio, by F. J. Cheney & Co. Testi- 
monials free. 

Sold by Druggists. Price, 75c. per bottle. 

Take Hall's Family Pills for constipation. 



F. R. Wall, who was for many years an officer in 
the United States Navy, is now practicing marine law 
in San Francisco. He gives claims of all seafarers 
careful attention. Merchants' Exchange building, 
California Street, near Montgomery; rooms 429-430. 
Phone Main 5985. 



Bagley 's Sun-Cured is now packed in pouches and 
the fronts will be received assorted with labels from 
the foil packages, for premiums. 



Seamen and Contraband. 



The following important decision is re- 
printed from the Labor Gazette, the official 
publication of the British Board of Trade: 

A seaman signed articles in April, 1904, to 
serve on board a steamship, at £3 15s. a 
month, for a voyage not exceeding two years' 
duration, to any ports within the limits of 75 
deg. N. and 60 deg. S. latitude, commencing 
at Barry, proceeding thence to Hong Kong,, 
thence to ports in any rotation, and to end at 
such port in the United Kingdom or the 
Continent of Europe (within home trade lim- 
its) as should be required by the master. At 
the time of signing the articles, a state of war 
existed between Russia and Japan, and coal 
had been declared contraband by both Powers, 
as all the crew were aware. The ship left 
Barry with a cargo of coal for Hong Kong or 
Shanghai, as might be ordered at Singapore. 
On arrival at Singapore on June 27, 1904, the 
master received orders to take the cargo to 
Nagasaki instead of Hong Kong, Nagasaki be- 
ing within the limits of trading mentioned in 
the articles. The next day the crew heard for 
the first time that they were to go to Japan, 
and they refused to go because of the danger. 
The master accordingly arranged with the 
crew to remain at Singapore, and that he 
would call for them on his way back from Nag- 
asaki. The ship then proceeded with another 
crew, and reached Nagasaki in safety; but on 
her way back to Singapore she went ashore on 
the coast of China on August 1. She was, 
however, after some time got off, and eventual- 
ly reached Hong Kong. 

Meanwhile, on September 4, the seaman 
and the rest of the crew were sent home to 
London as distressed seamen at the cost of the 
owner of the vessel. They arrived in London 
on October 23, and the next day applied for 
their wages, but were refused. As a test case, 
one of the seamen accordingly took out a sum- 
mons to recover his wages, and the magistrate 
made an order in his favor for £17 18s. 2d., 
the amount due up to the day of arrival in 
London. 

The owners of the vessel appealed, but the 
High Court confirmed the order of the magis- 
trate, holding that the seamen had not con- 
tracted to serve on a ship which might carry 
contraband of war to a Japanese port, and that 
with regard to the arrangement made at Sing- 
apore there was evidence that it was intended 
that the contract should continue so far as 
wages were concerned. — Lloyd v. Sheen, 
King's Bench Division, July 1, 1905. 



In streets not more than 10 meters (32.8) 
wide in Budapest, Hungary, private buildings 
may not exceed three stories above the ground 
floor, say 20 meters (65.6 feet) ; in streets 15 
or more meters wide (49.2 feet or more) four 
stories are allowed, with a height of about 25 
meters (82 feet). The height of any public 
building or specially fitted private house may 
be increased 3 to 6 feet by a special permit 
from the city authorities. The particular rea- 
son for placing the foregoing limits on the 
buildings is- not given, but the ordinance fix- 
ing them is dated January 1, 1894, and copies 
can be purchased of Legrady Brothers in 
Budapest for 2 crowns (say 41 cents). 



The Federal Council at Berne has notified 
the Italian Government that the official inaug- 
uration of the Simplon Railroad will take 
place on October 10 next. The King of Italy 
and the President of the Federation will be 
] i resent. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 
JOURNAL 



Published Weekly by 

THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



\Y. MACARTHCR.... Editor | P. SCHARRENBERG, Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail. - $2.00 | Six months, - - - - $1.00 

Single copies, 10 cents each. 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Satur- 
day noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
southwest corner East and Mission streets, San 
isco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, 



SEPTEMBER 27, 1905. 



VOLUME XIX. 



With this issue the Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal enters upon its nineteenth year. We note 
the fact, as of importance in itself and as an 
appropriate occasion upon which to revert 
briefly to the genius which inspired the estab- 
lishment and which has throughout dictated 
the management of the paper. The Journal 
is growing old; as compared with the average 
life of similar publications, it is a veritable 
patriarch. With a well-established reputation 
among the labor press of the country and a 
business standing that is entirely satisfactory 
to publishers and patrons, the Journal is 
under no necessity of bespeaking either sym- 
pathy or support. The present occasion re- 
quires only that we shall assure ourselves of 
loyalty to our earlier traditions. Perpetual 
youth is a vain dream. The .Journal may 
have lust some of the (ire that characterized its 
youth, but we believe it has gained in place 
thereof a discretion that is at least equally 
valuable for all practical purposes. Estab- 
lished primarily to educate the seamen and 
the public, and. in almost equal degree, to 
espouse the cause of organized labor in every 

Craft, the JOTJENAL lias ever SOUght tO ''keep 

her so" — to steer straighl and true to the 
course set by the men who launched the craft. 
Of course, we have erred at times; that much 
was inevitable. Like the good helmsman who, 
while dreaming of home and beauty, lets his 
ship "fall off" or "broach to," the manage- 
ment of the Journal, while dreaming of this, 
that or the other "reform," has departed 
from the rule thai the only reform that 
amounts to anything is that which we work 
for, not dream of. With all that, the manager- 
ial conscience is clear on the score of reason- 
able care and enterprise, honesty and indus- 
try, and. above all, on the score that no word 
that may be charged to our dishonor has ever 
been knowingly published in these columns. 
With highest appreciation of the kindnesses 
shown by contemporaries, advertisers and 
readers, we start out upon another year's voy- 
age, with the hope and determination to main- 
tain the success already won and to attain 
that which we have as yet fallen short of. 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL'S "DECISION.' 



Washington, D. C, September 22, 1905, 
Andrew Furuseth, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telegram received. The Executive Council adopted 
the following, relative to Seamen versus Longshore- 
men controversy: "The Executive Council approves 
and indorses the letter of President Gompers, sent to 
the unions on the Coast, July 7, 1905, stating the 
position of the American Federation of Labor upon 
the controversy between the seamen and longshoremen 
on the Pacific Coast; and we declare as unwarranted 
and contrary to trade-union principles and policy, the 
demand of anyone or any body that longshon 
unions on the Pacific Coast or elsewhere to surrender 
their charters received from their International Union; 
and we request all unions on the Coast to protect the 
longshoremen 's unions in their right to maintain their 
affiliation with their own International Union." 

Frank Mokki 
Secretary, American Federation of Lnlior. 

The foregoing, sent, by Secretary Morrison 
in reply to an inquiry by the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific, contains the exact terms of the 
action taken by the Executive Council of the 
American Federation of Labor, at its meeting 
in Washington, D. C, last week. Tn seeking 
definite information the Sailors' Union was 
prompted by the wording, or rather heading, 
of the press dispatches, which intimated that 
the Executive Council had ''decided in favor 
of the longshoremen." A perusal of the Ex- 
ecutive Council's language shows that thai 
body, so far from deciding in favor of the 
Longshoremen, has said nothing bearing in any 
way upon the dispute between the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America and the so- 
called "International Longshoremen, Marine 
and Transport Workers' Association." The 
natural, and indeed necessary presumption 
that the Executive Council had in mind the 
dispute between these bodies when it adopted 
the foregoing declaration, indicates more 
clearly than does the language itself the de- 
sire of the Executive Council to evade respon- 
sibility for any decision that will really 
decide. 

The Executive Council knows very well 
that no dispute exists between seamen and 
longshoremen, as suchj it knows that the dis- 
pute in question arises between the seamen 
and a body which, under the guise of long- 
shoremen, pretends to, and wherever possible 
practices jurisdiction over seafaring crafts, in 
deliberate and contemptuous violation of the 
principles, laws and decisions of the American 
Federation of Labor. It might reasonably be 
supposed that with this knowledge the Exec- 
utive Council would find little difficulty, even 
if a sense of duty did not impose a mandate 
in the case, in declaring unequivocally for one 
side or other in the controversy. Such a dec- 
laration, if issued, would necessarily favor 
the seamen, since the Federation itself has so 
declared, and with increasing emphasis, in 
three consecutive conventions. The Execu- 
tive Council, being indisposed to make a frank 
statement of its position, yet feeling bound 
to make a statement of some kind, compro- 
mises between its own conscience and the will 
of the Federation by issuing a statement that 
means nothing. 

Of course, the ambiguity of the Executive 
Council's language is easily explainable. That 
body, in all its dealings with the jurisdiction 
dispute between seamen and longnamemen, 
has indulged the fiction that the repres* 
tions made to it by the opponents of the sea- 
men are made in the name of the International 
Longshoremen's Association. In taking this 
position the Executive Council, lias the excuse 
—a very good one, by the way— that the In- 
ternational Longshoremen's Association is the 
only body of longshoremen recognized by the 
American Federation of Labor, and, further, 
that the latter has upon every occasion specifi- 
cally and emphatically refused to recognize 



the longshoremen under any other name. Iu 
any circumstances the practice of assuming a 
fiction instead of recognizing a fact is a diffi- 
cult one to carry out. In the present circum- 
stances the ordinary difficulties of the situa- 
tion are increased by the peculiar make-up of 
the Executive Council itself. The President 
of the "I. L. M. and T. A.", Daniel J. Keefe, 
is a member of the Executive Council, and 
doubtless loses no opportunity to assert the 
claims of his long-name organization. Thus 
the Executive Council is under the necessity, 
not only of adopting a fiction — of pretending 
to act in the name of the International 
Longshoremen's Association — but of doing so 
in spite of the fact to the contrary, insisted 
upon by one of its own members. When Pres- 
ident Keefe invokes the aid of the Executive 
Council, lie does so on behalf of the "I. L. M. 
and T. A." When the Executive Council re- 
sponds to that appeal, it does so on behalf of 
the International Longshoremen's Associa- 
tion! The Executive Council "requests all 
unions on the Coast to protect the longshore- 
men's unions in their right to maintain their 
affiliation with their own international union," 
knowing all the time that no one has ever 
sought to interfere with the longshoremen's 
unions in their relations with their interna- 
tional union— knowing, as a matter of fact, 
that there is no international union of long- 
shoremen, that the body which now poses in 
that capacity has assumed characteristics 
which deprive it of all Legitimate claim to rec- 
ognition as such. 

As already stated, the "decision" of the 
Executive Council decides nothing, nor is it 

intended to decide anything. The terms of 

the statement just issued .are so general that 
they might well be indorsed by the seamen 
themselves, were the latter disposed to enter 
into the spirit of the Executive Council. The 
question at issue h;is been up for action by the 
American Federation of Labor during the 
past four years, and it is still before that 
tribunal. Thus far the Federation has ex- 
pressed its disapproval of the methods adopt- 
ed by Keefe and his long-name conventions, 
and until that expression is changed the sea- 
men will consider themselves authorized by 
the supreme body of organized labor, as they 
are impelled by the nature of their circum- 
stances, to adopt such measures as may be nec- 
essary for the preservation of their organiza- 
tion. The seamen feel confident that in pur- 
suing this course they will receive the support 
of every trade-unionist, including every Long- 
shoreman, who values the principles of the 
Labor movement above his respect for a decla- 
ration that entirely ignores these principles, 
no matter how apparently authoritative such 
declaration may be. 



The Labor Day address of Labor Commis- 
sioner Stafford, on the subject of "Trade- 
Union Insurance" (published on page 1 of 
this issue), is a valuable exposition of a phase 
of trade-unionism that is too much neglected, 
even by trade-unionists themselves, in the con- 
sideration of that subject. Probably no more 
profitable address wtis made anywhere on 
Labor Day than that delivered by Mr. Staf- 
ford in San Francisco. We commend the ad- 
dress in question to the carefid study of our 
i -aders. 



Bound and indexed copies of Volume 
•Will. Coast Seamen's Journal, will short- 
ly be ready for issuance. Persons desiring 

the volume are requested to notify the Busk 
ness Manager at the earliest possible date, 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



McKINLAY AND THE JAPS. 



The results of the investigations made in 
the Orient by the Taft Congressional party 
are already apparent in part. For instance, 
Representative McKinlay, of California, has 
discovered that there is little danger of a 
Japanese influx to the United States ! In a 
letter recently published in one of Mr. Mc- 
Kinlay 's home papers, that gentleman says: 

One other thing that the writer learned is that it 
is against the policy of the Japanese Government to 
permit her people to emigrate to America or any other 
country, excepting Korea and Manchuria. In a recent 
conversation Marquis Ito, the first man of Japan and 
next to her Emperor, said : ' ' Japan needs all her own 
people. Nowhere can she get labor equal to them. 
Therefore it is our policy to keep our laborers at home 
to aid in building up the Empire." 

Along this line the Government of Japan has passed 
laws preventing in some measure her laborers from 
leaving the country. If the policy is followed up it 
will allay the fears of a Japanese invasion of labor 
on the Pacific Slope, quiet the apprehensions of the 
working people of California and lessen the possibility 
of a serious complication with a nation which to-day 
at least seems earnestly desirous of becoming the true 
friend of the American republic. 

All this is very comforting, of course. As- 
surances of a similar nature have appeared in 
the American press from time to time; but, to 
be sure, it is something to receive these assur- 
ances from Marquis Ito himself. It remains 
to be said, however, that the talk of diversion 
or restriction of Japanese emigration is heav- 
ily discounted by the fact that the Japs con- 
tinue to arrive in the United States in con- 
stantly-increasing numbers. We very much 
fear that the "Yankees of the Orient" have 
unloaded a few wooden nutmegs on the Cali- 
fornia member of the Congressional party; 
either that, or the latter is disposed to put the 
credulity of his constituents to a pretty stiff 
test. 



"Government by Injunction" has laid its 
hand in unsparing fashion upon the Hotel 
and Restaurant Employes of San Francisco. 
At the instance of the organized employers in 
the trade, over twenty injunctions have been 
issued in the case of as many restaurants and 
saloons. The cooks, waiters and bartenders in 
these places have dared to appeal to the public 
for support in the effort to establish and 
maintain decent conditions of employment. 
This heinous offense has been met by the 
courts, with the mandate, "I forbid!" For- 
tunately for the dignity of the courts, as well 
as for the interests of the cooks, waiters and 
bartenders, the mandate of the king (ahem, of 
the judge) does not involve compulsion to 
patronize the firms which have sought the aid 
of the authorities in their opposition to the 
requests of their employes. The public is still 
at liberty to bestow its patronage upon those 
houses which recognize the rights of their em- 
ployes. The Journal urgently requests its 
readers to assist the men and women involved 
in this contest by patronizing only such houses 
as employ union help. Look for the working 
button of the waiter, waitress or bartender! 
The button is the only guarantee that fair 
conditions prevail in any given house. Ab- 
sence of the button indicates, in fact proves, 
the existence of conditions that are degrad- 
ing to the employes and dangerous to the 
patrons. 



Read the "We Don't Patronize" list, as 
published weekly in another column of the 
Journal, and withhold your patronage from 
the concerns therein named. A little personal 
interest in this matter will work wonders in 
the improvement of relations between em- 
ployers and employes. 



Whereas, There are now pending in the Police 
Courts of the city several charges of violating the 
Child Labor law, enacted by the last session of the 
Legislature ; and 

Whereas, It appears that in a certain instance the 
hearing of these charges has been continued from 
time to time, without proper cause, and in violation 
of the City Charter; therefore be it 

Resolved, By the San Francisco Labor Council 
that we regard such action as dangerous to the Child 
Labor law, and calculated to work the negation of 
that measure through non-enforcement ; further be it 

Resolved, That we strongly urge upon the local 
authorities the necessity of the prompt and strict en- 
forcement of the law, in order that it may be as- 
sured of public respect and obedience. 

The foregoing resolution, adopted by the 
San Francisco Labor Council on September 
22, is designed to correct the impression that 
seems to exist in certain quarters, namely, 
that organized labor is indifferent, if not act- 
ually opposed, to the Child Labor law. Labor 
Commissioner Stafford is making an earnest 
and energetic effort to enforce the law in ques- 
tion, and now finds himself hampered and the 
law endangered by failure on the part of the 
judicial authorities to punish, or even try, of- 
fenders against that measure. The Labor 
Council and organized labor generally 
throughout the State favors the strict enforce- 
ment of the Child Labor law and of all other 
laws and will hold to accountability all public 
officials responsible for any laxity or failure 
in this regard. 



To a trade-unionist one of the most inter- 
esting features of the Lewis and Clark Ex- 
position, at Portland, Or., is the exhibit of 
the International Cigarmakers' Union. The 
exhibit is in the form of a cigar factory, in 
which the process of cigar-making is demon- 
strated in detail by members of the local un- 
ion. Literature is distributed and every op- 
portunity afforded visitors to acquaint them- 
selves with the merits of union-made cigars. 
The Cigarmakers are entitled to great credit 
for their enterprise in this connection. It 
remains to be said that the Portland exhibit 
is but one of the numerous measures adopted 
by the International Cigarmakers' Union to 
popularize union products, measures which 
redound to the advantage of trade-unionists 
in all other crafts. Trade-unionists generally 
should show their appreciation of these bene- 
fits by demanding the blue label of the Cigar- 
makers when buying cigars. 



The charge, made by Secretary of the 
Treasury Shaw, that the Marine Hospital Serv- 
ice is conducted in a "grossly extravagant" 
manner will come as a surprise to those sea- 
men who have had the misfortune to learn the 
facts from personal experience. If the mat- 
ter were put to a vote of the Marine Hospital 
patients, acting upon their own knowledge, 
the result would be a unanimous decision that 
in the matter of economizing the Marine Hos- 
pital Service couldn't go any further without 
crossing the line of literal starvation. But, 
of course, the sick sailor may not know all 
that goes on among the well men in the 
Service ! 



The International Union of Flour and Cere- 
al Mill Workers calls attention to the fact that 
the fight is still on with the Washburn-Crosby 
Milling Co., and asks the support of organized 
labor. This flour is on the unfair list of the 
American Federation of Labor. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION. 



Headquarters, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 14, 1905. 
Shipping fair; prospects bright. 

Daniel Sullivan, Secretary. 
15 Union st. 



s* 


OFFICIAL. 


*l 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 25, 1905. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 7130 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping fair. D. McLennan, Chairman of the Joint 
Labor Day Committee, formally presented the Labor 
Day Trophy won by the Sailors' Union of the Pacific 
as the best appearing Union in the Labor Day Parade. 
The following resolutions were adopted: 

Whereas, The Red Front Clothing Company, of San 
Francisco, through the San Francisco Labor Council, 
has this day presented to the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific a Loving Cup, in accordance with the judges' 
decision that this Union made the best appearance in 
the Labor Day Parade of 1905; therefore be it 

Resolved, By the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, that 
we hereby express our appreciation of the good will 
shown by the Red Front Clothing Company in offer- 
ing this token, both for its value as a work of art 
and for the sentiments of interest in, and respect for, 
organized labor which it conveys on behalf of its 
donor, and acknowledge the honor conferred upon us 
by the presentation now made ; further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be appropriately 
transcribed and framed with the Loving Cup and dis- 
played at Headquarters as a pleasing memento of a 
great occasion worthily honored by botli donor and 
recipient ; further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be pre- 
sented to the Red Front Clothing Company. 

It was decided to permanently affiliate with Japa- 
nese-Korean Exclusion League. 

A. Furuseth, Secretary. 

S. W. cor. East and Mission sts. Tel. Main 5397'. 






Tacoma Agency, Sept. 18, 1905.- 
No meeting; no quorum. Situation unchanged. 

H. L. Petterson, Agent. 
3004 McCarver st. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 18, 1905. 
Shipping fair. Most of the Alaska Fishermen have 
returned. 

P. B. Gill, Agent. 
1312 Western ave. P. O. Box 48. Tel. James 3031. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 18, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. General situation un- 
changed. 

Wm. Thorbeck, Agent. 
114 Quincy st. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 443. 

Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 18, 1905. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

Wm. Gohl, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland (Or.) Agency, Sept. 19, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Situation unchanged. 

D. W. Paul, Agent . 
23 North Front st. Tel. Hood 352. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 17, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping good; prospects 
uncertain. 

C. Sorensen, Agent. 
222 C street. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 566. 



San Pedko Agency, Sept. 18, 1905. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

Harry Ohlsen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 774. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' AS 
S0CIATI0N OF TH E PACIFIC. 

Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 21, 1905. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 7:30 
p. m. J. O'Connor in the chair. Secretary reported 
shipping medium. 

Eugene Steidle, Secretary. 

54 Mission st. 



Seattle, Wash., Agency, Sept. 14, 1905. 
No meeting. Shipping fair. 

H. Rothschild, Agent. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters, Chicago, III., Sept. 18, 1905. 
General situation fair. 

Wm. J'kn.tk, Secretary. 
123 North Desplaines st. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS OF THE 
GREAT LAKES. 



Headquarters, Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 12, 1905. 
Situation unchanged. 

IT. R. Walker, Secretary . 
55 Main st. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' AS- 
SOCIATION OF THE ATLANTIC. 



Teadquarters, New York, N. Y., Sept. 13, 1905. 
Shipping and prospects good. 

H. P. Griffin, Secretary. 
166 Christopher st. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



..... . ..... ............. 




On the Great Lakes. 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 




LaKe Cargo Records. 

Willi the frequent announcement of broken 

records in tin' Lake carrying trade, the true 
inwardness of results accomplished could not 
he impressed upon the unaware with the scant 
announcement from time to time that this 
boal or that, boat lias broken a record either 
in size of cargo carried or length of time 
i to load or unload the same. The two 
steamers, Elbert II. Gary and George W. Per- 
kins, owned and controlled by the Pittsburg 
Steamship Company, now hold all ore carry- 
ing records on the Lakes. The largest cargo of 
the Gary through St. Mary's Canal was over 
11,0!*:! tons. As a matter of comparison it 
may lie interesting to know that in 1 HOI the 
barge Manila held the record with 7,398 
gross tons; in 1902 the barge Smeaton held 
the record with 7,576 gross tons; in 190:! the 
steamer Edenbom carried 7.799 gross tons 
through the canal, and in 1904 the steamer 
Augustus B. Wolvin captured the record with 
10,245 gross tons. 
"The steamer Elberl H. Gary, which went 

into commission May 29 of this year, has to 

date carried ten cargoes as follows: Ashland 
to South Chicago. 10,597; Ashland to South 
Chicago, 10,728; Ashland to South Chicago, 
10,877; Ashland to South Chicago, 10.7"»7; 
Ashland to South Chicago, 10,828; Escanaba 
to South Chicago, 12,338; Ashland to South 
Chicago, 11,093; Ashland to South Chicago, 
11,034; Ashland to South Chicago, 11,043; 
Ashland to South Chicago, 10,870. The 
si earner George W. Perkins, which went into 
commission July 11, has delivered seven ear- 
goes, five of which are as follows: Duluth to 
Conneaut, 10,514; Two Harbors to Conneaut, 
10,519; Two Harbors to Conneaut, 10,714; 
Two Harbors to Conneaut, 10,654; Two Har- 
bors to Conneaut, 10,514; Two Harbors to 
Conneaut, 10,760; Two Harbors to Conneaut. 
10,244. 

The draught of these big carriers is an es- 
sential item, but aside from one instance, the 
one in which the Gary carried 11,034 tons 
from Ashland to Smith Chicago, when she 
drew 111 feel 9 inches forward and 20 feet 1 
inch aft, are not available. The Gary in her 
record cargo of 12,328 gross tons from Esca- 
naba to South Chicago had a draught of over 
22 feet, but the water between these two 
points is exceptional and can not be taken as 
criterion in the general ore carrying trade. 



Mate and CooK Drowned. 



The schooner Y. H. Ketchum caught fire on 
September 17. oft' Parisian Island. The fire 
soon gol beyond control, and the crew lowered 
the yawl. .Mrs. I'». Ames, the cook, was being 
lowered into the boat when the latter capsized, 
throwing six men into the water. Mate An- 
drew Anderson jumped to the rescue of Mrs. 
Ames and reached her as she was sinking for 
the last time. He attempted to swim back to 
the vessel with her, but had drifted too far, 
and both sank in sight of the crew, who were 
powerless to render assistance. No other lives 
were lost. The Ketchum was owned by the 
Selther Transit Co.. of Cleveland, O., and 

sailed by Captain Dan Wilman. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



Bodies Found and Missing. 

Pour bodies from the wreck of the Sevomi 
have been found. Captain McDonald's body 
was shipped to his wife, at North East, Pa.; 
that of First -Mate Lewis Darwin to his wife. 
;it Medina. O. ; that of Wheelsman Nels Sal- 
verson to his brother, at Buffalo, N. Y.; and 
that of Wheelsman Otto Wellet to his mother. 
at Cleveland, O. The bodies of the second- 
mate and two watchmen are still missing. The 
owners of the Sevona paid all bills. It is 
to be regretted that the names of all those who 
died that the women passengers might be 
saved can not be placed on record. There are 
several stories afloat, but the likeliest one is 
that there was not room enough in the small 
boats for passengers and crew. Captain Mc- 
Donald called for volunteers to die that the 
ethers might live. The gallant forward rvrw 
volunteered to a man. 

Pour bodies of the crew of the Pretoria have 
been found and identified. The body of II. L. 
Bryant, cook, was shipped to his wife, at 
Duluth, Minn., that of Seaman Axel Lindloff 
to his mother, at Marinette, Wis., that of Sea- 
man Harry Schwab to his brother, at Bay City. 
Mich. The owners paid the expenses of send- 
ing two of the bodies home, but for some rea- 
son refused to pay the expense of the third. 
The fourth body, that of Seaman Alfred Peter- 
son, is still at Ashland, the Agent of the Lake 
Seamen's Union having been unable to locate 
his relatives. He is a blonde, 5 feet 8 inches 
in height, native of Sweden, wore a gold ring, 
with the name Selmar 19 14-2 05 on the in- 
side of the ring. The body of Isaac Mayer, 
seaman of the Pretoria, is still missing. 

W. If. Jenkins. 
( ionneaut, < >. 



Canadian Immigration. 

During the past year seventy-six agents in 
the United States received commissions of $3 
for each man, $2 for each woman, and $1 for 
each child induced to go as agricultural set- 
tlers in Western Canada. In Great Britain 
the commission for immigrants to Canada is 
$1.75 for each adult agriculturist or domestic 
servant, and half as much for each child of 12 
years or under. This money is paid to thp 
booking agents of the steamship companies. A 

commission of $2 per head is paid for children 
sent to this country by philanthropic societies 
and +1 per head is paid to the North Atlantic 
Trading Company of Amsterdam for all agri- 
cultural immigrants from certain countries of 
Europe. The amounts paid during the last lis- 
cal year were as follows: On immigrants 
from the United States, .+14.428: to steam- 
ship agents, sub-agents, and immigration so- 
cieties on British immigrants, $43,220; and on 
Icelanders, $2,104; bonuses on domestic serv- 
ants, $1,008; on immigrants from (heat 
Britain $2 each, $246; to societies for children 
from Great Britain, $2,608; bonuses on immi- 
grants from the continent of Europe. $35,316; 
total, $98,930. 



According to the statistics of the Bureau 
Veritas of Hamburg, 113 ships, of which 77 
were sailing vessels and 36 steamers with 26, 
904 and 37,336 registered tons, respectively, 
were lost during the heavy storms of April, 
1905. In addition to these. 376 ships suffered 
damages. 



Lost in BreaKers. 



The wreck of the Sevona, off Sand Island 
Shoal, may result in a number of changes and 
improvements in the Government service 
among the islands. It has developed the fact 
that had the lightkeeper at Sand Island had 
proper appliances or even a fairly decent boat 
he could have saved the lives of Captain Mac- 
donald and his six men. who were lost. 

Mr. Lewich, the keeper of the light, saw the' 
Sevona go on the reef, heard her whistle of 
distress and says that with the help of one 
good man and a good boat, such as the Gov- 
ernment ought to provide, he could have put 
out to the wreck and taken off those seven 
men. He had no such boat and therefore was 
absolutely powerless. Others on Sand Island 
saw the wreck but were powerless for the same 
reason. 

Mr. Lewich says those men were not 
drowned at the wreck anyway. They had 
built a life raft and had undoubtedly come 
clear to shore and were killed by the breakers, 
instead of being drowned. He claims to have 
seen them on a raft after they had left the 
big boat. Mr. Shaw, also of Sand Island, saw 
tin' wreck, and as soon as he dared, with his 
small boat, he put out to it and was, as a mat- 
ter of fact, on the wreck before the tug liar 
row got there. 

The Government should by all means place 

gi o;| boats and other life-saving apparatus in 
the hands of these lightkeepers if nothing 
more is done. 

Another thing, if these lighthouses were 
equipped with telephones, they could have 
gotten help from Bayfield in plenty of time. 
This telephone business, at first blush looks 
impossible, but it is not at all so. Sand Isl- 
and, for instance, is only about two miles from 
the mainland. A cable could easily be laid 
across this space and it would be cheaper to 
maintain and build than a life-saving station. 
There is a telephone line now constructed al- 
most to the bay shore, off Sand Island, and a 
Government phone could easily be connected 
with this line. Had there been such a line as 
this before the Sevona accident, no lives would 
have been lost. These suggestions are worth 
considering at least: they are all made by 
practical men. 



Missing Men Alive. 

Several persons who were reported as be- 
ing drowned when the steamer Iosco and her 
consort, the Olive Jeanette, foundered, have 
turned up alive, having left the boat before 
the disaster occurred. 

Among those who were reported as being 
lost were Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Barnes, first 
and second cook of the Iosco, and J. M. Quinn, 
engineer of the Jeanette, but a dispatch from 
Cleveland says that Mr. and Mrs. Barnes left 
the boat before she sailed on her fateful trip. 

James Kinney, of Milwaukee, was a seaman 
on the Jeanette, but left her on her last trip 
to Lake Erie. He said that Quinn. who was 
reported as being drowned, is alive and well, 
as both Quinn and himself left the boat at the 
same time. Still another to turn up alive is 
• lesse Waller, who was mate of the Jeanette, 
and who was reported as being drowned. It 
now develops that Walter quit the vessel at 
Duluth before she sailed on her last trip. With 



-* 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



all these people alive it means that those who 
succeeded them on the lost boats have not been 
identified. Kinny ^aid Quinn and himself 
left the Jeanette because her pumps were not 
working in good shape and that she was being 
overloaded. 

Jesse Walter, who was mate on the barge 
Olive Jeanette and whose name appeared on 
the list of lost after the foundering of that 
boat on Lake Superior, has been heard from. 
A letter received from him was mailed at 
Duluth and states that he left the Jeanette 
before she departed from the head of the 
Lakes on her fatal voyage. 



Marooned in Pilot House. 



The experience of the master and men of the 
Sevona has aroused the navigators on Lake 
vessels to a change in the location of lifeboats 
aboard freight steamers. At present all life- 
boats on Lake steamers are swung aft around 
the cabins. In the case of the Sevona, which 
broke in two immediately after striking, the 
captain and officers, who were in the pilot 
house, were simply marooned. There was no 
way for them to get to the lifeboats and all 
they could do was to construct a flimsy raft, 
which was quickly broken up. It is claimed 
that at least one lifeboat should be placed 
near the pilot house. With ships from 400 to 
600 feet long it would be a great safeguard, 
it is said, to have a lifeboat forward for 
speedy launching in case of a man overboard. 



Marine Notes. 



The steamer Johm Stanton, which was or- 
dered by Captain Charles L. Hutchinson, of 
Cleveland, for 1906 delivery, was launched 
at the Lorain yards of the American Ship- 
building Company on September 16. 

The schooner Minnie Slauson, reported 
missing, has been located by the master of the 
schooner Lyman Davis, who sighted the Slau- 
son putting into Sturgeon Bay. Her main- 
mast had been carried away, but she is sup- 
posed to be safe. 

With a red table cloth as a flag of distress 
the schooner Wonder was picked up off Ken- 
osho on September 14, by the life-saving crew. 
Captain J. Walton and Mate W. M. Burns of 
Chicago were nearly exhausted from their 
fight to keep their boat afloat in the heavy 
seas. 

Captain Frank Meno, of St. Clair, formerly 
mate of the steamer George Peavey, has be- 
come master of the steamer John Sharpless, 
of the Montreal line, succeeding Captain John 
V. Johns. Captain Meno is but twenty-eight 
years of age, and is probably the youngest 
steamboat master on the Lakes. 

With the discovery of two additional bodies, 
the remains of fifteen persons who perished in 
the wreck of the steamer Iosco and her con- 
sort, the schooner Olive Jeanette, have now 
been recovered. Of these eight have beeu 
picked up along the beach in the vicinity of 
the Huron Mountain club and the others in 
the neighborhood of L'Anse. 

Fred Owelett, of Pelee Island, a seaman, 
was arrested at Sandusky on September 15, 
after being sought by officers for a year. He 
was taken to Port Clinton to answer charges 
of stealing a yacht belonging to Attorney R. 
H. Crawford, of Port Clinton, valued at sev- 
eral hundred dollars. Owelett, it is charged, 
disposed of the boat in Detroit and is wanted 
there also on suspicion of stealing another 
yacht. 



It is now stated as probable that the work 
to be done on the dock of the Northern Coal 
and Dock Company, at Duluth, this year will 
be nothing more than the dredging and filling 
of the site, no attempt being made to put up 
any of the superstructure or the machinery 
until next year. Up to this time no contract 
has been let for the machinery, and in view 
of the facts just stated it is possible that 
action may be deferred for some time yet. 

Since the opening of navigation this year 
eleven vessels in the ore trade have been 
lost through storms and collisions. These ves- 
sels are the Sevona, of 4,500 gross tons; the 
Pretoria, of 5,100; the Olive Jeanette, of 2,- 
443; Iosco, of 3,000; Thomas W. Palmer, of 
3.100; Yakima, of 3,000; Linden, of 1,450; 
Ceorge Presley, of 2,800; and the John M. 
Hutchinson, of 1,900; a total of 36,543 gross 
tons. In a full season of twenty weeks these 
vessels would have a carrying capacity of 
730,860 gross tons, so that figure is to be re- 
garded as the season's subtraction so far 
from - the available ore carrying fleet. 

CONNEAUT LETTER LIST. 



Bjomlund, Axel 
Badgley, Frank. 
Caldwell, Jno. D. 
Critchley, Albert 
Davis, Thos. 
Devney, Will 
Dahl, Ernst 
Fuller. Archie 



Grant, Wm. 
Henderson, D. J. 
Hill, Harry 
Ingman, Gust. 
Isaacs, Freeman J. 
McNeeley, Matt. 
Paulson. Hans 
Wadsworth, Frank 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Charles Strachan, member of the Lake Seamen 's 
Union, is requested to communicate with Dr. H. Wilson, 
General Hospital, Conneaut, O. 

Emil Lundberg, of Boda, Oland, Sweden, last heard 
from in San Francisco in 1899, is inquired for by G. 
R. Lambert, 158 92d st., So. Chicago, 111. 

James Perry, a member of the Lake Seamen 's 
Union, is inquired for by his brother. Address, Fred 
Perry, 133 Clinton street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Milton Briggs Wiley is inquired for by his mother, 
at Philadelphia, Pa. Any information concerning his 
whereabouts should be sent to Lake Seamen 's Union, 
] 21-123 North Desplaines street, Chicago, 111. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lakes District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

121 and 123 North Desplaines Street, Chicago, 111. 

Telephone, lit 21 Monroe. 



BRANCHES. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS .' 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 171 East River Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1295. 

TOLEDO, 719 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 69S1. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone Peoples 4615. 

BAY CITY, MICH 919 North Water Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 94 Hamilton Street 

SUB-AGENCIES. 

MANITOWOC, WIS 809 South Eighth Street 

ERIE, PA 107 East Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 

SANDUSKY, 1107 Adams Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 931 Military Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL.; DETROIT, MICH.; CLEVELAND, O. 



Ashtabula Harbor, () 

Buffalo, N. v. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Erie, Pa. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven. Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich, 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistel, Mich. 



RELIEF STATIONS. 

Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
SaRinaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie. M 
Sheboygan, Mich. 
Sturgeon Hay. Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, (). 



We Dont Patronize. 

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Br xr a ^ — 'McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo.; 
National Biscuit Company, Chicago, III 

Cl ?, ars rr c . arl u P ma n of New York City; ' erbs 
Wertheim & Schiffer, of New York City; The H ■ r 
George and Tom Moore. 

Flo ? r— w T a . sh burn, Crosby Milling Co., Mi mica no - is. 
Minn.; Kelley Milling Co., Kansas City .Mo ' 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City 

Meats— Kingan Packing Company, of Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Pipes — Wm. Demuth & Co., New York. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 



CLOTHING. 

Buttons — Davenport Pearl Button Company, Daven- 
port, Iowa; Krementz * Co., Newark N .1 

Clothing- — N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa ; 
Clothier.-,' Exchange, Rochester, N. Y.; Strawbridsje 
& Clothier, Philadelphia, Pa.; Blauncr Bros., New 
York. 

Corsets — Chicago Corset Company. 

Gloves — J. H. Cownie Glove Co., Des Moines, Iowa- 
California Glove Co., Napa, Cal. 

Hats — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia, Pa E 
M. Knox Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Shirts and Collars— United Shirt and Collar Company 
Troy, N. Y.; Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co., Troy, N. Y.- 
Cluett, Peabody <SL- Co., Troy, N. Y. ; James K 
Kaiser. New York City. 

Shoes — Harney Bros., Lynn, Mass.; J. E. Tilt Shoe 
Co., Chicago, 111. 

Suspenders — Russell Mfg. Co., Middletown. Conn 

Textiles — Merrimac Manufacturing Company (printed 
goods |, Lowell, Mass. 

Underwear — Oneita Knitting Mills. Utica, N Y 

Woolens— Hartford Carpet Co., Thompsonville, Conn ; 
J. Capps & Son, Jacksonville, 111. 



PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 
Bookbinders— Geo. M. Hill Co., Chicago, 111.; Boorum 

& Pease Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Newspapers — Philadelphia Democrat, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Hudson, Kimberly & Co., printers, of Kansas 
City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey Co., publishers, Hammond 
Ind.; Gazette, Terre Haute, Ind.; Times, Los An- 
geles, Cal. 

POTTERY, GLASS, STONE, AND CEMENT 
Pottery and Brick — J. B. Owens Pottery Co. of Zanes- 
ville, Ohio; Northwestern Terra Cotta Co., of Chi- 
cago, 111.; C. W. Stine Pottery Co., White Cottage, 
Ohio; Harbison-Walker Refractory Co., Pittsburg 
Pa.; Utica Hydraulic Cement and Utica Cement 
Mfg. Co., Utica, III. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 
Carriage and Wag-on Builders — S. R. Bailev & Co., 
Amesbury, Mass.; Hassett & Hodge, Amesbury, 
Mass.; Carr, Prescott & Co., Amesbury, Mass. 
General Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark, .Etna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Iver Johnson Arms 
Company, Fitchburg, Mass.; Kelsey Furnace Com- 
pany, Syracuse, N. Y.; Brown & Sharpe Tool Com- 
pany, Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery Com- 
pany, Turner's Falls. Mass.; Atlas Tack Company-, 
Fairhaven, Mass.; Henry Disston & Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa.; American Hardware Co. (Russell & Er- 
win Co. and P. & F. Corbin Co.), New Britain, Conn.; 
Merritt & Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, of 
Carpentersville, 111.; Carborundum Company, Niag- 
ara Falls, N. Y.; Casey & Hedges, Chattanooga, 
Tenn. ; Gurney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont.; 
Sattley Manufacturing Company, Springfield, Ohio; 
Page Needle Company, Franklin, N. H.; American 
Circular Loom Company, New Orange, N. J.; Payne 
Engine Company, Elmira, N. Y.; Lincoln Iron Works 
(F. R. Patch Manufacturing Company), Rutland, 
Vt. ; Art Metal Construction Company, Jamestown, 
N. Y. ; Erie City Iron Works, Erie, Pa.; David May- 
dole Hammer Co., Norwich, N. Y. ; Singer Sewing 
Machine Company, Elizabeth, N. J.; National Ele- 
vator and Machine Company, Honesdale, Pa.; Pitts- 
burg Expanded Metal Co., Pittsburg. Pa. 
Iron, Architectural — Geo. D. Meskir, Evansville, Ind. 
Stoves — Germer Stove Company, Erie, Pa.; "Radiant 
Home" Stoves, Ranges and Hot Air Blast, Erie, Pa.; 
Wrought Iron Range Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
WOOD AND FURNITURE. 
Barrs — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 

Bemis Bros., St. Louis, Mo. 
Baskets — Williams Manufacturing Company, North- 
ampton. Mass. 
Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster 
Company, of Davenport, Iowa; M. Goeller's Sons, 
Circleville, Ohio; Merkle-Wiley Broom Co., Paris, 
Illinois. 
Carriages — Crane, Breed & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Cooperage — Northwestern Cooperage and Lumber 
Company (otherwise known as the Buckeye Stave 
Company), of Ohio, Michigan, and Wisconsin; Elgin 
Butter Tub Company, Elgin, 111.; Williams Cooper- 
ate Company and Palmer Manufacturing Company, 
of Poplar Bluff, Mo. 
China — Wick China Company. Kittanning. Pa. 
Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio; Brumby Chair Company, Marietta, (la.; 
O. Wisner Piano Company, Brooklyn, N. ST.; Krell 
Piano Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; N. Drucker & Co., 
Cincinnati, Ohio, trunks; St. Johns Table Company, 
St. Johns, Mich.; Grand Rapids Furniture Manufac- 
turing Association, Grand Rapids, Mich.; Derby 
Desk Co., Boston, Mass. 
Gold Deaf — W. H. Kemp Company. New York. N. Y.; 
Andrew Reeves, Chicago, 111.; George Reeves. Cape 
May, N. J.; Hastings Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Henry Ayers, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lumber — Trinity County Lumber Company, Grove- 
ton, Texas; Reinle Bros. & Solomon, Baltimore, 
Md.; Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company, 
Morehouse, Mo.; Union Lumber Company, Fort 
Bragg, Cal. 
Leather — Kullman. Salz & Co., Benicia, Cal.; A. B. 
Patrick & Co., San Francisco, Cal.; Columbus Buggy 
and Harness Company, Columbus, Ohio; Lerch 
Bros., Baltimore, Md. 
Rubber — Kokomo Rubber Company, Kokomo, Ind.; B. 
F. Goodrich Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio; Dia- 
mond Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. 
Paper Boxes — E. N. Rowell <fe Co., Batavia, N. Y.; J. 

N. Roberts & Co., Metropolis, 111. 
Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Co., Norfolk. N. Y. ; 

Potter Wall Paper Co., Hoboken, N. J. 
Typewriters — Underwood Typewriter Company, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 
Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Crescent Courvoiseer Wilcox Com- 
pany; Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Company, 
Sag Harbor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Advertising Novelties — Novelty Advertising Com- 
pany, Coshocton, Ohio. 
Burlap — H. B. Wiggins' Sous' Company, Bloomfield, 

N. J. 
Bill Pasters — Bryan & Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Railways — Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad; 

Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. 
Telegraphy — Western Union Telegraph Company, and 

its Messenger Service. 
D. M. Parry, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Wellman, Osborne & Co.. Lynn. Mass.; Thomas Taylor 

& Son, Hudson, Mass. 
C. W. Post, Manufacturer ol Grape Nuts and I'ostum 

Cereal, Battle Creek, Mich, 
i nmaier-Swartz & Co., New York City. 



10 



(OAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



On the Atlantic Coast. 



(Continued from page 3.) 



Cost of Living'. 

You are working shorter hours, you arc getting 
slightly more pay; you are paying more for your 
necessaries of life, and in a general way you arc a 
trifle behind your condition of a year ago. You are 
not very much behind, but still you arc behind, and the 
general upward tendency of the cosi of livi 
rapid than the general tendency of wage incr< 

This, according to the New 5Tork Herald, is 
the conclusion drawn by the United States 
Bureau of Labor, after collating the reports 
of several thousand experts, who have been 
employed in collecting statistics of wages and 
food in the United States. That, also, by the 
way, is the opinion of worlringmen in general ; 
and the cause of the falling behind, to which 
the Herald refers, is private monopoly of nat- 
ural resources, the storehouse of feature, from 
which all of ns must draw sustenance. The 
men who own that storehouse are, of course. 
in a position legally to charge almost any 
price they like for the necessaries of life, but 
this phase of the wages and food question is 
obviously not in the category of economic 
propositions, which newspapers of the New 
York Herald stamp are paid to expound. The 
general methods adopted by that class of 
newspapers for expounding economic truths 
is proof positive, in fact, that, with a few 
unimportant exceptions, the daily press is 
merely a gigantic engine for fooling the peo- 
ple all the time. It is. of course, tin exasper- 
ating thing to contemplate, bu1 if the major- 
ity of the people like to be humbugged all the 
time — and robbed of their birthright — there 
is nothing for the poor, despised minority to 
do but grin and bear it. Nature has accom- 
modatingly arranged things in this world so 
that the foolish may benefit from the wisdom 
of the wise if they so elect, and in return the 
wise must suffer for the follies of the fool- 
ish, whether they elect to or not. 



Look out for squalls in the Chinese Exelu- 
sion situation when Secretary Taft gets next 
to his boss. After having hobnobbed so long 
with representative Chinamen and the mem- 
bers of the corps diplomatique of the Celestial 
Empire, he would he more than human if he 
didn't put in a word for them where it will 
do the most good. According to press dis- 
patches, he is loaded down to the gunwale 
with suggested modifications of the definition 
"laborer," and a lot of "exemption" proposi- 
tions, to be submitted upon bis arrival home. 
Hence the necessity for looking out for 
squalls — that is, "Executive orders" to all 
whom it may concern to extend the courte- 
sies of the season 1o every "Son of Heaven" 
who may elect to visit these shores. President 
Roosevelt stands so straight on his "square 
deal" platform that at times he actually ap- 
pears to be leaning backward, and the danger 
is that he may some day slop over altogether. 



John D. Rockefeller is reported as having 
predicted that the most able-bodied panic the 
world has ever witnessed is due to pass this 
way in 1907 or 1908. Mr. Rockefeller oughl 
to know all about such things, if anybody does, 
for he is the protagonist and Grand Mogul of 
that little cabal of monopolies among us, 
which owns all the ingredients from which 
panics are manufactured. It is a reasonably 
safe prediction, however, that when the crash 
does come, Mr. Rockefeller himself wil! make 
rather more than an even break with poverty. 



Fag Ends. 

Every debt is a mortgage upon liberty. 



Work for the Initiative and Referendum 
and the Recall! 



He docs most to conquer fate who is content 
to work and wait. 



The weakest mind will gather strength from 

constant cultivation. 



When interest and judgment clash the lat- 
ter is seldom victorious. 



Enforced ignorance may be condoned; vol- 
untary ignorance is to be condemned. 



If we can't make others see the truth, we 
oughl to blame ourselves, not them. 



We live but to improve upon tin- past and 
to do each day's work better than the last. 



Xo man having virtues to be praised was 
ever made better by caviling at his failings. 



He lives best who does the best he can and 
"dares do all thai may become a man." 

Cupidity and ignorance are the twin roots 
of all economic and industrial evils. 



Politeness springs from mental excellence, 
For want of manners is but want of sense. 



It is easy to lie cheerful when the tide is in 

our favor, easy to be valiant when there is no 
danger. 



Every man must be judged by his creed 
and its collateral tenets. What we believe in 
our hearts, that we are. 



'Tis well to plan a good excuse, and well to 
be prepared for flight; but he who is prepar- 
ed to lose will never win a stubborn fight. 



Even as a good red herring is superior to 
a poor, lean fowl, so a humble master of but 
one branch of human knowledge is a better 
man than a jack-of-all-learning. The deep- 
draught ship will always ride better in 
stormy weather than a shallow, flat-bottomed 
craft, and sail better at all times. 



The old sea chantie, "Paddy Works on the 
Railroad," was recalled to mind the other day 
by the heading, "Laurier Works on Rail- 
road," in the New York Times. There the re- 
semblance ended, however, for the "Laurier" 
of the headline was Sir Wilfred Laurier, Pre- 
mier of Canada, and his "work on the rail- 
road" consisted in turning the first sod of the 
Grand Trunk Pacific's new transcontinental 
railway. Fancy a "packet-rat Paddy" being 
d in such solemn tomfoolery! 



President Roosevelt may well pray to be 
saved from his friends. Not long ago a 
West i]-n preacher likened him unto Jesus 
Christ, and now comes a Brooklyn pastor 
who thinks that his mediation between Russia 
and Japan, resulting in the Treaty of Ports- 
mouth, "stands for a miracle, far greater, 
more superb and more majestic than that of 
the Gospel of this day." If Mr. Roosevelt 
does not watch out some one will yet canon- 
ize him, thus making him unavailable for an- 
other term in the White House. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with the 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 

WM. H. PEAZIEK, Secretary-Treasurer. 
I M \ Lewis St.. BoatOIl, .Mass. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
OX, MASS., lUA Lewis St. 

BANGOR, Mi:.. 211 Broad st.' 

P< IRTLAND, Mi:., S77A Fore St 

NEW BEDFORD, MASS.. 7 South Water St. 

PROVIDENCE, K. 1., 464 South Main St. 

NEW TORK, X. v., 51-52 South st 

NEW STORK, x. v.. 68 West 

PHILA1 'ELPHIA, PA., 129 Walnut St. 

BA] vi Mi iRI \n >., 604 East Pratt St. 

NORFt U.K. V v. 828 Water st 

MOBILE, ALA., 104 Commerce St. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA., 987 toulas St. 

BRUNSWICK, GA. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN. X Y., 16 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass.. 284 Commercial St. 

RSET city. x. J., 36 Hudson St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, MD, 1736 Thames st. 
x. >RF< ILK, VA., 89 Church St. 
NEWPORT NEWS, VA., 2314 Washington St. 
Mi 'BILE, ALA., mi South Commerce SI 
NEW ORLEANS, LA., 987 Tchoupltoulas St. 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y„ 166 Christopher St. 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters: 
BOSTON, MASS., Commercial wi 

Branch: 
GLOUCESTER. MASS. 141% Main St. 

INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, X. Y. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, II. I... 121-128 North Desplaines St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, WIS., 133 Clinton St 

i ., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., s7 Ridge St 
CLEVELAND, O., 171 East River St. 
TOLEDO, O., 719 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, X. v.. 152 Main St. 
DETROIT, MK'H., 7 Woodbrldge St.. East. 
SUPERIOR, wis.. 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, Wis.. 515 Bast Second St. 
OGDENSBURG, X. Y.. :> l Hamilton St. 
BAT CITY. Mien. 919 North Water St. 
MANITOWOC, wis.. 809 South Eighth St. 
ERIE. PA.. 107 East Third St. 
SOUTH CHIC \ci i, il, i... 91 l-' Mackinaw St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, <>., 992 Day St. 
SANDUSKY, <).. 1107 Adams St. 
PORT HURON, MK'H. 93] Military St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS OF THE 
GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters : 
BUFFALO, N. V.. :.:. Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, MICH. 33 Jefferson St. 
T( ILE1 M I, i i,. 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, X. V., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, X. Y.. !i 1 Hamilton St. 
BAT CITT, Mien . 919 Water st. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR. O.. Tel. 30 
CLEVELAND, <>.. Atwati Boom 1. 

CHICAGO, 11. 1... 12 Wells St. Tel. Main 3637. 
MILWAUKEE, WIS.. 317 Florida St. 

Sub-Asfency: 
CONNEAUT, O., :>N1 Hay St. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters : 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., Southwest corner East 
and Mission Sts. 

Branches: 
•I'Act i.ma. wash.. 3004 McCarver st. 
SEATTLE WASH.. 1312 We. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH., lit Quincy St. 
ABERDEEN, wash.. P. O. Box 
PORTLAND, OR., '-•:: North Front St. 
EUREKA, CAL., I'. O. Box ::j7. 
SAN PEDRO .CAL.. P. O. Box u::^0. 
HONOLULU. H. T., P. O. Boa :'>:. 



PACIFIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 16 Steuart Si. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, WASH., Colman Dock, Room 10. 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAB. •"• 1 Mission St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. WASH.. Colman Hock, Room 9. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL, P. O. Box 2155. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC COAST 
AND ALASKA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., !i Mission St. 

SEATTLE, WASH., P. O. Box !-'. 
ASTORIA, OR., P. O. Box 18S. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., I Mission St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, CAL, 200 M St. 



THE COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the ilai es; 

also at the head [uarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALIA 

29 Erskine Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



List of Union Offices 

ALLIED PRINTING TRADES 

COUNCIL 

of San Francisco, Cal. 



Abbott, F. H., 314-316 Battery. 
Altvater Printing Co., 2593-^595 Mission 
Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 
American Printing House, 1067 Market. 
Art Printery, The, 41-43 Eighth. 
Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery. 
Barry, Jas. H., The Star Press, 429 

Montgomery. 
Belcher & Phillips, 508 Clay. 
Ben Franklin Press, 123 Seventh. 
Benson & Liss, 776 Bryant. 
Berry Bros., 320 Sansome. 
Bickell, L. A., 19 First. 
Black Cat Press, 402 McAllister. 
Boulin-Leichner Co., 519 Filbert. 
Brown, Andrew Printing Co., First and 

Mission. 
Brunt, W. N. Co., 102-104 Second. 
Budde, H. F., Cal. Press, 407% Turk. 
Church Press, 23 Davis. 
Collins, C. J., 16 Hayes. 
Cook, The Morton L., 14 1 Second. 
Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 
Cubery & Co., 587 Mission. 
Danish Printing Co., 410 Kearny. 
Daily Racing News, 21-23 First. 
Day & McClinton, 538 Sacramento. 
Drake & Baker, 850 Market. 
Drum Bros., 638 Mission. 
Eagle Printing Co., The, 344 Kearny. 
Eastman, Frank & Co., 509 Clay. 
Eastman & Mitchell, 415 Market. 
Fording & Halle, 22 Clay. 
Francis- Valentine Co., 5 Anna Lane, oft 

Eddy. 
Gabriel Printing Co., 320 Sansome. 
Galloway Publishing Co., 146 Second. 
Gilmartin Publishing Co., The, 19 First. 
Guedet Printing Co., 935 Market. 
Golden State Printing Co., 73 Third. 
Golden West Press, 14 6 Second. 
Granger & Caldwell, 526 Montgomery. 
Hancock Bros., 809 Mission. 
Harvey, John D, 509 Clay. 
Hayden Printing Co., 417 Montgomery. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 
Hiester, Wm. A., 529 California. 
Hughes, E. C. & Co., 511 Sansome. 
Illinois Pacific Glass Works, 10-16 Main 
Jalumstein Printing Co., 310 Hayes. 
Knarston Printing Co., 529 Washington. 
Lafontain, J. R., 603 Merchant. 
Latham & Emanuel, 511 Sacramento. 
Leader, The, 532 Commercial. 
Leilich & Colburn, City Hall Square. 
Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 
Levingston, L., 540 Clay. 
Luce & Her Co., 406 Sansome. 
Lynch, James T., 514 Kearny. 
Lyon, W. T. & Co., 161 First. 
Majestic Press, The, 1566 Market. 
McCracken Printing Co., 509 Kearny. 
Medina & Co., 221 Sacramento. 
Meyerfield, Albert M., 414 Pine. 
Monahan, John & Co., 412 Commercial. 
Moore-Hinds Co., 149 Natoma. 
Morris & Bain, 320 Sansome. 
Murdock, C. A. & Co., 532 Clay. 
Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 
Nevin, C. W. & Co., 532 Commercial. 
Occidental Mystic Press, 6 Cottage Row 
Pacific Goldsmith Publishing Co., 146 

Second. 
Partridge, John, 306 California. 
Pernau Bros., 543 Clay. 
Phelan, F. M., Ill Cook. 
Phillips & Van Orden, 508 Clay. 
Police Bulletin of San Francisco, Hall 
. of Justice. 

Polyglott Press, 62S Montgomery. 
Recorder Publishing Co., 516 Commer- 
cial. 
Roesch, Louis Co., 321-25 Sansome. 
Rooney, J. V. Co., 1308 Mission. 
Samuel, Wm., 411 V 2 California. 
San Francisco Newspaper Union, 405- 

407 Sansome. 
Schreiber, P. H., 809 Mission. 
Shanly, J. M., 414 Clay. 
Smyth, Owen H., 511 Sacramento. 
Spaulding. Geo. & Co., 414 Clay. 
Springer & Co., 240 Ellis. 
Standard Printing Co., 518 Clay. 
Stanley-Taylor Co., 656 Mission. 
Sterett Co., W. I., 933 Market. 
Sterling Press, 229 Stevenson. 
Stuetzel & Co., 144 Second. 
Sunset Press, 1327 Market. 
Sutter Press, The, 240 Stockton. 
Tomoye Press, 144 Union Square av. 
Town Talk Printing Co., 146 Second. 
Turner, H. S., 3232 Mission. 
Valleau & Peterson, 410 Sansome. 
Wale Printing Co., 621 Clay. 
Wenderoth & Brown, 319 California. 
Werner, Geo. A., 1067 Howard. 
Western Fine Arts Co., 529 Clay. 
Williams, Joseph, 142 Seventh. 
Wilson, Geo. F., 405 Front. 
Winkler, Chas. W., 146 Second. 
Winterburn, Jos., 417 Clay. 
Woodward, W. A. & Co., 12 Sutter. 

Bookbinders. • 
Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 
Brown & Power Co., 508 Clay. 
Buswell & Co., 536 Clay. 
Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 
McGreeney, Wm. H., 23 Stevenson. 
Kitchen, Jr. Co., John, 510-514 Com- 
mercial. 
Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 
Mclntyre, J. B., 424 Sansome. 
Mallove, F.. 422 Sacramento. 
Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 
Phillips Bros., 505 Clay. 
Rotermundt, Hugo L., 413 Sacramento. 
Webster, Fred L., 19 First. 
Whelan, Richard I. & Co., 42 Steuart. 
San Francisco Mailing Co., 609 Mission, 
5th floor. 

Photo Engravers and Etchers. 
Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery, near Mission. 
Bolton & Strong, 621 Clay. 
California Engraving Co., 506 Market. 
San Francisco Etching Co., 109 New 

Montgomery. 
McCabe & Sons, 611 Merchant. 
Sierra Engraving Co., 324 Grant av. 
Sunset Engraving Co., 108 Union Square 

av. 
Union Engraving Co., 144 Union Square 

av. 
Yosemite Engraving Co., 24 Montgom- 
ery. 

Electrotypers and Stereotypers. 
American Press Association, 19 First. 
Hoffschneider Bros., 412 Commercial. 
Martin & Co., 508 Clay. 



AHOY 



Buy >&ur Flannel 

UNDERWEAR 

Blue Funnel SltlRTS 

From tlie Store 
that 8£LLS 




They are Onion Made. 

Demand 




SCANDINAVIAN AMERICAN SAVINGS BANK 

Cor. Bush and Montgomery Sts. (Mills Building) 
SAW FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Capital, $300,000. Total Assets, $1,000,000 

Directors Advisory Board 

Charles Nelson Martin Sanders E. W. Ferguson J. Jensen 

Lewis I. Cowgill W. H. Little Fr. C. Siebe A. T. Dunbar 

J. C. Esclien Henry Wilson Mikal Olsen J. C. Everding 

Geo. H. Tyson S. D. Denson, Attorney 

Saving Accounts Solicited. Commercial deposits subject to check. Inter- 
est paid on savings and commercial balances, and allowed from date of de- 
posit. Drafts, Telegraphic Exchange and Letters of Credit issued, payable 
in New York, London, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and all the prin- 
cipal cities of Europe and America. Open Saturday evenings from 6:30 to 8, 
for deposits. 




Notice! Notice! 
REMOVED 

THE UNITED STATES 
WATCH CLUB 

9 SPEAR ST., Buckley Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



General News. 



Merchant Tailor 

REMOVED TO 

9 Spear Street, Buckley Bldg. 

PHONE MONTGOMERY 1242 

SAN FRANCISCO 




The Scandinavian 
Sailors' Home 

Cor. Drumm and Commercial Sts. 

Telephone James 4846. 

A new building erected especially for sail- 
ors. Latest improvements, clean and light 
rooms, bath, reading and dining rooms. 
First-class board and lodging at reasonable 
rates. Gospel service — Sundays, 3:45 p. m.. 
and Wednesdays, 8 o'clock p. m. All wel- 



I'lHlir. 



A. ANDERSON 

Missionary and Manage:. 



It is announced that the Czar will 
shortly call another Universal Peace 
Conference. 

Admiral Dewey declares that the result 
of the Russo-Jap war shows the United 
States need of "more big ship3, more big 
guns and good shooting. ' ' 

The Shanghai correspondent of the 
Morning Telegraph says China has de- 
cided to open Ninguta, Hunchun, Kirin, 
Hwantun and Tsitsihar, in Manchuria, 
to foreign trade. 

Secretary of War Taft and Congres- 
sional party sailed from Yokohama, 
Japan, on September 17, on their return 
to the United States. Miss Eoosevelt 
will return on board a later vessel. 

A landside which caused the shipping 
quay to sink for 150 feet of its length 
recently occured at Antwerp. Two thou- 
sand men were put to work in an en- 
deavor to prevent further damage. 

One million dollars a month is the 
profit which the Standard Oil Company 
will derive from the increase in prices on 
refined petroleum, which went into effect 
during the last two weeks. 

The Czar has granted a measure of 
autonomy to the universities, yielding to 
demands of the students. Higher edu- 
cation, it was expected, would be re- 
sumed on September 14, after seven 
months ' suspension. 

The Norwegian paper, Dagblad, has 
commenced advocating the establishment 
of a Norwegian republic, and expresses 
the opinion that in any case the people 
must be consulted before a new consti- 
tution is determined upon. 

If the troubles in Cienfuegos threaten 
to get beyond the control of the Cuban 
authorities it is believed that President 
Roosevelt will take prompt steps to in- 
tervene under the third clause of the 
Piatt Amendment. It will require no 
appeal from President Palma for the 
United States to take action. 

The report of the Commissioner of 
Pensions for the fiscal year ended July 
1 last shows that during the year there 
were 46,985 allowances under the Old- 
Age Disability order of March 15, 1904. 
It also shows that 655 pensions of $72 a 
month have been increased to $100 a 
month on account of total blindness, un- 
der the Act of April 8, 1904. 

The steamer Aragon, lumber laden, 
from Georgetown, S. O, for Philadelphia 
via Norfolk, which stranded recently two 
miles south of False Cape on the Vir- 
ginia coast, was floated after a short de- 
lay. The Aragon and the barge Saxon, 
also lumber laden, which went ashore 
with the steamer, but was subsequently 
floated, left in tow of the tug McCauley, 
and arrived at Norfolk apparently unin- 
jured. 

The Holland States General were re- 
opened on September 19. Queen Wil- 
helmina 's speech dealt largely with in- 
ternal matters. Regarding the defense 
of the country, the speech proposed the 
universal preliminary training of the 
youth of the nation in order to make the 
whole people a-vailable for defense, while 
means will be sought to complete the 
fortifications of Amsterdam as quickly 
as possible. The speech also proposed 
obligatory insurance against illness, in- 
capacity and old age. 

The celebration of the anniversary of 
Mexican independence at the City of 
Mexico on Sept. 17, was unusually bril- 
liant and enthusiastic. President Diaz 
opened Congress on the same date, and 
in his message referred to the progress 
made in public education, and touched 
upon the subjects relating to the notable 
increase in mining and agriculture and 
the vast amount of labor performed on 
port works. President Diaz also men- 
tioned the remarkable increase in the 
business done by the Postoffice and the 
Federal Telegraph departments, and the 
excellent showing of the revenues for the 
past fiscal year. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's WorKers 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Reports from the famine district in 
Spain allege that the workmen thre 
to burn and sack if they are not fur- 
nished with food. Appeals have been 
sent to the Crovernmenl to distribute ra 
• ions. 

Owing to the leniency with which 
Chinese assaulters of white women at 
Johannesburg, 8. A., have been tan 
by the courts a private meeting of miners 
was held in that city recently, at which 
it was decided to apply lynch law ami 
short all offenders when they are caught. 

Trouble between the great electrical 
companies of Berlin and their employes 
lias reached a critical stage. The work- 
men in several departments of the two 
chief companies have already gone on a 

■strike ami the companies threaten t" shut 
flown part of their plants unless the 
strikers return to work. 

Another big batch of defaulting mem 

Of Sydney unions was dealt with 

by the Deputy President of the ajbitra 
tion Court recently. The majority 

were ordered to pay all arrears in easy 
installments, and one individual was in- 
formed thai it lie again disobeyed the 
Court 's order he woidd b I ami 

jailed. 

A Sydney (New South Wales) under 
taker was recently lined £ll 6s. and costs 
by the Arbitration Court, on the applica- 
tion of the Master Undertakers' Associa- 
tion, for hiring vehicles for funeral pur- 
poses from persons who weri 
hers of the Losses' union, this bi 
breach of tin- Court's award and the As 

Bociation 's rules. 

During tin' New South Wahs Parlia- 
mentary debates recently it transpired 
that the so-called "Kefonn" Govern- 
ment is making a tremendous effort to 

cope with the unemployed difficulty by 
offering work to married men at the lux- 
urious salary of 7s. M. and a plug of to- 
bacco per (reek 2e. 6di for themselves 

and "is. for their families. 

The Adelaide (South Australia) 
branch of the Australian Workers' 
Union, has appointed a committee to in- 
vestigate and inquire into the complaints 
made that the South Australian School of 
Mines sends Wool-classing students to 
various stations to do practical work tit 
shearing time for less than the regula- 
tion wage. 

The Fremantle (West Australia) 
wharf laborers recently struck against 
the shipowners' arbitrary order that they 
must pay their traveling expenses across 
the harbor while engaged working cargo, 
etc. The employers then decided to 
give the men a fortnight's notice, so as 
to give them time to take the matter 
before the Arbitration Court. 

Labor is plentiful in Natal, South 
Africa, and persons are advised not 
to that country on the chance of getting 
work. Three months' notice of a reduc- 
tion in wages of Is. a day- has been giv- 
en to carpenters, joiners, and bricklay- 
ers at Durban. The wages of brick- 
layers and carpenters at Maritzburg have 
been reduced to 13s. a day. 

Following are the minimum wages 
and hours of labor awarded the Welling- 
ton Operative Butchers' Union by the 
New Zealand Arbitration Court: first 
shopman £.'! per week, second £2 10s., 
third £l' Is.; first small-goods man £3, 
second £2 Is.; hawking cart man £2 Is.; 
all these men to be found, in addition to 
weekly wage, or at employers' option to 
be paid His. per week extra; case 
per day, Saturdays 10s., and found, is. 
till, added if not found. Hours of labor 

not to exceed 56 in any week; incapable 
men may be permitted to work for less 
than minimum wage rates; and unionists 
are to get preference of employment. 



era are a.h. ertised for six mo 

twelve months, all told, if not called 
the expiration of rj 

le returned to the P 



Aamodt, 1. I-. 
Aass, T. A. 
Abernethy. W. E. 

Adolf, C. 

Agerup, Rich. 
Aglitzky, Hans 

. l'". 
Amundsen, Pet. 
Amundsen-1014 
Andersen, Ole 
Andersen-714 
Andersen-1055 

rsen-1009 
en, B. G. 
Andersen-1301 
Andersen- 1 

en, Lars T. 
Andersen, A. It. 
Andersen, Sigurd 
Anderson, A. E. 

rsou-604 
Anderson. Adolf 

hi, Thomas 
Baardsen, Ed. 
Barleben. E. 
Bauer, Frank 

■r, J. 
Benson, Ben 

h A.-1878 
Bergholm, Ed. 
uist, V. 

Isen, Aif 
Bindseil, W. 

son-] 272 

le, R. 
Blaekley, Albert 
Block. C. 
BlQCk, Herman 
Bock, C. 
Bohrman, Wm. 
Cainan, Geo. 
Carlson-760 

Carls, 
i 'ail. ssi ■ 

Carlsson, John 
Carlsson-4 19 
Caspary, Slgard 

CheviS, Fim 

Chrlstensen-986 
Chrlstensen, A. 
Dahl, Olaf 
Dahlborg, Gus 
Dahlgren. Oscar 
Danielson, Ernst 
I legn, Paul 
De Groot, J. 
De Haan, G. A. 
Eck, Nicolas 
Eckhardt, w. 

Fhelert, Aug. 
Eklund, Ellis 
Ellasen. Johan 
I'.liassen. .1. A. 
Eliassen. Ed. 
Elingsen, I'. 
Emanuelsen, E. 
Engeli. E. 
Engstrom, Chas. 
Fabrlcius, li 
Fagelund. Cms 
Fagerlund, G. K. 
Faragher, John 
Parsstram, C. 
Gabrielsen, Knud 
Garside, Ja 

hi, <;. a. 
Geissler, T. 
Gibbs, G. W. 
Gent-661 
Glaubltz, F. 
Gjasdal, Elllng 
Gottschalk, .Max 
Griffin, John 
Gronberg, Erik 
Grondahl, W. s. 
Hafstrom, Fred 

Hakanss Fred 

Halvorsen, J. 
Halvorsen-595 
Halvorsen. Wm. 
Hallberg, li 
Hammarsten, O. 
Hange, M. N. 

Hansen. Alt'. 

Hansen, lion: R. 
Hansen-1229 
Hansen, TheO. 
Hansen, H. C. 
Hansen. Fred S. 
Hansen-1 150 

n-15B7 
-1 450 

n -Ed wart 
Hansen-1464 
Hansen, Ole R. 
[ngebretsen, .r. A. 
Ingebretsen, C. J. 
Jansen, Henry 
Jansson-1579 
Jensen, O. 
Jensen, P. 

1-695 
Jepsen, Antoni 
Jobson, Chas. 

esen, M. 

esen-1 i.s 
Johansen-725 
Johansen-1275 
Johansen, Joaklm 

Johansen. O. C. 

Johan 

Johan: 

Johansson-880 

Kahlbetzer, F. 

Karelsen-.7u 

John 
Keaiuli, Wm. 
King, John 
Klrsteln, John 
Klemettila-567 
Klosson, Chas. 
Kolderup- 1 
Kook, Harry 

John 
Kopmann, J. 
Kortlie, W. 
Kosa, P. 
Kotcharin, J. 
Knaph, John O. 
Lajord, E. I 

sen 
Lane, Leeland 
Larsen, Christian 
Larsen, N. 
L.arsen-1113 
Larsen, H. 
Larsen-613 



Anderson. Ed. A. 

ison. A. i'. -1108 
Anderson, Fred 
Anderson, A. B. 
Anderson .Andrew 
Anderson 
Anile 

Anderson, I.. 
Andersson, A. II. -71 t 
Andersson. Oskar 
Andersson-lOfiO 
Andersson, Iljal- 

mar 
Andersson- 1 J 1 8 

son, c S. 
Andersson-] 1 19 
Andersson-1 -'•"' t 
Ainson, Henry 
Arvesen, Arnt 

Arvidsson, A. M. 
Aselius, Algot 
Ashford, G. i:. 
Asplund, Emll 
Bolsen, Knud 

y. J. 
Borjesson, 
l lonnan-10] 8 
Boston, Andrew 
Brandburg-1306 
Brandenberg, A. 

Brevig, Herman 
Brillowskl, M. 

k-727 
Brock, He-man 
Erown, ' !la I 
Bruggencoie. <: 
Brunver, Kasper 
Buck, Harry 
Burke, Chas. 
Buset, I. 

Chrlsti 

t 'tirist lansen 

Christiansen, P. 

Christiansen, B. 

Clausen-793 

Coadon, Louis 

Conaughton, 10. 

Alex 

Crlstiansen, S. 
Curtis, It. H. 

lie Jong. W. 
Dlerks, Johannes 
Dittmar, Otto 



Duncan. 




Durand, 


Stanis- 


lans 




Durholt, 


Hugo 


Enlund, 


<>. V?. 


Ennevalsen, I. 


Erlckson 


, E. 


Erlckson 


, Axel 


Eriksen- 


' 2 


Erlksen, 


( 'has. 


Eriksen- 


-.::'. 


Erikson. 


F. 


Ertkson, 


s. s. 


Evensen 


A. 



FJeldstad, I 
Porslund, \ Ictor 
Forssell. Frans 
Fredriksson, A. 

Grundberg, Ivar 
Grunbrock, II. J. 
Gulliksen, Gus 
Gundersen, J. 
Gunderson. ] ,. S. 
Gunsten, G. 
Gustafson, K. O. 
Gustafson, F. 
Gustafson-600 
ifson. J. 
Gutman, n. 

Hansen. Laurits A. 
n, Hans-1250 
Ed. 
Hanson, J. A. 

t [ansori 

Hanson, Adolph 

Idsen, K. 
[larghjem, I. M. 
Hay-] lV'.i 
Hedlund, C. W. 
Heggum, Louis 
Helander. Chas. 
Heloste, C. E. 
Hermansso:,. H. 
Hines, ]!. i;. 
Hlnrlchsen, Harry 
ii leresen, \'. J. B. 
Holm. J. 
Holmlund, A. 

Isakson, G. E. 

Johannesen-15 19 

nnes. n, ( (sker 

Johannson, J. w. 

Johnsen, Sigv. B. 
Johnson-1399 
Johnson, John 
John 

• t F. 
on, Harry 
Johnson, Aug. 
Jonasun-l 

rans 
t F. 
Jorgensen ,P. 
Jorgensen, Johan 
Jurgensen, Win. 

Knieling, John 
Kninitzer, Alt, 
Knudsen, H. 
Knudson, Chris 
Krieger, Adolf 
Kristiansen, Gus 
Kristlansen, T. O. 
Kristoffersen, J. 

nsen, E. 
Krlstensen, M. 
Kriza, It. 
Kroger. L. II. 
Krogstad, E. 
Kronvall, O. 
Kurki, H. M. 

Larson, NIels-801 

M. 
Larsson, Idorth 
Laurenson. Hugh 
Lausmann, J. 
Leithoff, Carl 
Leineweber, J. 
Lerche. Andrew C. 



T. 



Ljungberg, W. 
scar 

I owrie, R. A. 
en, Albln 
i.udwick, Berl 
Lukln, Th. 
Lundgren, G. 

■ HI.".! 
McCue, Thomas 
McGrath, .1. F. 
Menthen, Otto 

- i. Walter 
Michelson, H. M. 
hi. Gaston 
t, J. 
rog, P. 
Morrii 

Is, Wm. 
Morrison. H. 
Munroe- 130 
Munze, Tony 

Nil sen, Jo 
Kilsen, Be 
Nllsoi 

in, li- s. 
Nilsson-698 
Nlsson, James 
Norbin, Axel 
Nordberg, Oscar 
Nordlund, F. 
Nyhagen-685 
Nylund, Chas. 

N .man. J. C. 

Nystedt, H. 
Olsson, Waldemar 
( ilsson-562 

on, Gus 
Ommundsen. II. 
A. 

I Ivi I - en. And! 

Peterson, M. 
Peterson, < 

ion, J. 1 '■ 

pet row. F. 

Pettersen, Krls- 
ttan 

,sen. Johan 
Petterson, Axel 
Pickelmann, I.. 

L. 
Prepln, C. 

Robinson. John E. 
Rockwell, 'riii" 
Rosan, Oscar 
Rosenquist, Alf. 
istrom, F. 

Boss, Joseph A. 
Both, O. 

Skogsfjord, O. 
Skrrio. Mr. 
Smedburg, David 
Smith. C. H. 
Smith, E. A. 
Smith. F. 
Smith, A. 
Sorensen, Jorgen 
Sorensen-] 492 

nsen, C. 
Stalin. Otto 
Starkey. W 
Storsten, Henrlk 
Steuer, John 
Strandquist. L. 
Struer, John 
Swartholm. C. 

Todt, John 
Tollefsen, John 
sen. Hans 
essen- 1 10 
Torkel-503 
" ornstrom. Ed. 
Tralow, Rich. 
Trepin, C. 
Tronsen, Marlnus 
Tuxen. Carl 
Tyrholm. Johan 



Likatt. Ch. 
Lind, Christian 
Bindahl. Hjalmer 
Lindquist, 
Lindquist, C. A. 
i indseth, l 

T. O. 
\lex. 
Lindst nun. i i'."f 
Macbeth-1 124 

Hahslng, J. 

Mann. E. 

Mannstrom, W. 

M.'tdison. A. 
Martin. He 
Matte:;.!. W. 
Ma I I hews. J. 

Mattsson, Mauritz 
Man, L. 
Maule, G. 
Mavor-1371 
MeCormlck, J. 

n. 
Nelson, 
Nelson. H. 
Nelson. W 
Nicolson, W. 
Nielse, 

ii - 7 5 1 

n-717 
Nellson-525 
Nielsen, P. lor 
Nielsen, Mads P. 
Nlelsen-225 
Nielsen. Alf. 

O'Dal: 

i ilausen-1060 

n. I.. 

n-588 

Olsen-499 
Olsen, L. K. 

i llsen. ( lie J. 

11, J. 
Pearson, C. A. 
Pearson, John 

en, K M. 

en, P. N. 
Ben, P. 
pedersen, Peder E. 
Pedersen. Sigurd 
Persson 

Petersen, < !arl-555 
Petersen, Gus E. 
Quie, Alfred 

Ralg, Tormod 

Ramsey. Harry 

Rasmusen 

Anion 

in, ('has. 

er, Chas. 
Richmond, L. 
Roberts, Frank 
Sander-1068 
Sandston, '•' nil 
Sanvick, Johan 

SchIlllng-1241 

Schilling, ''nl 
Schlump, J 
Schroder. August 
Schroeder, Fred 
Schubert-887 
Schuhmacher, W. 

in, Victor 
Sepp$l. P. 
Siem, Cornelius 
Simonsen, Fred 
Simpson, L. C 
Slvertsen, Geo. 
Sjogreen. A. 
Taberman, Erik 
Talbot, A. E 
Tallant, Christy 
Tenzer, Franz 
Thestrup, L. P 
Thomas, .las. W. 
id, M. J. 
Timlin, Fritz 
Tiemann, John 
Tiesing. Ed. A. 
Tlerney, J. 
TobJn, Austin 
Uberwimer, F, 
Unruh, Paul 
Vanderslip. D. 

oe, J. P. J. 
Vassallo, P. 

ler, J. 
Watson. J. E. 
Weber, Emll 

Iborg, R. 
Wendt, Herman 
Westerberg, N. G. 
Westergren, A. 
Westerholm, W. 
Westk, Gust. 
West in. John 
Yuen. Ole O. 
Zachrlsen, J. M. 
Zervas, John 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Ahlstedt. Anders Bergquist, C. 
Albertsen, Fred. Berkelund, Rasmus 
Alexis. Hakan Bergotte. K. 

Andersen, Andrew Bernhard, Henry 
Andersen, Nels A. Bertelsen, Alf. 



Uken, H. 
Voigt, Arthur 

V. d. Moleii. 1 1. 

Von Asperen, w. 
Wlfstrand, C. F. 
Winter. John G. 

Will. CeO. 

Willman, Wm. 
Wilson. C. 
Wilhelmsen, Chas. 
Wlsbell, John 
Wold, John 

Wolfe. John 

Wolte. Paul 
Young. Alt 

ierg, John 



Charlson, David Moore. William 

:••. Bollion Mooie, J. C. 

Chrlstensen, P. Morgan. Oskar 

Chrlstenson, C. Mr. <;. i,. 

Christiansen, Fred- Myhrvald, <". 

erick. Neilson-754 
Christopher, GeorgeNeill, J. D. 

Cochran, P. B. Nelson. C. 

Courtney, Ed. Nelson, Jacob 

Dahlburg, J. H. Nelson, H. L. 

Dahlmann, J. A. Nelson, Nels 
Danielson, Gustaf 
Danielson, Axel 



Deising, Ernst 
Doran, Eugene 
Duis, J. 

Easterberg, Gus 
Ekberg, C. A. 
Engberg, Oscar 
Engstrom, C 
Eriksen, Fred 
Eriksen, Eneval 
Eriksen, M. 
Farley, George 
Farstad, Karl E. 
Eicher, Carl A. 
Flynn. P. 
Forstrom, Karl 
Forsstrom, H. 
Freusel. Adolf 
Gabrielsen, G. 
Gerwin, Geo. 
Giesler, Otto 
I Ginstrom. F. 

ow, Ingaard 
Gram, S. 
GreifP, Edward 
Grey, Walter 
Gronberg, Carl 



Andersen, G. 
Andersen, Joseph 
Anderson, Axel P. 
Anderson-760 
Anderson, August 
Anderson, Chas. 
Anderson-650 
Andresen-1271 
Arntsen, Erik 
Arntsen, Julian 
Austin, A. B. 
Austin, Martin 
Ayllffe, A. J. 
Baardsen. Edvard 
Barry, Michael 
Baumgartel. Alf. 
Behrens, Otto 
Benson. A. 
Benson, J. 

Beperholm, Jorgen Casson. H 
j. Castellio, D. 



Bjerregaard, Christ. 
Bjorkgren, Otto 
Bock, C. 
Bolin, J. W. 
Bowman, C. 
Brower, G. 
Brown, R. B. 
Brumhofer, J. 
Bryan, W. 
Calo, Augustin San- 
tos. 
Cameron. H. 
Carlson, Eric 
Carlson, M. 
Carlson. C. A. 
Candela, Emil 
Candow, David A. 
Carr, Marth 
Cassidy, F. 



Newnn, Joe 
Nielsen. Niels R. 
Nllsen, C. B. 
Nilsson, Henry 
Nissen. James 
Nordenberg, J. 
Nordsstrom, K. 
Nordenborg, J. 
Norholm, K. B. 
Nurse, Uriah 
Nyborg, C. 
Nvstedt, H. 
Nystrom, C. G. 
Oddie, Leonard 
A. Olsen, Andrew 
Olsen, Anton 
Olsen, Carl 
Olsen, John C. 
Olsen, R. 
Olsen, Harry 
Olsen, Ole Chris 
Olsen, Hans 
Olsen, Olaf H. 

Olsen, O. C. 
Olson, Claus 
Olson, Oben 
Olson, Olaf 
Olson, Regnvald 
Olsson, C. 



Gunther, Max 

Gueldre, De, Henry Olsson! Oscar 

Guldberg. Randolf Orling, Gus 

Maarsen, Chas. J. Orestad, Hans 

Hakanson, Claus 

I la nsen. Harry 



Hansen, B. 
Hanson, Rudolf 
Hartman, J. 
Havde, Mr. 
Hazeleaf, G. 
Hermansen, A. 
Hode, Th. Paul 
Hogberg, Wm. 
Hollappa. Osrar 
Horan, Patrick 
Ilorsley, Robin 
In galls, W. Lewis 
Iverssen, Iver 
Iverssen, Ole J. 
Jacobsen, Oscar 
Jarsen, M. B. 



Otterbeck. H. H. 
Parikka, H. 
Passo, Andrew 
Paterson. Oscar 
Patterson-875 
Paverson. O. 
Pearson, George 
Pedersen, Lars 
Pedersen, Karl M. 
Petersen, Ole P. 
Peterson, Otto 
Peterson. Richard 
Petterson, Chas. 
Pichleman, L. 
Piedvache ,Emil 
Pistel, C. 
Pooles, L. 
Punnhagen. Louis 



Jarvinen, Frans A. Quinn. Daniel 
Jensen, C. H.-569 Rasmusen, Adolph 



Jensen, Feams P. 

Jensen, S. G. 

Janson, P. *E. 

Johansen, Chris 

Johanson-1489 

Johanson-1338 

Johamnsen, M. 

Johanasen, C. K. 

Johansen, Axel 

Johansen, K. 

Johansen, Paul 

Johansson, Evert 

Johannesen, Jo- 
hannes 

Johndahl, Harry 

Johnson-1516 

Johnson, August 

Johnson, C. I.. 

Joranson, P. J. 

Jorgensen, R. 

Jorgensen, Jorgen 
M. 

Jorgensen, Wilhelm Serensen. Emll 
isen .Andrew Sorensen. C. J. 

Jungjohamm, J. K. Simmonds, A. E. 

Kalning. 1. Sjus. M. J. 

Karlsson, Julius Smith, Andrew 



Rasmussen, J. F. C. 
Reinholm. Karl 
Reuter, Ernst 
Ridderstead, Ernst 
Robertson. Michael 
Ronstad. Hans 
Rosen, E. H. 
Rosness. C B. 
Roster. Paul 
Roy, P. N. 

\. M. 
Salberg, O. 
Samuelson. A. M. 
Samuelson, E. 
Samslo. S. 
Santos, A. 
Sarpey, Martin 
Sater, Andrew 
Schee. M. J. 
Schroder. A. 
Seeley, Seth 
rieppel. G, 



Kettle, Owen 
King, John 
Klemetllla. G. 
Klemette, Gustaff 



Smith, Paul 
Smith-1418 
Soderman, O. 
Soderman, John 



Kloperstrom, Wm. Solis, Ingvald 



Sorensen, C. 
Sorensen, Soren 



Knudsen, F, 

Knudsen, Jacob 

Kristoffersen, Karl Starr, W. G 

Krlstofferson, Olaf Steckman. G. W 

Lafstrom. A 



Lambert, Edward 
Larsen, H. C. M. 
Barsen, Peter V. 
Larsen, H. G. 
Larsen, Fred 
Larson, G. E. 
Larsson, E. G. 
Lechner, J. 
Lewis, George H. 
Lie, J. L. 
Lie. C. 
T.ind, Carl 



Steelink. C. H. 
Steftenson. S. 
Stenberg, Y. 
Stornes, A. C. 
Story, C. P 
Storheim, E. N. 
Street, F. 
Suominen, S. O. 
Svendsen, B. H. 
Svendsen, Olaf 
Svcnsen, Gus-1316 
Svenson, A. -1193 
Svenson, G. F. 



Linden, C.W.H., v. d.Svensen. J. 



Lindman. H. 
Lindstrom, Alexis 
livonas, Michael 
Lofman, S. V. 
Ljung, Gust. 
Luby, Wm. 
Magnusen. Gust. 
Mahony, Dan 
Manson. Krist. 



Tandberk, E. 
Thomson, D. 
Thornton. Thomas 
Tigh, Thomas 
Timm. K. 
Toblitz, A. 
Tornstrom, C. A. 
Turnbull. R. R. 
Turner, Fred 



Martin, Austin. M. Tuttle. C. D. 



Martisen, E. 



Van Ree. w. 



Mathiesen, Martin Vigneault, Wilfred 



Marthinsen. K. 
Matiasen, Nels 
McCalllster, Mike 
McCarthy. John 
Medder, H. W. 
Meinar, J. E. 
Meyer, Adolf 
Meyer, G. 
Miass, Fred 
Michael, Walter 
Miller, James 
Mills, F. G. 
Mitchell, S. 
Moledo. Frank 
Molner, Johan 



Walsh. John 
Walsh, J. 
Wang, Julius 
Well, Charles 
Wennecke, A. 
West, James 
Westcott, W. 
Wilhelm. H. 
Williams, Al. 
Williams. Henry 
Winhneskl. F. 
Wirstrom, C. 
Wirstrom. Claus 
Yunker. Paul 
Zebe, Gust 



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Ardelenu, Joan 

Andersen, N. 

Bregler, Friedrich 

Carnaghan, Wm. 

Clifford, Elic 

Diederichsen, 
Heinr.-786 

Engebretsen, Mar- 
cus 

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1592 

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Krane, Karl 
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Malmquest, C. 
Moe, John 
Nelson, C. 
Robinson, John 

Herbert 
Roever, E. 
Sjostrom, S. E. 
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fcjwensson, L. 
Soderman, Eiis 
Valet, Erling 
Vanstone, Jack 
Watson, J. S. 
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ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Anderson-512 
Anderson, A. -1060 
Anderson, Ed. 
Anderson, Eskil 
Anderson, John 
Andersen, L.-1245 
Anderson, Axel 
Abrahgamson, Ja- 
cob. 
Benjamin, C. A. 
Block, Hermann 
Birkelund, R. 
Bostrom, 'N. A. 
Caiman, George 
Carlson, Charles 
Caspersen, Ch. 
Dishler, Peter 
Dlttmayer, Ch. 
Dybdand, P. Th. 
Eliasen, Elias 
Ehlers, Henry 
Gustafson, Julius 

Mansen, Henrik 
ansen, Th. 
Hansen, Wm. 
Hogman, W. 
Jacobson, John 
Jansson, 0.-1B79 
Johanson, Otto 
Jensen, P. 



Jorgensen, Carl 
Kelly, Patrick 
Lowe, John A 
Madsen, H. M. 
Martin, John F. 
Martin, Paul 
Mietinnen, Adolf 
Moe, John 
Nilsen, M. P. 
Ohman, L. P. 
Olsen, Adolf 
Olsen, Emiel M. 
Olsson, O. A. 
Oleson, Martin 
Peterson, John 
Pederson, Hans 
Paar, Ernst 
Pothoff, Harry 
Reynolds, Roy 
Rio, Nicolas 
Salvesen, Sam 
Schwenke, Carl 
Soderstrom, J. A. 
Svenson, John 
Swenson, James 
Thies, Harry 
Weissin, Charles 
Werner, Frederick 
Zambuera, M. 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



Anderson, Gilbert 
Baldvin, Melmer 
Balke, Henry 
Blair, J. L. 
Borkman, Fritz 
Clough, H. R. 
Cole, U. 

Decampo, Manuel 
Evensen, Andrew 
Eggers, John 
Erickson, W. 
Grusdin, E. 
Golden, James 
Gutman, H. 
Hansen, Peder 
Hobson, Thomas 
Holmes, Chris 
Hogman, Brnest 
Hubsaber, W. 
Johnson, H. 
Jorgensen. Rasmus 
Keaton, W. 



Lange, Max 
Larson, Werner 
Lundstrom, Fred 
Nygvist, E. 
Nelson, Rickard 
Nelson, J. N. 
Olsen. Charles A. 
Olber, Morsehins 
Ouchterlange, F. 
O'Harrow, Frank E 
Peabody, Frank 
Pad, S. V.-478 
Roth, Henry P. 
Rhodes, E. C. 
Schrimper, Fred 
Sundberg, John 
Sigvartsen, C. O. 
Thorsen, Thor. M. 
Valland, Olle 
Vatland, Ole. 
Wiebroc, Charley 
Yodt, J. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Allen, Frans 
Anderson-1119 
Currie, Jas. 
Edlund, J. A. 
Engebretsen, M. 
Gilhooly, H. 
Gottschalk, Max 
Hlnner, G. 
Ingebretsen, Nils- 

407 
Jensen, Jens 
Jensen, Johan 
Jensen, V. E. 
Johansson. John L. 
Karlson, Julius 



Larsen, J. H. 
Lundberg, H. 
Mikkelsen, Julius 
Olsen, Sam 
Olson, O. A. -104 
Pearson, J. L. 
Perry, Ben 
Piedwache, Emile 
Roman, Ted 
Schilling, C. 
Smith, J. A. 
Stone, M. 
Swenson, H. 
Thomsen, Thomas 



TACOMA, WASH. 



Anderson, Alfred J 
Benhardsen, C. 
Buch, David 
Christianson, An- 
ton 
Davey, Chas-524 
Eckland, Otto 
Grant, Bert 
Harju, K. G. 
Hansen, Carl 
Hubsher, W. 
Hansen, Maurice 
Johansson, Knut 
Johanssen, O. 
Kunigk, A. 
Larsen, John 
Leupstadius, Chas. 
Lie ,Jens L. 



Lindblom, Wolter 
Lowe, John A. 
Mooney, Thomas 
Myhrvold, Krlst 
Nelson, I. H.-777 
Nissen, Jens 
Nordeland, George 

F 
Olson, A-621 
Petterson, Oscar 
Petterson, Richard 
Ross, Ben 
Scharjen, John 
Schultz, Alex. 
Tham, Charles 
Thomas, Hamon 
Thomsen, Thomas 
Voss, Peter N. 



(Continued on Page 14.) 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE.) 

General Outfitters for Men and Boys 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOOES CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE. TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. 
Store closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 



1332 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

WALTER EHBLICHMAN, 717 Pacific Ave. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



HOQUIAM, WASH. 

When in Port at Gray's Harbor Call 
at the 

Horseshoe Store 

HOQUIAM, WASH. 

For your Clothing, Furnishing Goods, 

Hats, Shoes, Rubber Boots 

and Oilskins. 

Honest Goods at Honest Prices. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing & Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in union-made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



Chas. Eisenbeis F. W. Eisenbeis 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

EISENBEIS & SON 

Dealers in 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Crack- 
ers. Ships' Stores a Specialty. 
316 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co.(Inc ) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 
Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Port Townsend, Wash. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 
Dry Goods, Clothing-, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank, 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND 

VEGETABLES. 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Ratts. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



OLD TACOMA CICAR STORE 

J. A. DAVID, Prop. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Tobaccos 
and Smokers' Articles 

Union Made Goods a Specialty. 
2319 NORTH 30th ST. 

OLD TACOMA, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BROS. 




19 HERON ST., 



JEWELERS AND 
CHRONOMETER 
MAKERS 

Union Made 
Watches & Jewelry 
ABERDEEN, WASH. 



UNION HARDWARE STORE 

WM. GRIGGS 
404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 



Fine Pocket Knives, Tin 
Ware and Granite Ware. 



BARKLEY CYR CO. 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 
n6 SOUTH "G" STREET 

ABERDEEN, - WASH. 



W. C. JUDS0N 

EXPRESSMAN 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
Phone 693 ABERDEEN, WASH. 



When in Port at Aberdeen and looking' 
for Union Goods call on 

L. FOGEL 

Watch for the Red Front, 24 Heron St. 

Headquarters lor Seamen's Outfits. 

Everything from a pair of Rubber Boot:., 

to a Tailor-made Suit. 



FOR UNION-MADE 

Tobacco and Cigars 

GO TO 

F. KINGSTAD 

Stand on Knerance to Union Office. 
ABERDEEN, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



K. A. Johnson, last heard of in the 
schooner William Kendal, in 190L', is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Skamen's 
Journal. 

John Welsh", a native of Central 
America, member of the Atlantic ('oast 
Seamen's Union, is inquired for. Ad- 
dress, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Howard Goodlifle, laic of the bark 
Atlas, supposed to have shipped on a 
codfishing schooner in April last, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Skamen's 
Journal. 



News from Abroad. 



Field Marshal Lord Roberts has post- 
poned his visit to America until next 
year. 

The anniversary of the fall of the 
temporal power of the Papacy was cele- 
brated at Rome on September 20. 

The information has been made public 
that three Japanese naval paymasters 
have embezzled $165,000 of Government 
funds. 

In addition to Emperor William 's do- 
nation of $2000 for relief of the Italian 
earthquake sufferers, the City of Berlin 
has appropriated $25,000 for the same 
purpose. 

It is stated that the Russian Govern- 
ment has purchased the Union Castle 
liner Arundel, which will be equipped as 
a, troopship to carry ' prisoners from 
Japan. 

The Republic of Panama has made 
overtures to Costa Rica looking to the 
union of the two nations, and a coalition 
is the probable outcome of the negotia- 
tions now instituted. 

Sweden and Norway have reached an 
amicable settlement and adjusted their 
differences in a peaceable way. It 
is believed that Prince Charles of Den- 
mark will be chosen King of Norway. 

A large increase in the number of Rus- 
sian troops in Finland is expected soon. 
About 4,500, it is said, will be sent to 
Helsingfors, 200 to Viborg and 90() to 
Vasa. The troops will be quartered in 
private houses. 

M. Plancon, secretary of the Russian 
Peace Commission, arrived at St. Peters- 
burg on September 21, bearing the treaty 
signed by the plenipotentiaries, whieh 
was turned over to the custody of the 
Foreign Office. 

A powerful pump has arrived at Sase- 
1)0 from Port Arthur to be used in float- 
ing the Japanese battleship Mikasa, 
which was recently sunk with great loss 
of life. It is expected to refloat the 
Mikasa within three months. 

Russian and Japanese squadrons, com- 
manded respectively by Rear-Admiral 
.lessen and Vice-Admiral Kamimura, met 
in Koruiloff Bay, in the vicinity of 
Vladivostock, on September 1G, and the 
Admirals arranged the terms of the naval 
;■> mistice. 

The registration at Odessa, Russia, in 
connection with the elections to the Na- 
tional Assembly shows a somewhat re- 
markable condition of affairs. Only 115 
out of 7000 qualified voters thus far 
have placed their names on the voting 
register. 

The French Minister of Posts and 
Telegraph has decided to proceed at once 
1<. the construction of the telegraph lines 
across the Sahara Desert, which is to 
place in direct communication Algeria 
and the French possessions on the West 
African coast. 

Dr. Thomas John Barnardo, the well- 
known founder and director of philan- 
thropic institutions by which over 55,000 
orphan waifs have been rescued, train- 
ed and placed out in life, died at Lon- 
don, Kng., on September 19, after a 
short illness. He was born in Ireland in 
IS 15. 

As a result of the arbitrary and in- 
tolerant action of President Castro to- 
ward M. Taigny, the French Charge 
d 'Affaires at Caracas, there is serious 
friction between Prance ami Venezuela, 

and there is grave possibility, of a na\al 
demonstration to compel proper respect. 
I'm- the French Republic. 

In consequence of the recent attack by 
Moors on a Spanish journalist and the 
refusal of the chiefs to give salisl'act ion 
therefor, the Spanish Ministry of Marine 
his ordered the sloop-of-war Infanta 
Isabella to proceed to (Vuta, a Spanish 
I'uil and seaport on a small peninsula in 
tin' north of Morocco. 






14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



The San Francisco Labor Council has 
passed a resolution censuring certain local 
Police Court judges for their failure to 
enforce the Child Labor law. 

The last pay-day at the Carnegie works 
in and around Pittsburg, Pa., was the 
largest in the history of the concern. It 
is estimated that $2,000,000 were paid 
out to workmen. 

Compositors in eight book and job 
printing establishments at Rochester, N. 
Y., quit work on September 16 to enforce 
their demands for an eight-hour day. A 
number of the independent firms have 
signed the eight-hour agreement. 

A movement to do away with high- 
priced labor by women is said to have 
been undertaken by the Elgin National 
Watch Company. During the last six 
months it has been noticed that when 
women leave or are discharged their 
places have been taken by men. 

Five thousand mine workers paraded 
in Mahanoy City, Pa., on September 13, 
in honor of President John Mitchell, who 
was given a rousing reception. Every 
colliery in the Mahanoy Valley was clos- 
ed, the 10,000 employes making a holiday 
of it. President Mitchell in his B] 
came out strongly for recognition of the 
union and an eight-hour workday. 

The demand of the street railway men 
at New Haven, Conn., for an increase to 
twenty-five cents per hour in the wages 
paid for overtime work has been refused 
by President Mellen, of the New York, 
New Haven and Hartford Railroad, al- 
though he has made some concessions to 
the men on their further demand of in- 
crease in the hourly wage. 

About 350 window glass workers nut 
in Bridgeton, N. J., recently and resolv- 
ed to indorse the amalgamated wage 
scale of force at present in the factory 
of the Cumberland Company at Bridge- 
ton and the factory of the North Ameri- 
can Company at Millville. This means 
that all these men, who were employed 
in the West last year, will work in the 
East in the present blast. 

(ieueral President Rickert, of the 
United Garment Workers, at a mass-meet- 
ing of his craft held at Toronto recently, 
expressed the sentiments of all enlight- 
ened trade-uinonists in the following 
words of wisdom : "I believe it essential 
to have in the union every person who 
could occupy positions held by union men 
in case of strikes. The problem yet to 
be solved is how to get them in. ' ' 

With the selection of Indianapolis as 
the next meeting-place of the conven- 
tion and the election of officers for the 
coming year, the International Build- 
ing Trades Council convention adjourned 
at Denver, Colo., on September 16. Pat- 
rick J. Coughlin of St. Louis was elected 
president. Phil McUinnis of Milwaukee, 
the retiring president, was made general 
organizer. 

Steps were taken by the Columbus 
(Ohio) Trades and Labor Assembly to 
attempt the impeachment of Superior 
Judge Howard Ferris of Cincinnati on 
account of his order restraining the Iron 
Molders ' Union from soliciting persons 
to join the union. The assembly in- 
structed its legislative committee to at 
once employ counsel to prepare the im- 
peachment case. 

The International Building Trades 
Council revised its constitution at Den- 
ver, Colo., on September 13. The prin- 
cipal revision is in regard to public 
works. The body has taken a strong 
stand against the award of general con- 
tracts for municipal and State buildings 
and improvements. The constitution, as 
revised, makes the abolition of the con- 
tract system one of the principal objects 
of the Council 's endeavor. It also favors 
the establishment of a universal eight- 
hour day. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



SAWTELLE CLOTHING STORE 



H. A. SCHWARTZ, Prop. 



Headquarters for Seamen's Wearing Apparel. 
A complete line of Union Made goods in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats, Furnishing Goods, 
Oil Clothing, Rubber Boots, etc., etc. 



AGENTS FOR W. L. DOUGLAS SHOES 

$3.00 to $5.00, Union Made. 

307 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



Just around corner 
from Union Office. 



HERMAN SCHLLZE 
CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F 

EUREKA. CAL. 



White Labor Only 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

J. A. ANDERSON, Proprietor. 



BOARD AND LODGING 

J5.00 PER WEEK. 
Neatest and Cleanest Place in Town. 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorites," tho "little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second St., EUREKA, CAL. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WEKGOED, Proprietor. 



CORNER FIRST AND D STREETS. 



The Finest Beer Brewed on the Coast 
by the 

Humboldt Brewing Co. 

2996-3048 Broadway. 

Delivered and shipped to any part of 
the City and County on short notice. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELAKEY & YOUNG. 



Manufacturer 'if all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's 
Soda. Also bottler and dealer in En- 
terprise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



First-class Board and Lodging 

Reasonable Rates. 



Front Street, between C and D, 
EUREKA, CAL. 



The EibM Lodging fa 

F. BOBGP.S, Proprietor. 

NEATEST AND CLEANEST PLACE 
IN EUREKA. 



313 FIRST STREET. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 

OSCAR SWANSON, Proprietor. 
An old-time Union Man. 



Board and lodging,? $r> per week. 
Single meals, 25c. Beds, 50c. 



322 First Street, between D and E, 
EUREKA, CAL. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



ISSUED BY AUTHORITY Of* 




From 
..Maker to Wearer.. 



The only Clothing Establishment on the Pacific Coast selling goods at less 
than Eastern Prices. 

JACOBSEN. CLOTHIER 

Manufacturer and Retailer 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS AND FURNISHINGS. 

812 and 814 FIRST AVENUE. ., SEATTLE WASH. 




CLOTHING HOUSE 

Wholesale and Retail 

Clothing, Furnishing: Goods 
Boots, Shoes 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits 

ALL UNION MADE GOODS 

Only Union Clerks Employed. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

navigation and nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH Principal 

Miss Helen C. Smith Assistant 

Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Naviga- 
tion. Successful Compass Adjuster. 
Ocean license unlimited. Steam and 
snil, American and British. 
472 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300 




SHOE & CLOTHING COMPANY 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 



615=617 First Ave. 

SEATTLE, WASH 



OPPOSITE 
TOTEM POLE 



THE "OUR HOUSE" CIGAR STORE 

E. J. HABERER, Proprietor, 

151 WASHINGTON ST., SEATTLE. 



Carries a full line of Cig-ars, Tobaccos 
and Smokers' Articles. 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY. 

TihI. IIS. 



When Purchasing from our Advertisers Always Mention the 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



LETTER LIST. 



(Continued from Page 13.) 



EUBEXA, CAL 



Andersen, Chas. 
Arversen, Arturt 
Boysson, B. C. 
I'idricks, Dlllef. 
Hansen, Hans T. 
Romberg, J. P. 
Larsen, Alfred 
Olsen, Anton 
Olsen, Arthur G. 



Olsen, II. 
Schoen, John 
.Sprceslis, F. 
Thoresen, Peter 
Tusten, Carl 
Vubrook, Carl 
Walburg, oJhn 
Wahlstedt, Alfred 
Wahlstedt, Albert 



Letters in the Office of the Fishermen's 
Union of the Pacific Coast and Alaska, 
San Francisco. 
Bahr, Frank Knudtsen, Hans O. 

Ekstrand, Frank Nelson, John 
Johnsen, Henry Vogt, Wllhelm 

Jacobson, C. E, Wilson, Harry 

Letters in the Office of the Marine 
Cooks and Stewards' Association, San 
Francisco. 



Ahlquist. F. W. 
Alverson, Edward 
Anderson, A. F. 
Aspengren, Theo- 

dor. 
Beardall, Robert 
Branford, chas. 
Campbell. Nell H. 
Cederholm, Victor 
Duke, Charles 
Gleason, Wm. 
Godley, G. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hanslng, W. 
Henryks, Bert 
Jensen, J. C. 
Jessamine, James 
Jorgenson, Chas. 
Kendall, E. C. 
Kennedy, Thomas 
Kloot, Johannes 
McConaghy, Dav. 
McDonald, T. 
McLaughlin, Hugh 



McStay, Edward 
.Miller, A. T. 
Mills, A. 
Nelson, Frank 
Olsen, Charles 
Palmer, John W. 
Pestell. Stanley 
Pons, Simon S. 
Purday, Harry 
Bins, Manuel 
Roberts, Stanley 
Sannlno, Giuseppe 
Spidowsky, Theodor 
Turner, W. 
Veldon, Thos. 
Wickstrom, John 
Wilson. Joe 
Wilson, J. T. 
Wilson, Peter 
Wilshart. Dav. 
Wolf, John 
Wolters, Geo. 
Young, Charles 



Letters in the Office of the Marine 
Cooks and Stewards' Association, 
Seattle, Wash. 



Brady. W. L. 
Brantford, Chas. 
Fuller. E. E. 
Hafford, H. 
Harrlgan, E. 
Klool, Mr. 
Lewis, Miles 
Magnusen, Gus 
McCarthy. T. J. 
Menton, John 
O'Brien, P. 



Pane, Fred 
Prell, H. 
Purdy, Harry 
Romero. S. 
Ruderman, Jacob 
Shreve, H. S. 
Smith. J. P. 
Vlnce. H. 
Waring. H. 
Yager, Ralph 
York, Geo. 



EUREKA. CAL. 



.1 Pern 



F. Hess 



UNION TRANSFER 
Baggage and Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES 
Office, 119 D Street 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDG. 
Phone Main 70. EUREKA, CAL. 

FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

■ IB 

SQUARE MEAL 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D St., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 

ASTORIA, OR. 



COLUMBIA RIVER 

Fishermen's Protective Union 

Headquarters, Astoria, Or. 

H. M. LOEHTSEN, Secretary, 

P. O. Box 138. 

The Reading Room is open at all 

times to Members of the 

Sailors' Union. 



PORTLAND, OR. 

EXPRESS No. 101 



Stand near Sailors' Union Office. 

Also Furnished Booms. Call at Cigar 

Store, 201 Burnside St. 

P. P. JOHNSON, 

Phone Scott 5922. Portland, Or. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



B0NNEY & STEWART 

UNDERTAKERS 
Third & Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a 
specialty. All orders by telephone 
or telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Williclm Jurgensen, a native of Flena- 
burg, Germany, member of the Sailors' 
Union of thf Pacific, is inquired for by 
his father. Address, Coast Seamen's 

JOl i:NAL. 



mmmm 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

240 Montgomery St., Cor. Fine. 

Rooms 14-15-16. Phone Main 5719. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 



CITY FRONT DRUG STORE 

W. L. BOURNS, Proprietor. 

10 Mission Street 
Phone Bush 810. San Francisco. 

Careful attention given to Supply- 
ing Ships with Drugs. 



DENTIST 

DR. MARX 



HOURS 



8.30 to 12 
1.30 to 7.00 



Physician and Surgeon 

DR. FRENCH 



HOURS 



9 to 12 
5:30 to 6:30 
Residence Phone East S 



I 



9 MISSION STREET 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, San Fran- 
cisco. Office phone Bush 810. 



California Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company 

Receives Savings Deposits of 
Ten Dollars and Upwards. 

IT PAYS INTEREST 

TWICE A YEAR. 

Rate — 

314 per cent on ordinary accounts 
3 6/10 per cent on term accounts 

CAPITAL S, SURPLUS, $ 1,500,399.46 
TOTAL ASSETS. - 7,665,839.38 



Deposits may be made by P. O. 
Order, Wells-Fargo Money Order 
or Bank Draft 

Send for Pamphlets Descriptive 
of our Business 



OFFICES 

Cor. California and Montgomery Sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




IS YOUR MONEY SAFE? 

It's all right in a stocking, if — an en- 
terprising burglar doesn't get it, if you 
don't forget where you put it last, or the 
house doesn't burn down. The best way 
to insure its safety is to put it in this 
bank, where savings accounts earn 3% 
per cent interest and term deposits earn 
4 per cent, compounded every six 
months. 

Open Saturday evenings from 5 to 8 
o'clock. 



THE MARKET STREET BANK, 

Seventh and Market Sts., 
San Francisco. 



California Undertaking Co. 

PRIVATE - RESIDENCE - PARLORS 





B J. 


Dcvli 


■*. Manager 






WM. M. 


Lindsev, Secretary 




713 


POST ST 


, SAN 


FRA NCISCO, 


CAL. 




EMBALMING 


A SPECIALTY 




OPEN DAY AND h 


IQMT 


TELEPHONE EAST 1283 













Frank J. Symmes, President Henry Brunner, Cashier 

Chas. Nelson, Vice-President F. F. Ouer, Asst. Cashier 

O. A. Hale, Vice-President Otto Ottesen, Asst. Cashier 

E. W. Runyon, Vice-President 

CENTRAL TRUST CO. OF CALIFORNIA 

42 Montgomery Street, Corner of Sutter Street, SAN FRANCISCO 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS PAIS ITS!. - . $1,765,000.00 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

314% per Annum on Ordinary Deposits 3 6/10% per Annum on Term Deposits 

"We sell Drafts and Money Orders on all cities 
In Norway, Sweden and Denmark at Cheapest Rates 
Our Bank in Norway is: Our Bank in Denmark is: 

Central Banken for Norge in Den Danske Landmands Bank in 

Christiania. Copenhagen. 

Our Bank in Sweden is: Skanes Enskilda Bank in Malmo. 
We write and speak the Scandinavian languages. 
DIRECTORS: 
F. W. Dohrmann James Madison 
Frank J. Symmes 
Henry Brunner 
C. C. Moore 
W. A. Frederick 



Chas. Webb Howard 
Geo. C. Perkins 
Mark L. Gerstle 
E. A. Denicke 
O. A. Hale 



Gavin McNab 
Charles F. Leegre 
J. M. Vance 
Charles Nelson 



John M. Keith 
E. W. Runyon 
G. H. Umbsen 
R. D. Hume 



Frank Bros- 



UNION MADE GOODS 



Overalls . . . 65c Suspenders . . 50c 

Working Shirts . 50c Collars two for . 25c 

Dress Shirts . $1.00 Neckwear . . 25c 

Underwear . . 75c Hats . $1.50 and $2.50 

Cashmere Socks . 25c Famous ■' Crossett " 

Suspenders ... 25c Shoes . *2 50 and J3.50 



A nd a f ull lineof I iiiou Made Clothing 

We can show the label 

Cor.KEARNYS SACRAMENTO STS. 

San Francisco. 



M. A. MAHER 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS 

Boots, Tobacco, Cutlery, etc. 

United Workingrmen's Shoes. 

Also Agency for the Orthopedic Shoe. 



206 East St., near Howard. 

Phone Red 4 272. San Francisco. 



JOE HARRIS 

SEA-FARING MEN'S OUTFITTER 

Ready-Made Uniforms. 

Cap Making' a Specialty. 

5 JACKSON ST., NEAR EAST, 

Tel. John 3561. San Francisco. 



EXPRESSING 

Done by 

CHRIS. JORTALL 

Stand at Union Office, 
Southwest Corner East and Mission Sts. 



GREEN'S UNION STORE 

14 CLAY ST., one Block North of 
Market St., near Ferry. 

SAILORS' OUTFITS 

Best quality Rubber Boots and Oil 
Clothing, Shoes, Flannel Underwear, 
Hats, etc. 

ALL WITH THE UNION LABEL. 
We give you a square deal. 



C. J. BERENDES 

SOUTH SIDE HOTEL 

806 THIRD STREET, 
Between Berry and King Streets. 

The rooms are all newly furnished 
and the accommodations first class. 
Board and Lodging, $5 per week. All 
rooms single. 



D. EDWARDS 

4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

Wo sell the kind of Goods you require. 
Extra Strong Hickory Shirts x 
Best Overalls \ UN ION 

Good Lumber Shoes LABEL 

Stockton Flannel Underwear/ 
Also a full line of Gentlemen's Furnish- 
ing Goods and Hats. Look at our 
goods. You will be pleased. No trou- 
ble to show them. 



ODD FELLOWS CEMETERY 

AT COLMA 

Is now ready for interments 

Telephones West 806 aDd 
Church 5568 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 California Street, San Francisco. 



Guaranteed Capital and 

Surplus $2,500,098.42 

Capital actually paid up 

in cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, June 30, 1905... 37,738,672.17 

Board of Directors. 
John Lloyd, President; Daniel Mey- 
er, 1st Vice-President; Emil Rohte, 2d 
Vice-President; Ign. Steinhart, T. N. 
Walter, N. Ohlandt, J. W. Van bergen, 
F. Tillmann Jr., and E. T. Kruse. 



A. H. R. Schmidt, Cashier; Wm. 
Hermann, Asst. Cashier; Geo. Tourny, 
Secretary; A. H. Muller, Asst. Secre- 
tary; W. S. Goodfellow, General Atty. 



SMOKE 



RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNI0NJ/IADE 

RED SJEAL CIGAR CO. 

324 BATTERY ST., S. F. 




Suits for 
Sailor 
Boys 

Not every boy is a 
sailor — but every boy can 
wear a Sailor Suit — if he 
likes that style. We keep 
all ■ sorts of cute Suits 
which make a mother 
look so happy and proud, 
and the boy so cute and 
pretty. 

Suppose you try 

The Red Front 
Clothing Co. 

Market St., (opp. Powell) 
San Francisco. 

^^^^^^^^^-^ 



w 



STILL ON DECK 

ED. ANDERSEN 

7 EAST ST., NEAR MARKET 

Cigars, Tobacco and Notions 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY. 
LUMBER HOOKS. 



Union Boot and 
Shoe Store... 

Repairing Neatly Done 

C. LESTER 
12 Steuart Street. 



8 00T & S#o^ 
WORKERS UNION 



UNION 



STAMP 



factory No 



Domestic and Naval. 



It is said that a majority of the for- 
eign experts studying Isthmian Canal 
plans appear to favor a sea-level canal. 

Secretary of the Treasury Shaw has 
ordered an investigation of the Marine 
Hospital Service, which is charged with 
gross extravagance. 

The American fishing tug Harry G. 
Barnhurst was fired on and several of 
her crew wounded by the Canadian 
cruiser Vigilant in the middle of Lake 
Erie on September 17. 

The North German Lloyd liner Bre- 
men, bound from New York for Bre- 
men, arrived in Halifax harbor on Sep- 
tember 19 with a broken propeller shaft, 
in tow of the British tank steamer Luci- 
gen. 

The Clyde liner Huron, originally op- 
erated as a freight vessel, has been 
equipped at Cramps with passenger ac- 
commodations and will be operated on 
the New York, Charleston and Florida 
Line. 

It is reported that through the influ- 
ence of a German prince the Hamburg- 
American Steamship Company has ob- 
tained large contracts for the taking 
home of the Russian prisoners in Japan 
at $82.50 per head. 

The schooner V. H. Ketchum, bound 
from Duluth to Cleveland, burned on Sep- 
tember 10 off Parisian Island, Lake Su- 
perior, and two members of the crew 
were drowned while attempting to leave 
the burning vessel in a lifeboat. 

By the opening of a wireless tele- 
graph station on Sable Island, off the 
coast of Nova Scotia, and to the north 
of the regular transatlantic route ,in- 
coming vessels are now reported fifty 
hours previous to their arrival. 

The Norwegian bark Saga, Captain 
Haavig, from Mobile, Ala., May 24, for 
Buenos Ayres, arrived at Montevideo on 
September 17 with sickness on board. 
Four deaths occurred during the voyage. 
The nature of the sickness is not stated. 
The steamer Cumbal, which arrived at 
New York on September 19, five months 
overdue owing to having gone ashore in 
the Straits of Magellan, steamed stern 
first from Buenos Ayres in order to mini- 
mize the effect of the damage to her low 
plates. 

Eight of the crew of the Boston fish- 
ing schooner Joseph H. Cromwell, who 
were thought to be lost at sea in a fog, 
were afterward picked up. The master 
of the vessel committed suicide by jump- 
ing overboard, as a result of the sup- 
posed loss of his men. 

It has been learned at Washington, D. 
C, through official sources that the New 
York syndicate that bought the Novo 
Lloyd Brazileiro paid therefor $3,200,- 
000. The new company will give orders 
for the construction of eight vessels for 
its north and south coast lines. 

The wreck of the schooner Edward L. 
Warren was passed on August 15 in lati- 
tude 40.16 N., longtitude 04.34 west, by 
the German steamship Manhattan, which 
recently arrived at Algiers. The schoon- 
er was all washed out and some of her 
rigging was still hanging alongside. 

Abandoned and waterlogged, the three- 
masted schooner Charles A. Witler, of 
Baltimore, was sighted floating just 
awash in the Gulf Stream, in. latitude 
36.31 north, longitude 71 west, by Cap- 
tain Porter, of the United Print Com- 
pany's steamer Admiral Dewey, which 
recently arrived at Boston from Jamaica. 
The United States armored cruiser 
Colorado, in the recent trials over the No. 
1 mile course near Rockland, Me., at- 
tained the greatest speed ever made by 
an American warship on a trial cruise 
when manned by a naval crew. The 
cruiser made 22.22 knots in a four-hour 
run to sea, which is within .04 of the 
speed she made on her trial trip. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the "Wits. 

Though ""n. half the world doesnM 
know 
How the other half lives," no doubt 
The feminine half of thai half 

Is doing its best to find out. 



Laying Down the Law— " Tell me," 
said Die fweh young caller, producing a 
cigarette, "dors Bmoking go h 

■ < Yea," replied Mrs. Bright, promptly, 
"and so do the smokers." 

Blocked.—" I m afraid my hay fevt 
is coming on," said doeeman. trying 
to get some medical advice free oi 
charge. "Every once in a while 1 feel 
an itching in my nose, and then I sneeze. 
What would you do in a case like thai 
doctor J" 

••l feel pretty sure," replied Doetoi 
Sharp, "that I would sneeze, too." 

Shrewd Barber— "That barber sons 
to be doing a rushing business." 

"Tea. He has invented a hair tonic 
that smells exactly like gasoline." 

••I'.ut— er— I don't sec the point." 

"It tickles the vanity of his patrons. 
They go around smelling of gasoline. 
and this gives the impression that the] 
own automobiles. ' ' 



Crippled.— "Wow! " exclaimed the 
centipede, as the housekeeper swatted 
him with a dishcloth, "that'll cripple 
me sure." 

"She certainly did knock you off your 
feet," remarked the sympathetic fly. 

"Worse than that," groaned the vic- 
tim, "I'll bet she knocked fifty or sixty 
of my feet off me." 

Not in Daylight.- " I'.ut you are n 
always bothered with poor light. BJ 
you?" inquired the complaint clerk al 
the gas office. 

"Oh, no, not always," replied th 
quiet citizen. 

"Ah! 1 thought so; it 's only at per 
tain times that you notice it, eh?" 

"Yes; only after dark." 



The Bright Side.— " So you're a vel 
eran of the Rebellion?" said the young 
man, admiringly. "The war clouds wen 
thick about you when you were a youth. 
weren 't they?" 

"Yes," replied the veteran, as lie in 
dorsed the pension voucher he wished tl 
have cashed; "but they all had their sil 
ver lining." 



UNION 
MADE 



LUNDSTROM'S 

$2.50 Hats 



Made by 



PACIFIC COAST 

HAT WORKS 

1458 Market St., opposite Central 
Theater, and 605 Kearny Street. 



Country < irdera Solicited. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 



Bagley's 
Sun Cured 
Tobacco 



MTTOUTISIUL 

in. 




Save Front 
of Wrappers 
and Pouches 
for 
Premiums 



Every Package bears 
the Union Label 




Wonmade 
Clothin 




We are one of the pi «rs to adopt the union 

label of the Garment Workers. We manufacture all our clothing In 

Ur own workshops, and all Of it is made by union nun. OuM are 

,!, ,iy thoroughly union clothing stores in San Francisco. 

Other stores have only a few union-made lines to show union men 
when they call. But everything is union-made in our store. 

In purchasing here you buy direct from the makers at a saving 
of middlemen's profits. 

Ready-to-wear suits and overcoats $10.00 to $35. On. 

Made-to-order suits and overvoats $10.00 to $45.00. 

Garments can be purchased in either one of our two si,,,, s 



TWO LARGE 
STORES 



S. N. WOOD & CO. 

SAN FBANCISCO. 



Cor. POWELL, & ELLIS 
AND 740 MARKET 




James A* Sorensen Co. 

WATCHMAKERS, JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 



103 to 111 SIXTH STREET, 

Telephone Jessie _s-l 



Below Mission. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



fames jf. iSorvnjjn, 
S?*mi. mm* Z?rmm*. 



All Watch Repairing Warranted for two years. Eyes 
Tested Free l>y an Expert Optician. 

ALARM CLOCKS SEDUCED TO 45 CENTS. 

Open Evenings till 8 p. m. Sat unlays, 10 p. m. 

THE BIG JEWELRY STORE 



SMOKERS 



gee that this labei i in light blue I 
appears on tin- bos from which 
you are served. 



Issued by Authority oi the Cigar Makers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

UlllS Cfllillf.3. ThiUheCMjafv contained inih.i bo» hJ*» be*n rnjde Iry * f IfSt CUSS WorftBWn, 

d MtMBER Of THE CtCAAUMEU'lNURNATlOIUl UNION of Amine:*. *n orqirUJIx* devotefl fathead- 
^dncrnenl of the HOBAl MAURlAljivj iNltiUCUAvKVUfAW Of Thf CRAM Thtff*ore*e n 



All InJriaeemaU upon Uus utwi « 



n 



CdldCuiJ. President. 



PATRONIZE UNION INDUSTRY 

SHOKE UNION-MADE CIGARS THAT BEAR 
THE ABOVE LABEL 



(Otherwise known as SAM.) 

808 THIRD STREET 

Between King- and Berry Sts., San Francisco. 

GENTS', YOUTHS' AND BOYS* CLOTHING 

louts' Furnishing Goods, Mats. Caps, Trunks, Valises, h.-iks. etc, Boots, 

SI s, Rubber Boots and (| ii Clothing of all kinds. Everything strictly 

UNION MAJ'K. Seamen's outfits a specialty. 

If sou want lirst-elass goods at the lowest market price give me a call, 
Do not make a mistake — LOOK FOR THE NAMK AND N1I.MUER. 



Taylor's Nautical School 




506 



BATTERY STREET 

COB. WASHINGTON ST. 



U P S°Cultom House SAN FRANCISCO 



Oldest School on Pacific Coast, Largest 
and West equipped private Nautical : 
in the United states. Graduates prepared 
for the American and British Merchant 
Marine Examinations. Warrant officers ol 
the t'nited States Navy prepared for ex- 
amination for commissioned officers. Spec- 
ial course for cadets entering the United 
States Naval Academy and American Mer- 
chant Marine. 

Taylor's Modern Navigation, a book for 
both young and old navigators, Is now in 
the Library of oven Mail Steam- 

ship, in many Universities, and Is higlilv 
recommended by many noted navi 
Send for circulars and testimonials. 



Moving Sales 
At HALE'S 

Many departments art moving 
into larger quarters and crowd- 
ing other stocks. 

The order is imperative — 

WE MUST MAKE ROOM 



Alterations that are to win 
us so much greater conveniences, 
ami you a so much larger, better 
store when the nt w Hale build- 
ing is completed, are turning to 
your economy advantage in a 
large way now. 



Open at 9. Closed at 6 every day. 

MARKET ST., NEAR SIXTH 
San Francisco 



Union 
Clothing Store 

A i'i IMPLETE STt »CK I IF 

Sailors' and Firemen's Clothing 
and General Supplies. 



ERNEST COLBY 

17 j 2 Steuart Street, 

. t Market ,■-• Mission. Ban Francis,- 





ons 



TheTarcfest first class 
tailoriri^establishment 
on the Pacific Coast 

this ni&^sssKffli label 



\WP t 

I life 



Suits to' order 
from $16 00 up 

Trousers to order 
from$gOO up 

Samples and Self-Measurement Blanks 
~ free by mail 

•.CHARLES LYONS 
Kt LondonTailor f 

>2INtoket£l22KeanTys? 
® . F.~ 









SCOTTY'S MILWAUKEE 
SWEATERS & JACKETS 

Have stood the test against all 
e petltore. 

Lake Farin; Men All Know It. 

SWEATERS SENT BY 
1 1 All. FOB S3. 00 
Beware of Imitations. 

WILLIAM LISLE 

"SCOTTY" 

111 Menomenee St., Milwaukee. Wis. 








for the seafaring people of the world. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



Vol. XIX. No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1905. 



Whole No. 938. 




SAILORS' UNION FLOAT IN LABOR DAY PARADE AT SAN FRANCISCO. 

Loving Cup Awarded Sailors as Best Appearing Union in Parade. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Convention Call. 



Washington, D. C, September 15, 1905. 

To all Affiliated Unions. Greeting: Pursuant 
to the Constitution of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, yon are hereby advised that the 
twenty-fifth annual convention of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor will lie held at Old 
City Hall, in the city of Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, beginning at ten o'clock Monday morn- 
ing, November 13, 1005. and will continue in 

sion from day to day until the business of 
the convention has been completed. 
REPRESENTATION. 

Representation in the convention will he on 
the following basis: From National or Inter- 
national Unions, for less than 4,000 members, 
one delegate; 4.000 or more, two delegates; 

100 or more, three delegates; lfi.000 or more, 
four delegates; 32,000 or more, five delegates; 
64,000 or more, six delegates, 128.000 or more, 
seven delegates, and so on; and from Central 
Bodies and State Federations, and from local 
trade-unions not having a National or Inter- 
national Dnion, and from Federal Labor 
Unions, one delegate. 

Organizations, to he entitled to representa- 
tion, must have obtained a certificate of affilia- 
tion (charter) at least one month prior to the 
convention; and no person will be recognized 
as a delegate who is not a member in good 
standing "f the organization he is elected to 
represent. 

Only bona fide wage workers, who are not 
members of. or eligible to membership in. 
Other trade-unions, are eligible as delegates 
from Federal Labor Unions. 

|)i LEGATES MUST HE SELECTED AT LEAST TWO 
WEEKS PREVIOUS TO THE CONVENTION, AND 
THEIR NAMES FORWARDED TO THE SECRETARY 

iiiK American Federation of Labor im- 
mediately AFTER THEIR ELECTION. 

Ill LEGATES ARE NOT ENTITLED TO SEATS IN 
TIM. CONVENTION UNLESS THE TAX OP THEIR 
ORGANIZATIONS HAS BEEN PAID IN FULL TO SEP- 
;, JIBEB 30, 1905. 

The importance of our organizations and 
our movement, the duty of the hour and for 
the future, demand that every organization 
entitled to representation shall send its full 
quota of delegates to the Pittsburg Conven- 
tion, November 13, 1905. 

Do not allow favoritism to influence you in 
selecting your delegates. He fully represent- 
ed. 

Be ably represented by your best, most 
faithful, and experienced members. 
CREDENTIALS. 

Credentials in duplicate are forwarded to 
all affiliated unions. The original credentials 
must be given to the delegate-elect and the 
duplicates forwarded to the American Federa- 
tion of Labor office, 423-425 G. Street, N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 

The Committee on Credentials will meet at 
the headquarters of the American Federation 
of Labor six days previous to the opening of 
the convention, and will report immediately 
upon the opening thereof at Pittsburg; hence, 
secretaries will observe the necessity of mail- 
ing the duplicate credentials of their respec- 
tive delegates at the earliest possible moment 
to Washington, D. C. 

GRIEVANCES. 

Under the law no grievance can be consider- 
ed by the convention that has been decided by 
a previous convention, except upon the recom- 
mendation of the Executive Council, nor will 
any grievance be considered where the parties 



thereto have not previously held conference 
and attempted to adjust the same themselves. 

RAILROAD RATI S. 

The railroads have agreed to grant to dele- 
gates and friends attending the Pittsburg 
Convention of the American Federation of 
Labor a fare and a third for the round trip 
from all points to Pittsburg and return, on the 
certificate plan; that is. delegates and friends 
will pay full fare from their starting point to 
Pittsburg and receive from their home ticket 
agent a receipt for the full fare paid. This 
receipt or receipts must be presented to, and 
countersigned, by the Secretary of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor and the representa- 
tive of the railroad companies at the Pittsburg 
Convention. The certificates or receipts after 
being countersigned at Pittsburg will entitle 
the holder to a return ticket for one-third of 
the regular fare. Tickets must be purchased 
at least thirty minutes before the departure of 
trains from either point. 

Delegates and friends who desire to avail 
themselves of this special railroad rate may 
secure further information in detail upon ap- 
plication to their home ticket agents. 

Headquarters of the Executive Council will 
he at the Colonial Hotel. 

Delegates should notify chairman of the Ar- 
rangements Committee, Uriah Bellingham, 
42G Diamond street, Pittsburg, Pa., stating 
time of their contemplated arrival at Pitts- 
hurg and over which road they will travel. 

If there be any further information regard- 
ing the convention, or the arrangements for 
the convenience of the delegates, it will be 
communicated in a later circular. 

Samuel < Jumpers, 

President. 
Frank Morrison, 
Secretary American Federation of Labor. 



Eight-Hours in England. 

In 1894, the hours of Labor of about 43.HH') 
work people in certain Government factories 
and workshops were reduced to an average of 
48 per week. Details of the change were 
given in issues of the Gazette in that year. 

The War Office establishments affected by 
the change were the Ordnance Factories, Ord- 
nance Store Department, Inspection Depart- 
ment, Small Arms Inspection Department and 
Royal Army Clothing Department. The re- 
duced hours affected 18,641 work people in 
1894, whose working time was reduced "» :; i 
hour per week on the average. The bulk of 
the work people were employed at Woolwich. 

A recent communication from the War 
Office states that when the 48-hour week was 
first adopted it was anticipated that there 
would be a saving of time in stopping and re- 
starting work at the breakfast hour, work not 
beginning till after breakfast under the new 
system, and also a saving of light and fuel. 

It was also expected that a later hour of 
starting work would ensure greater regularity 
of attendance, that there would be an im- 
provement in the physical condition of the 
men and an increase in their power of produc- 
tion. 

The fact that the reduction in the hours of 
work had not reduced the output, or increased 
the cost of it, in private factories in which 
the experiment had been tried, also led tht 
War Office to assume that the cost of produc- 
tion would not be increased in their work- 
shop. 

It is stated that these anticipations have 
been justified, and that it is clear that no extra 



cost has been incurred by the public on account 
of the reduction of hours, nor has the output 
of work been diminished. On the other hand, 
the majority of workmen being on piecework, 
the average weekly earnings per man have not 
been sensibly altered, although piecework 
prices have not been increased. The day-work- 
ers received an increased hourly rate of pay 
to make their earnings per week of 48 bonis 
equal to those per week of 54 hours. It was 
not found necessaiy to increase the number 
of day-workers. 

The Admiralty establishments affected were 
11. M. Dockyards at home, the Royal Naval 
Ordnance Depots and H. M. Victualling Yard. 
The number of work people involved in the 
change of hours in 1894 was 24,263, and the 
average reduction of working time was la- 
bours per week. 

In the case of the dockyards, where the greal 
bulk of the workpeople affected were em- 
ployed, the number of hours had previously 
been 50 1-3 per week. Of the reduction of 
2 1-3 hours per week, nearly 1 j L . hours was 
effected on the Saturday by making the hours 
on that day equivalent to a half-day, instead 
of, as formerly, working till 1' p. m. with a 
half-hour stoppage for midday meal. 

A recent communication from the Admiralty 
states that the effect on the output of work 
was to some extent minimized by the with- 
drawal of certain privileges, viz: Allowances 
of 3 minutes to workmen for getting to their 
work after bellringing in the morning and 
afternoon, and certain half-holidays and time 
off previously granted without loss of pay. 
These privileges amounted in the aggregate to 
a time value of about one hour per week. This 
communication further states that it would 
not appear that the cost of production at th • 
dockyards since the introduction of the 48- 
hour system compares unfavorably with that 
which previously obtained, but to what ex- 
tent the cost has been influenced by the reduc 
lion of hours can not be definitely determined. 
Among the other factors of which account 
would have to be taken in making a compar- 
ison between the cost of production before and 
after the introduction of the 48-hour week 
are improvements in machinery and means of 
conveying stores within the dockyards, and 
other labor-saving methods, and also increases 
of pay in certain trades. No increases how- 
ever were made in piecework rates. — British 
i abor < iazette. 



According to advices from United States 
Minister Powell, at Port an Prince, the Min- 
ister of Public Works has presented to the 
Haitian chambers a draft of a proposed law 
approving a. contract giving to Messrs. Thim- 
ocles Lafontant, Hector John Joseph, and the 
.Minister of Public Works the right to erect 
lighthouses at Jacmel, Aux Cayes, Jeremie, 
Miragoane, Petit Goave, St. Marc, Mole St. 
Nicholas, Cape '1 iburon. and Port an Prince. 



The Government of Switzerland has planned 
to apply electricity to all the Government rail- 
way lines and to operate these lines from 
water-power plants, utilizing the mountain 
streams as a source of energy. Two expert;, 
sent by the Swiss Government to the United 
States to study electric-railway methods re- 
cently arrived at New York. 



In Iceland horses are shod with sheep's 
hern; in the Soudan a kind of sock made of 
•::mel's skin is used for the purpose. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



On the Atlantic Coast. 

(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions.) 
SgXSXSSXiXSXSXgr^^^ Cx^x*)®®®®®® ®S®®®®®®®®®®®$®(^ 



A "Timely" View. 

Commenting upon the attempt of the Penn- 
sylvania coal operators to have the anthracite 
miners' Certificate law set aside as unconsti- 
tutional, the New York Times takes the 
ground that that law confers a monopoly 
upon the miners and, among other things, 
says : 

A repetition of the enormous inconveniences and 
severe sufferings caused by the last coal strike 
might easily lead to an effective insistence on the 
establishment of the principle that when a certain 
group of men are for good reasons permitted to mon- 
opolize a certain kind of work, they shall be forced 
to settle their personal quarrels with their employers 
in some other way than by refusing to do that work. 
This would be an infringement on what is called a 
natural liberty, but like many another such infringe- 
ment it would only be the paying of a reasonable 
price for a special privilege. 

The Times, as usual in matters affecting 
labor, takes the wrong end of the argument. 
The Certificate law does not confer a monop- 
oly upon the miners, for the reason that any 
man can go into the mines and, by working 
two years as a helper, obtain a certificate as 
a miner. Again, it seems to be hardly neces- 
sary to point out, even to the benighted writ- 
ers on the New York Times ' staff, that the last 
thing the Pennsylvania Legislature had in 
mind when it passed the aforesaid law was to 
create a monopoly. Hence, the fact of its be- 
ing a monopoly, or not, is entirely outside the 
scope of the present controversy, which hinges 
upon the purpose for which the law was pass- 
ed, to-wit, the safeguarding of life. Such a 
law is manifestly of too much importance to 
the community to be considered from the self- 
ish viewpoint of vested property rights, or to 
be made an excuse for curtailing the personal 
liberties of men working under its protection. 



The difficulties experienced by the authori- 
ties in obtaining a sufficient number of non- 
union mechanics for the Panama Canal, place 
the Government between the horns of a dilem- 
ma. If the unions are recognized and the 
"Closed Shop" is established on the Isth- 
mus, the work will no doubt be proceed- 
ed with in good shape, but the Govern- 
ment will lose many of those friends who 
supply the sinews of war during political 
campaigns. On the other hand, if the 
"Open Shop" is recognized there will be 
but little work done on the Canal, and, 
worse still, the Government will alienate 
the friendship of those who cast the big- 
gest number of votes at election time. A dil- 
emma of this sort is almost as disheartening 
as a contretemps and a Hobson's choice in one. 



If President Roosevelt doesn't cease bother- 
ing the trusts pretty soon he may yet earn the 
distinction of being referred to in the school- 
books of the coming oligarchy as "the prying, 
probing, pragmatic president of the dark, dis- 
mal, demagogic labor age." 



The exigencies of human existence some- 
times make it necessary to destroy much that 
has been attained, that a little may be gained. 
Wars are mostly fought on that basis, and the 
French Revolution is the greatest historical 
demonstration of its truth. 



Ship Subsidies. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



A merchant marine which practically finds no 
place for itself on the great trade routes of the 
world, but is confined to sailing voyages in accord- 
ance with the subsidy conditions, is not a service that 
the American people could afford to maintain. — 
Boston Herald. 

It is one of the best features of the latest 
Ship Subsidy bill that it aims at giving the 
owners of sailing vessels an even chance with 
the large steamship corporations in securing 
Governmental subsidies; but this, of course, 
does not suit the corporation hogs, who, some- 
how, have come to think that nobody but 
themselves has a right to put his feet in the 
public trough. Neither does it seem to appeal 
to whatever may be the corporation equivalent 
for patriotism that the idea of the promoters 
of the Ship Subsidy bill in encouraging the 
building and operation of sailing vessels is to 
provide us once more with a natural ' ' nursery 
of the navy." All this, however, is only what 
may be expected from our "prominent busi- 
ness interests" and their press organs; but, 
the esteemed Boston Herald to the contrary 
notwithstanding, it may be laid down as an in- 
controvertible proposition that if the Ameri- 
can people can afford to "maintain" a mer- 
chant marine at all it must be one largely con- 
sisting of sailing vessels. The large steamship 
corporations have privileges enough already 
to maintain their own fleets; and they should 
be satisfied, one would think, that no discrim- 
ination has been made against them in the 
matter of subsidies. But, then, who ever 
heard of a satisfied corporation where special 
privileges were the issue? Which suggests 
that those who clamor most for privileges are 
not always those who most deserve them. 



Mr. C. W. Post has kindly treated his fel- 
low-citizens to another "Poster" in the press 
of the country. It has all the lack-humor sol- 
emnity of his other lucubrations, and is so 
palpably, name-blown-in-the-bottle, a product 
of the brain that gave us Grape Nuts and 
Postum as to preclude all possibility of find- 
ing any lofty sentiments in it. Of course, it 
contains the regulation assortment of semi- 
lugubrious and wholly-fierce denunciation of 
organized labor; but, as that is such an oft'- 
told tale, weariness would be about the first 
sensation experienced by the reader were it 
not for -the deliciously grotesque injection here 
and there of such stock phrases as ' ' the sacred 
mantle of liberty," "protection of the com- 
mon people," "save this fair America!" "in- 
dustrial peace," "patriotism," etc. Taken as 
a whole, however, this latest "Poster" seems 
to be lacking in the vindictive "snap" which 
characterized his earlier efforts in that line, 
and it is much to be feared that Mr. Post has 
over-trained himself in acquiring a mastery of 
genteel Munchausenism, and, as a result, has 
now gone just a little stale. 



Scanning the output of some of the Sunday 
newspapers, one begins to understand where 
Max Nordau got the ideas which prompt- 
ed him to write "Degeneration." It takes a 
well-poised person to assimilate that sort of 
stuff Sunday in and Sunday out the year 
'round without getting mental indigestion. 



Democracy in the Mess. 



Thomas E. Clinch, a master-mariner, writ- 
ing to the New York Herald, thinks that the 
discipline for which our merchant marine used 
to be (in) famous has gone to the demnition 
bow wows. He laments the fact that a 
"junior officer in gold lace and braid" must 
"sit down at the mess-table with quartermas- 
ters, oilers, water-tenders, carpenters and 
boatswains, the engine-room gang just off duty 
and not yet washed." "Boys," he com- 
plains, "on their first voyage to sea sing out 
to the gold-laced officer to 'pass down the 
stew ! ' Is it any wonder that there is no disci- 
pline on our ships? The men never think of 
saying, 'Yes, sir,' or 'No, sir,' when address- 
ing an officer." 

Yes, it must be pretty tough on the gold- 
laced gorramighties of the bridge to have to 
mess with the overalled denizens of the main- 
deck and the stokehold. Still, the Stars and 
Stripes are the emblems of a great republic 
dedicated to democracy, and the American 
warship has been legally declared to be a part 
of the territory of the United States. Jack 
is proverbially as good as his master when he 
is ashore, and there does not seem to be any 
good reason why he should not be nearly as 
good when on board ship. Besides, the ship's 
officer who can not maintain discipline without 
wrapping himself up in exclusiveness and 
putting on haut ton airs is lacking in the first 
aid to discipline — the power to inspire respect 
in others. 



Homer Folks, Secretary of the New York 
State Charities Aid Association, recently ad- 
dressed the seventh annual session of the 
Quaker Hill Conference, at Rawling, N. Y., 
on the subject of child labor and, among 
other things, said : 

Child labor is not only a cruel injustice to the 
children; it is uneconomical, shortsighted and wasteful 
for the community. It is mortgaging the future for 
the benefit of the present generation. Child labor 
is never cheap for the community ; it is an inexcusable 
waste of opportunity to create good citizens. 

All of which is as true as Gospel, and the 
man who doesn't think so will be sure to get 
left when the rewards for good citizenship 
are handed out at the end of this mortal 
journey. 



Our political spellbinders and ex-officio 
" workingmen's friends," are tuning up their 
allocutionary organs for an active fall cam- 
paign. It's all to the loose, however, for "in 
vain doth the fowler spread his net in sight 
of the bird," which in latter-day English 
means that we workingmen are "on to the 
curves" of our "friends." 



P. Jensen, the Mobile agent of the Marine 
Firemen's Union, reports that the scabs are 
leaving the United Fruit Company's steamers 
as fast as they arrive, and are being replaced 
with true-blue Union men, as per agreement 
with the company. 



Almost any fcol can be eloquent when he 
has something to say, but it requires an adept 
in platitudes to launch into impassioned ora- 
tory when he has nothing to say. That's why 
our political spellbinders are so well paid. 



(Continued on page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Home News. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



i the Treasury Leslie M. 
Shaw lias announced that he will resign 
from the Cabinet on February 1, 

Mayor Tom L. Johnson, of Cleveland) 
(i., has bi urinated for the 

time by the Democratic party of thai 
city. 

The total number of deaths from yel 
fever at New Orleans, La., up to 
September 24, is o07; total number of 
cases, 2,831. 

The i ■ and Republican pari iea 

.if San Francis used against the 

Union Labor party in the munii 
campaign. 

The work of civilian physicians 
amining re I he Army has p 

so unsatisfactory that their service has 
been entirely dispensed with. 

It. is announced that the Commercial 
Cable Company's new lines to China and 
Japan will be laid and in operation on or 
e April, 1906. 

oods on the Mississippi and Missouri 
Rivera and their tributaries ha 
enormous property losses, and badly de- 
layed railroad traffic. 

Tin- honorary degree of honor of Doc- 
tor of Laws has been conferred bj 
lumbia I ersity on Baron Komura 
and Sergiua Witte. 

of War Tat't and Congres- 
I party arrived at San Francisi 
September ^7, on their return from a 
tour of the Philippines. 

Five men were killed and more than 
twenty injured by a rear-end collision on 
the Pennsylvania Railroad at Paoli, neai 
Philadelphia, on September 25. 

The First National Bank of Orrville, 
O., recently closed its doors by ordi 
the Controller of the Currency, on 
count of a continuous run on the insti 
tution. 

Representative John N. William 
of Oregon, Dr. Van Gessner and Marion 
R. BiggS were convicted in the land 
naud cases at Portland, Or., on Sep 
tembei 27. 

A tunnel under the Hudson River, be- 
tween .Manhattan and Jersey City, was 
completed on September 29. The tun- 
nel was begun twenty-three years ago, 
I nit work was long abandoned until rec- 
ently. 

Thomas E. Sauls, who recently cele- 

d the one hundred and second 

anniversary of his birth at Nebb City. 

Mo., claims to have personally met 

President of the United States, ex- 

cept the first and last. 

The Government does not want any 
more negro soldiers, and has so advised 
the country. The only way a negro can 
get into the army from now on is in 
the event of war, and that at present 
is a remote possibility. 

President Roosevelt has notified Mayor 
Behnnan, of New Orleans, that he will 
go to NTev Orleans on October 24, if the 
people desire him to come; that he will 
make a second trip, if they wish him to 
com. later. 

David Wark, the oldest legislator in 
the world, died at Prederickton, New 
Brunswick, recently at the age of 101 
years and 6 months. Senator Wark had 
a record of sixty-four years' service as a 
lawmaker in Canada. 

Perkins, a white 'woman, was 
to ten years in the peniten- 
tiary at Magnolia, Mo., on September 
Us, for marrying and living with a 
i. Judge Wilkinson, in passing sen- 
tence, said he regretted that he could 
not make the punishment heavier. 

Cards belonging to the American sup- 
l to be William Remes, who jn 
overboard from the Hamburg-Ami 
liner Prinz Oscar as she was entering the 
harbor of Palermo, Sicily, recently, indi- 
cate that he was Charles Westhafer, of 
Cleveland, 0. The evidence so far found 
shows that the man was deranged. 



BOYS, READ THIS 

And see how you can become a property owner and make money by investing 
: , little of what you earn every month. Don't get into the habit of spei 

all vou earn, but sa Cor a rain) day. San Francisco red a 

lid opportunity twenty years ago. Sat the growing San Fran 

cisco of the South to-day. Don't forget that We offer you lots on graded 
is with ci i walks and curbs, trees planted and wati i laid In 

eptlonally low terms of $25 < [10 per month 

!. Remember, by Hie time you have finished paying foi your lot ii 
will have more than doubled In value. Don't let this opportunity slip by, but 
or to the new postofllce. 

PECK & ANDERSON, San Pedro, Cal. 



BRILLIANTS 

CLOTH I NG STOR E 
SAN PEDRO. CAL. 

We make a Specialty of Handling only the Best Goods Manufactured 

for Seamen. 

YOU WILL FIND THE UNION LABEL ON OUR GOODS ALSO. 



LIPPflAN BROS. 

CLOTHING AND SHOE STORE 

We Carry the Finest and Most Up-to-date maKes 
of Union Made Goods 

WIEDWALO BLOCK, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD WINES AND 

LIQUORS. 

BOTTLERS OF SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES BEERS. 

All -t San Francisco prices. 

We buy I "i Kentucky Distilleries and our California Wineries. 

Seafaring men invited to inspect our stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



.JOHN HELANDER 

Dealer in 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

Groceries, Provisions, Cigars 

Fourth Street, near Beacon, 
San Pedro, Cal. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO, 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

I 'ealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and all San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



C. L. M IN SON 

Dealer in 
CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE Tin: OLD man a CALL. 

Front . Street, opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN J'KI IRI I, CAL. 



UNION CIGAR AND 
TOBACCO STORE 

ELIAS WEBERG, Proprietor. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Union-Made Cigars, Tobaccos, Pipes, 

Notions, Etc. 



CIGAR AND TOBACCO STORE 

JACOB OLSEN, No. 324, Prop. 



THE BEST CIGARS IN TOWN. 



Store on Fourth Street, near Beacon, 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



J. P. SYLVA, Jr. 



SEASIDE MARKET 

CAPTAIN McVICAR and B. I* BAAND 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



Groceries, Hay and Grain, also Green gjj^ Pjp^ J[ Q ^ g& a jjj[ ^5^3 of all Kinds 
Fruits and Country Produce Meats inspected by U. B. Inspectors. 

BEACON ST., bet. Fourth and Fifth. FRONT STREET, SAN PEDRO. CAL. 
Phone No. 114. SAN PEDRO, CAL. s Supplied at Lowest J: 
'I .I'plione 203. 



FRED SVENDSEN 

/ NION EXPRESS 

AND DRAY CO. 

STAND AT FRONT STREET 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



When making purehases from our adver- 
tisers, always mention the COAST 
Seamen 's JOURNAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 
Undertaker and Embalmer 

FOURTH ST. 

Bet. Front & Reacon Sts., San Pedro. 



PEOPLE'S BARGAIN STORE 

Headquarters for UNION MADE CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing: Goods, Boots and 

Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 

Outfits. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 

Ent., Front and Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 




UNION LABEL 



OF THE 



UNITED HATTERS 



OF N. A. 



'J^rJC - (1 « SU >'nu are buying a FUR HAT, either soft or 

^GiSTErfe^ in 1* *'":;.,'" A' that t ; i , e , Gen,,i,le Union Label Is sewed 

four edge? exlctlv th« Jm- J- h ! Ge " u " ie ; " io » >••'>'>•' Is perforated on the 

n his fosslslion and \e?J?f aS a P osta S. e stamp. If a retailer has loose labels 

^l^ot^^AT^i^^.^n 1 ^^- The J ° hn R Stetson 

MARTIN EAWLOR, S^eU^/l^a^y^rBo'o^^.w'SS: £ £ 



LETTER LIST. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 
Absolonsen, Ole M. Johnson. Bmll-1676 

Ardeliann, J. Johnson, Louis 
Andersen-515 an, C. 

Andersen, A. B. Juhnky. William 
Andersen, Chas. G. Kahlstrom. C. 

Andersen, Joseph Karlson-859 
Andersen. Wllhelm Karlson, Gus. E. 

•Andersson-727 Klalm, K. 

Anderson, Olaf Knutsen, Knut 

Anderson, W. G. Krallman, Alfred 

Anderson, Geo. Krietsamtn. Ferd. 

Anderson, Gust. Krogstad, Eugene 

Anderson, S. Ladelane. John 

Anderson. W.-991 Lfutier, John 

Andreasen, N. S. Larsen, Eouis-536 

Angelbeck, G. Larsson, Kdw. 

Appelgren, John Lavison, Henry 

Arkerlund-1263 Llnd, Aug. A. 

Arntsen, Erik Lanatiolm, Nestor 

Augustin, A. L. Llngsn, M. C. 

Bakke, John-517 Eund. Charles-599 

Blierath, Mux Lundgvlst, John 

Berggren, Gustaf Maatta, John 

Bergqvlst, J. A. Magnussen-1147 

Berntsen, O.-1280 Magnuson, C 

Blanemo. Osear Matthew, J. 

Blohie. Ee Henry McAdam, J. 

Brandt. Win., pkg McHume, W. H. 

Bratrud, O. M. M< K'enzie. Jas. T. 

Bregler, Friedrich Meyer. Ernst 

Carlson, August Michael. Walter 

Carlson. Fred Mikkelsen-101 

rarlson, Julius Mikkelsson, Alfred 

Carlson, J.-388 Mjornes, Arne 

Clausen. A. E. Nelson, Frank 

Bortram, Wm. Nelson, Julius 

Brandt. William Nielsen. K. N. 

Chamberlln, E. C. Nielsen, Mad. P. 

Cheodore, Bodiou Nielson, N. G. 
Chrlstensen, Harry Nielsen, Niels Chr. 
Christiansen, Ludv. Nlsson, James 

Christopherson, Nvlund. John 

Carl Oerterling, Emil 

Comerford, E. Olsen. Erik-726 

Danielsen, Ernst Olsen, Hans C. 

Daring, C. Olsen, John B. 

Davey, C. Orafr. D. 

Diener, Alik Pearson, Oskar 

Puis. I. -547 Pedersen-1015 

Ed son, Frank Perouwer, G. 

Eklund, W. G. Petersen, Chris. 

Edlund. J. A. Petersen, O. 

Eliason. K. A. Pettonen, K. H. 

Engelbright. H. Petterson. Auel 

Erlkson, Auel A. Pierson. Robert A. 

Erlandsen-529 Poulsen, M. P. 

Foldat. John P.asmussen. Adolph 

Frandsen. F.-388 Rasmussen, Edw. 

Gibson, Chas. R. Rasmussen, Victor 

Gronvall. Johan F. Reag. Stephen A. 

Grunboek. Johan Redehman-505 

Gunlaeh. John Reid. James-326 

Gustatfson, .T.-432 Rjetad. S. J.-1355 

Gustafson, A. F. Rosenblad, Karl 

Gustafson, Oskar Rudl. A. M.-677 

Gustavsen, Ben Samsio. S. 

Hansen. Adolf Samuelsen. O. 

Hansen. Andrew Sandel, I. outs 

Hansen. A. G. Sandon-1579 

Hansen, August Sanltone, J. 

Hansen. Chas. G. Saunders, Carl 

Hansen, H. J. Simonsen, Alfred 

Hansen. J. Smith, C. H. 

Holtte, John Smith, Pat. 

Hansen, J. P.-1381 Smith. Paul 

Hansen. T.aurits Smitsh, H.-Reg. 
Hansen. Theodoi letter P. O. 

Haraldsson-1204 Sodergvlst, Otto 

Henriksen. K. Soderlund, Andrew 

Tsaekson, G. E. Sorensen. Soren 

Jaeobsen, Peder Staef. Ears. 

Jansson, A. -351 Stornes, And. O. 

.Tansen, Fred-12Sl Straehan. John 

Jansson, Edward J. Strand, Ednar 

Jensen, Oluf Sunderman, Gustav 

Janson, Oscar Svenssen, Hans M. 

Jensen, Niels Olaf Svensson, Nlcolaus 

Jens, otto Swanson, C. 

•Teshke, Hans Swansson. G.-1316 

Jnhansen, E. H. Thorn. Edmund 

Johansen. E. W. Tomask. Math. 

Johansen, Geo. W. Verbrugge, P. 

Johansen, Gunen Verzona, Felix 

Johansen, Jorgen Westerholm, Aug. 

Johansen-1591 Wilson. Edward 

Johansson-1287 Wilson, P. E. 

Johansson-1204 Zugehaer, Alex. 



Union Made by Union Maids 




INFORMATION WANTED. 

Wo Larsen or Wo Curtis Larsen, age 
24, last heard from nt San Fran 
March, 1907. Nev a of import 
him at the 1'. s. Shipping Commission- 
er 's Office. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






Pacific Coast Marine* 



m^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s^^j^^^ ^^^^^^^^ 



Twenty-one false naturalization papers were de- 
clared void in the Superior Court at San Francisco on 
September 29. 

The French bark Joinville, for some days on the 
overdue list, has arrived at Havre, her destination, 151 
days from New Caledonia. 

Captain Thomas Quinn, late first-mate of the Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company's steamer Curacao, died at 
San Francisco on September 24. 

News has been received at Honolulu, T. H., of the 
brutal and treacherous murder of W. Finlayson, a 
South Sea trader, by the crew of the cutter Savoin, off 
the Solomon Islands, in August last. 

The tugboat Neptune, recently arriving at Sin 
Francisco from Baltimore for the United States Ma- 
rine Hospital Service, was formally inspected on Sep- 
tember 29 by a board of Government officials, and 
found to be in first-class condition. 

The steam-schooner Santa Barbara went ashore at 
Del Mar, ninety miles north of San Francisco, on Oc- 
tober 1. All hands and passengers were saved, and 
the vessel was afterward floated in a badly damaged 
condition. 

The British ship Falls of Garry, at Port Townsend, 
Wash., on September 29 from Panama, reports a sea- 
man named Isadore Nelson died of intermittent fever, 
and a seaman named John Thompson was killed by a 
fall from aloft. 

Captain William Jones, of the British ship Bur- 
mah, was arrested on September 29 by the Federal 
authorities at San Francisco and charged with hav- 
ing permitted the escape from his ship of an alien 
seaman afflicted with an infectious disease. 

Captain John H. Binder, of the Great Northern 
liner Minnesota, will have to vacate his citizen 's 
papers, according to a report on his case now on the 
way to Washington, D. C, from Secret Service Agent 
John H. Helms, at San Francisco. 

A telegram received at San Francisco on September 
29 from London reported that the American ship 
Acme, bound from Baltimore for Manila, and which 
went ashore in Prince 's Channel, between Prince 's 
Island and Java, has been floated. 

The four-masted schooner Muriel, 483 tons, Captain 
Wickender, from Cray's Harbor to San Pedro, laden 
with 700,000 feet of lumber, crashed into the Govern- 
ment breakwater at the entrance of San Pedro (Cal.) 
harbor on September 28, and was greatly damaged. 

The French ship Leon Bureau arrived at San Fran- 
cisco on September 28, 264 days from Leith and 245 
days from Newcastle, Eng. The vessel put into Mon- 
levideo some months ago in distress, sailing thence in 
July. 

The Pacific Mail liner Korea broke the record be- 
tween Yokohama and San Francisco on her last pas- 
sage from the Orient. The passage occupied ten days, 
eleven hours and five minutes; total distance, 4,536 
miles; average hourly speed, 18.2 knots. 

A telegram received at San Francisco on September 
25 from London reports that the British ship Kahane, 
from Rotterdam for San Francisco, put into Monte- 
video with Captain Scott sick and with the loss of sev- 
eral sails. 

The United States steamer Gedney arrived at Vic- 
toria, B. C, on September 29, from Alaska after com- 
pleting the season 's work surveying in Alaskan waters. 
Captain Dickson said the steamer was not endangered 
when ashore at Wrangel Narrows and sustained no in- 
jury by grounding. 

Captain Thomas Clarke, an Englishman, millionaire 
miner and stock raiser of the United States of Colom- 
bia, has had constructed at the Fulton Iron Works, in 
San Francisco, a sidewheel steamer of peculiar design 
for the navigation of the rivers of the South Ameri- 
can republic. 

The Chilean bark Alta, from Port Gamble, Wash., 
for Manila, P. I., with a cargo of lumber, is reported 
to have gone ashore in the latter port in a gale on 
September 26. It is said that the Alta lost most of 
her cargo of lumber before reaching the Philippines, 
in a storm off Guam. 

The German yacht Seestern has returned to Hono- 
lulu, T. H., from a special cruise to the Caroline and 
Marshall islands, carrying food supplies to these 
groups, which were devastated by a hurricane on April 
19 last. The people of these islands were found to be 
in a destitute condition. 

From the Okhotsh Sea the barkentine S. N. Castle 
arrived at San Francisco on September 27 with 208,- 
000 codfish, a record catch. A cargo of codfish 
amounting to 175,000, was brought from the Okhotsk 
by the schooner W. H. Dimond. Both vessels were 
thirty-one days on the run home. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at San 
Francisco on October 1 : German bark Edmund, 130 
days from Port Talbot for Iquique, 25 per cent. 
British bark Lalla Rookh, 195 days from Brisbane for 
Falmouth, 90 per cent. British bark Principality, 151 
days from Junin for Rotterdam, 55 per cent. 

The Oceanic liner Alameda, from 8nn Francisco for 
Honolulu, went ashore at Fort Point, in San Francisco 
harbor, during a heavy fog on September 30. The 
crew and passengers were landed safely and a large 
pari of the cargo was discharged in good condition, 
but it is believed that the vessel will be a total wreck. 
The War Department will probably approve of a 
bridge across Carquinez Strait, in Ran Francisco har- 
bor, from a point between the Nevada docks and Port 
Costa to a point five blocks east of the ferry slip on 
the Benicia side. It must be a pier bridge, sixty-five 
or seventy feet in height with at least 400, and possi- 
bly 500, feet between the channel piers. 

Captain Bailey, formerly in command of the Ameri- 
can ship Susquehanna, and later an officer of the Pa- 



cific Mail liner Siberia, has returned to San Francisco 
from the East, to take command of the ship W. F. 
Babcock. Bailey is one of the best of the Maine ship- 
masters known in the latter port, and his return to the 
Coast is welcomed. 

A report has been received that the whaling bark 
Gayhead was in Behring Sea on August 1, with two 
right whales and 218 barrels of sperm oil. Whales 
are reported at that time to be very scarce. No re- 
ports have been received from the Alice Knowles or 
the other whalers following in the path of the Gay- 
head, but all are expected to make good catches before 
arriving at San Francisco within the next few weeks. 

Captain Thomas Boyd, of the steam-schooner Gypsy, 
has explained the wreck of that vessel on September 
27 as due to the display of a red light by a construc- 
tion company in the vicinity of Monterey. Captain 
Boyd mistook the light in question for that usually 
displayed on Monterey wharf, and headed for it, with 
the result that the Gypsy went ashore and had to be 
abandoned. 

Waterlogged and in bad condition generally, the 
schooner Sotoyome arrived at San Francisco on Sep- 
tember 25, two days from Albion. The Sotoyome sail- 
ed from Albion on the 23rd for San Pedro, and when 
only an hour out sprang a leak. The engineer of the 
auxiliary power reported that the pumps would nut 
work, and before the Sotoyome was at sea three hours 
the vessel was full of water. 

Four libel suits for pilotage were filed in the United 
States District Court at San Francisco on September 
29, against the steamer Queen. Captain M. Anderson 
claims $108.60 for pilot services on the Queen on 
August 14; Captain M. Tyson sues for $109.60, alleged 
to be due for similar services rendered on September 
17; Captain John von Helms sues for $111.91, and 
Captain G. Scott for $110.16 for alleged services on 
August 18 and September 2, respectively. 

Two new steamers are under construction in Europe 
for the Kosmos line, plying between Hamburg, Lon- 
don, Mediterranean ports and the west coast of South 
America and San Francisco. They are to be named 
Setos and Siis. Two twin-screw passenger and freight 
steamers and three fine modern freighters are also to 
be built for the Kosmos line. The company is re- 
ported to be making money on the long run to San 
Francisco, despite the fact that there is a loss in oper- 
ating the steamers between the South American points. 

The schooner Wing and Wing returned to San 
Francisco on September 29 from Cape Mendocino 
where, for several weeks past, she has been lying by 
the wreck of the Norwegian steamer Tricolor and at- 
tempting to save some part of the big collier. Four 
winches and two anchors and 210 fathoms of chain 
constituted all that the schooner could save from the 
wrecked steamer, which has broken into three part". 
and disappeared from sight. The Tricolor was bound 
fur Lndysmith to San Francisco when she ran ashore 
some weeks ago with a cargo of coal during a dense 
tog. 

The French warship Meurthe has returned to Hono- 
lulu, T. H., from the New Hebrides, whither she went 
on a punitive expedition. Two natives were arrested, 
charged with the murder about a year ago of Cap- 
tain Richard Pentecost and six members of his native 
crew on the recruiting schooner Petrel. Captain Pen- 
tecost was bound to a tree, while the natives hurled 
spears at him. While still alive they threw him into a 
shark-in tested lagoon and he was torn limb from limb. 
The party of marines which captured these two mur- 
derers was itself attacked by the natives, and one ma- 
rine was killed and one wounded. The arresting 
party, when attacked, fired on their assailants and 
killed four. 



DIED. 

James Carter, No. 827, a native of Scotland, aged 
iO, drowned in Nakuck River, Alaska, June 15, 1905. 

Oluf Johansen, No. 1407, a native of Norway, aged 
29, died in Samoa, July, 1905. 



■ 



HOW'S THIS? 



We offer One Hundred Dollars Reward for any case 
of Catarrh that cannot be cured by Hall's Catarrh 
Cure. F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, O. 

We, the undersigned, have known F. J. Cheney for 
the last 15 years, and believe him perfectly honorable 
in all business transactions, and financially able to 
carry out any obligations made by his firm. 

Waldintg, Kinnan & Marvin, 
Wholesale Druggists, Toledo, O. 

Hall 's Catarrh Cure is taken internally, acting di- 
rectly upon the blood and mucous surfaces of the sys- 
tem. Testimonials sent free. Price, 75c. per bottle. 
Sold by all Druggists. 

Take Hall 's Family Pills for constipation. 



F. R. Wall, who was for many years an officer in 
the United States Navy, is now practicing marine law 
in San Francisco. He gives claims of all seafarers 
careful attention. Merchants' Exchange building, 
California street, near Montgomery; rooms 429-430. 
I 'hone Main 5985. 



Bagley's Sun-Cured is now packed in pouches and 
the fronts will be received assorted with labels from 
the foil packages, for premiums. 



Cost of Living in Germany. 

In a long, detail report on the cost of living 
in Germany, United States Consul Harris, 
writing from Chemnitz, says that foods are 
comparatively dearer in the Empire than in 
the United States. For example, coffees 
range in prices from 24 to 48 cents per half 
kilo, or 1.1 pounds; tea runs from 48 to 95 
cents; sugar, granulated, from 0.078 to 0.0S5 
cents; rice and barley from 4 to SU cents; 
butter from 32 to 33 cents; oleomargarine, 
much of which is manufactured, from 17 to 
21 cents ; milk is a trifle less than five cents a 
quart; fresh meats sell for about 19 cents a 
pound; bacon, 21 cents; ham, 29 cents; tur- 
keys, 24 to 28y 2 cents per 1.1 pounds; potatoes 
from 95 cents to $1.07 per 112 pounds. 

It is hardly necessary to say that no very 
substantial part of the Empire's working 
people pay any such prices, for their wages 
do not permit of such. The food of the masses, 
made up in large part of fish, herring, cheap 
meats, potatoes, and the cheaper forms of 
vegetables, are high enough to hinder anything 
like luxurious living. Herrings sell for 0.023 
cents each; salmon for 48 cents to $1.19 per 
1.1 pounds. The foregoing items and figures 
have been picked from Mr. Harris's report for 
the purpose of pointing out the most sug- 
gestive and significant features of the whole. 

In regard to meats, Mr. Harris says: The 
question of cheap meat for the poorer classes 
is beginning to agitate the Empire. As was 
to have been expected, the tariff laws enacted 
in favor of the landed proprietors have not 
produced the desired effect. Germany pro- 
duces about 75 per cent of her own food 
stuffs. It was claimed that the remaining 25 
per cent coidd also be produced by a better 
system of intensive farming, if somewhat 
facilitated by a tariff which would protect the 
home meat and grain markets. Germany's 
population is 60,164,000, an increase of 800,- 
000 in a year. 

In this connection, a leading Chemnitz 
paper publishes pages from a Avorkingman 's 
daily food expense book. The yearly outlay 
for rye bread was $44.88 ; white bread, $20.34 ; 
meat, $9.90; sausage, $7.64; bacon, $10.85; 
butter, $21.27; eggs, $4.10; milk, $18.84. The 
family consisted of father, mother, and several 
children (unfortunately, the exact number 
and age of the members of the family is not 
given). 

In this connection Consul Harris calls at- 
tention to the fact that the importations of 
all kinds of meats from the United States I'd I 
off from 47,243 tons in 1898, worth $9,448,600, 
to 4,342 tons, worth $889,882, in 1904. This 
is due to the severe laws regarding meat in- 
spection. Other countries, however, are af- 
fected, notably Denmark, Holland, Russia, 
and Austria-Hungary. 



From the 21st to the 26th of June, 1906, 
a large agricultural exposition is to be held at 
Berlin, which will also comprise a special di- 
vision for preserved-food articles, such as 
products of the dairy, dough, potatoes, f raits, 
wines and extracts, meats, beer, etc. Money 
prizes, diplomas, and medals will be awarded. 
In order to test the preserving capacity of 
these exhibits they will be sent to the Tropics, 
and as the journey will last several months, 
parties desiring to enter such exhibits must re- 
port by August 31, 1905, to Deutsebe Land 
wirtsgesellschaft, Berlin S. W., Uessauer 
Strasse 14. 



Demand the union label on all prorbrets. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 
JOURNAL^ 



Published Weekly by 

THE SAILORS' UNION OP THF PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



W. M\CARTHUR.... Editor | P. SCHARRENBERG, Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail. - $2.00 | Six months, $1.00 

Single copies, 10 cents each. 
Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Satur- 
day noon of each week. 

To Insure a prompt reply correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
-!lass matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
southwest corner East and Mission streets, San 
Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writers name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, 



OCTOBER 4, 190o. 



THE FLOAT AND THE CUP. 



This week the Journal presents its readers 
with a counterfeit presentment (i. e., a cut) 
of the float exhibited by the Sailors' Union of 
the Pacific in the Labor Day parade at San 
Francisco and the loving cup presented to that 
organization as the best appearing union in 
the parade. The professional eye will note 
that the float is a faithful model of a full- 
rigged ship, fixed up to beat the band and rid- 
ing her cradle "like a thing of life," while 
everybody can see that the loving cup is a 
beautiful piece of workmanship, well worthy 
tin; occasion which it commemorates. 

The Sailors' Union is proud of its success in 
this connection, the more because of the fine 
spirit shown by all the other unions, in ac- 
knowledging the merit of the judges' award. 
In turn, the Sailors agree with the verdict of 
the judges in awarding honorable mention to 
the Laundry Workers, Garment Cutters and 
Machine Blacksmiths. These organizations 
made a splendid showing, one that is the more 
commendable because of its favorable com- 
parison with that of the veteran Sailors. Pos- 
sibly, when the latter are placed under the 
handicap to which they would be subject 
under some rules of competition, the organi- 
zations in the "honorable-mention" class will 
be able to win a prize for themselves. In such 
event, the winner will receive the congratula- 
tions of the Sailors, given as readily and as 
warmly as are those extended to the Sailors 
on the present occasion. 

Of course, the Sailors value the loving cup 
on account of its intrinsic value and beauty ; 
but they value it even more on account of the 
sentiments associated with it. These senti- 
inents express more than appears upon the 
surface. The sentiment typified by the cup 
on behalf of its donor, the Red Front Cloth- 
ing Company, is that of respect for organized 
labor; the award of the cup to the Sailors' 
Union expresses the respect of the judges for 
that particular organization. The judges, 
being representative citizens, expressed the 
sentiment of the community. To gain the es- 
teem of the public was one of the original 



aims of the men who founded the Union. It 
is therefore with no small degree of pride that 
the present generation of members acknowl- 
edges the concrete testimony of their success 
in this worthy ambition. The gift of our 
friends will be long preserved for the admira- 
tion and inspiration of future generations of 
seamen and trade-unionists generally. 



TIN-] SOUND FISHERIES. 



Ed. Rosenberg, organizer of the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America, who for 
the past two years has been at work among 
the fishermen of Puget Sound, reports that 
concerted efforts are being made to nullify 
the law passed by the last session of the 
Washington Legislature, providing for a 
thirty-six-hour closed period every week. Or- 
ganizer Rosenberg writes the Journal, stat- 
ing the facts of the situation, and inclosing a 
copy of his letter to Governor Mead. Both 
communications are herewith published, as 
follows : 

Editor Coast Seamen 's Journal — The fishermen of 
Puget Sound are hard at work to compel the salmon 
Canners' and trapmon 's combine to obey the laws 
passed at the last session of the Washington State 
Legislature, for the protection and continuance of 
1 1 io salmon industry of Puget Sound, seriously threat' 
ened by the short-sighted greed of men and companies 
(iwning (raps. These laws were enacted last spring, 
after a long and bitter fight. The Fishermen's Pro- 
tective Union of the Pacific Coast and Alaska spent 
considerable money in literature and general agitation 
to acquaint the people of the State with the real 
conditions of the Puget Sound fisheries. The enthusi- 
astic support of the trade-unionists of the State and 
of the public generally, in the shape of widely signed 
petitions and resolutions, turned the scale in favor of 
the fishermen. Now the trapmen, with the assistance 
of the State Fish Commissioner, are trying to set 
aside the law, but prospects for a victory to our side 
are good. 

The press of the State during all this time has 
aided us and continues its support. I have had several 
interviews with Governor Mead and have received as- 
surance of assistance. 

The following letter to Governor Mead, fully ex- 
planatory of the situation here, was printed in full 
in the Seattle Post-Tntclligeneer, of September 17: 

In compliance with your request to submit In yon 
in writing data relating to the thirty-six-hour weekly 
eloaed season by the salmon fish traps on Puget Sound, 
I herewith submit to you the following: 

The law distinctly provides that during the weekly 
closed Beason "the tunnel and front part of the pot 
of all fish traps shall be raised to high water mark 
to permit salmon and other fish to swim freely and 
without hindrance in any direction." The fish trap 
owners are not doing this. Some of them are plac- 
ing, during the closed season, a piece of webbing in 
Front of the tunnel; "thers are dosing the tunnel by 
raising it. This practice allows the traps to corral 
the fish in the hearts and practically fish during the 
closed season. Very few fish, once they are in the 
hearts, find their way out, the trap being so construct- 
ed as to always lead the fish toward the tunnel. That 
is the contention of men who have worked on traps 
for yeare and thoroughly understand how they operate. 
The weekly dose. I season thus only affects the gill- 
ii. tl. is and purse-seiners, for when their gear is in 
the water it is fishing. 

It was fully shown at the last State Legislature, 
which enacted this law, that a thirty-six-hour weekly 
eason is absolutely necessary to save the sal- 
mon industry of Pugel Sound. The traps catch about 
90 per cent, of salmon caught on Puget Sound, the 
-lines, t_'ill nets ami set nets the remaining 10 per 
cent. Thus it can l.e seen that our salmon industry 
iv doomed unless the law can be enforced on the traps. 

This law is necessary, is practicable, anil is fair 
to all interests involved, except that it could ami 
should be improved at the next legislature by changing 
l lie time from when to when the thirty -six hours 
should run, the gil] miters now, in many places where 
they can only fish nights, losing two nights out of the 
seven. When the provision that the traps should raise 
the tunnel and front pari of the pot to high water 
mark was placed in the Megler bill by a member of the 
Fisheries Committee of the House at a meeting of that 
committee, leading trap owners of Puget Sound and 
their attorneys were present and raised no objection. 
Otto Schultz and Thomas Wright, of the Oarlyk Pack- 
ing Company, both owners of traps, told mo before 
this provision was placed in tin tfegler bill that it 
certainly could be complied with. N.>u the trapmen 
claim that to comply with this provision would en- 
danger their traps, and give that as their reason for 
the violation of the law. This is subterfuge, pure 
and simple, called forth by short-sighted greed that 
already has decreased and continues to decrease our 
salmon industry and threatens its complete extinction. 
Even if by complying with the law the traps during a 
heavy gale were in danger, which men fully acquainted 
with tlie traps deny, Hie trill-netters ami purse seiners 
continually run the danger of loss of nets through 
.ml other causes: why, then, should the traps 
not risk, if risk there were, some loss to obey the 



law enacted for the protection and saving of industry? 

I luring the last three mouths T have \isite.l most 
of the fishing grounds of Puget Sound, and I am 
compelled to state that Fish Commissioner Kershaw 
has not only not used the powers of his office to en- 
force the thirty-aix-hour closed season law, but has 
ruled that the trapmen need not raise the tunnel and 
front part of the pot to high water mark to permit fish 
to swim into the outer waters of Puget Sound — that 
to raise the tunnel is sufficient. » » » 

Now, your Excellency, it appears plain to me from 
the most careful investigation and consideration of 
the facts brought to my knowledge, that Fish Com- 
missioner Kershaw is both unwilling and unable to 
enforce the thirty-six-hour law on the traps; that if 
the law is to be enforced and the aalmon industry of 
Puget Sound preserved, the trap men must be given 
to understand ihat they must obey the law of the 
State as well as the other fishermen; also that no 
fish commissioner can pervert the plain meaning of the 
law to permit the traps to fish as long as a salmon 
is running. You, Governor, can and no doubt will, 

•<• the matter is fairly and fully placed before you, 

aid the fishermen of Puget Sound to preserve our 
salmon fisheries,for your letter of July 27 instructing 
the Fish Commissioner to enforce the weekly closing 
law and pointing out to him the way it can and ought 
to be done, has assured the fishermen that they have 
in you a strong and fearless friend. But it is also 
known to all fishermen that the Fish Commissioner, 
since the receipt of the letter from you, has not 
changed his policy of allowing the traps to fish dur- 
ing the closed season as long as they pretended to obey 
the law by hanging a piece of webbing in front of 
the tunnel or closing same. In this connection it is 
necessary to state that to permit the closing of the 
tunnel only to be called enforcement of the law is to 
invite the violation of the law. With the fish gather- 
ing in the hearts during the closed season in large 
quantities in a heavy run, if the tunnel is lowered 
for a brief period, most of the fish as a rule will 
rush into the pot ; then the tunnel can be raised again. 
This takes only a few seconds. A man is usually 
stationed at the tunnel, and a few turns of his hand 
would close the tunnel. Under this construction aside 
from the fact that the trap is even with the tunnel 
closed, it woidd take a deputy on each trap to pre- 
vent the violation of the law. If the fish, howeveT, are 
not permitted to gather in the hearts, as the law pro- 
vides, violation of the law would be difficult and more 
readily detected. * • » » 

To fully demonstrate the bad faith of the salmon 
combine when it states that it desires the preservation 
of the salmon industry, and hence had the Earles bill 
introduced at the last session of the Legislature, 
providing for the closing of sockeye fishing for 1906 
and 1908, and for a weekly thirty-six-hour closed sea- 
son for other years, I only need to mention that in the 
Earles bill no provision as to how the traps should 
obey the law was inserted. Had the Earles bill passed, 
the "traps lawfully could have fished as they do now, 
ami only the purse-seiners and gill-netters, the owners 
of floating gear, could have been stopped from fish- 
ing. The present practice of the trapmen fully proves 
this. 

Mr. Kershaw strongly urged the passage of the 
Karles bill, and when that bill was defeated, tried to 
have the present thirty-six-hour law so amended that 
it should apply to the tributaries of Puget Sound, as 
il read. His amendment would have made the law- 
apply only to the few gill-netters and set-netters in 
ill rivers. Comment on that action and his 
present practice is certainly unnecessary. 



Der Seemann, the organ of the German Sea- 
men's Union, reports splendid progress in or- 
ganizing work. At tlie end of the first quar- 
ter of this year the membership in good stand- 
ing was 3,117. At the close of the second 
quarter there were 3,667 members in good 
standing, an increase of 550 paid-up members 
during three months. The treasury of the 
Onion was augmented by 3,534 marks during 
the same period, the total bank account at the 
end of the second quarter being 103,349 marks 
($25,837). Der Seemann urges the organized 
seafarers of Germany to continue and renew 
I heir efforts in the near future, to the end 
that all men who make a livelihood on the sea 
may unite and hotter their eonditions. 



No settlement has been reached between the 
Northwestern Brewers' Association and the 
United Brewery Workmen. When a settle- 
ment is made the fact will be announced by 
the latter. In the meantime our readers can 
hasten the end of the dispute by refusing to 
drink any heer that does not hear the red label 
of the United Brewery Workmen. 



Every dollar expended on the union label 

is worth, in practical results, ten 1i s the 

same amount expended on strikes and boy- 
cotts. 



mm 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



EIGHT-HOUR DAY WINS. 



The article, "Eight Hours in England," 
reprinted on page 2 of this issue, from the 
British Labor Gazette, official publication of 
the British Government, is an important con- 
firmation of the claim that the eight-hour day 
is profitable to the employer as well as to the 
employe. The experience of the British War 
Office, during a ten-years' trial of the shorter 
workday, while important in itself, is admit- 
tedly but a repetition of the experience of pri- 
vate concerns. Summed up, the experience of 
the War Office under the eight -hour day (in- 
volving a reduction of nearly six hours per 
week, or one hour per day) is that "no extra 
cost has been incurred by the public on account 
of the reduction of hours, nor has the output 
of work been diminished." Piece-work em- 
ployes have suffered no reduction in wages, 
while day-workers "have received an in- 
creased hourly rate of pay to make their earn- 
ings per week of forty-eight hours equal to 
those per week of fifty-four hours. ' ' This au- 
thoritative statement of the case, important as 
is its showing, makes no mention of the far 
more important results of the shorter work- 
day, i. e., the material results to the commu- 
nity, in the shape of the increased demand for 
and consumption of good things, and the 
moral results to the individual worker, in the 
shape of enlarged domestic and intellectual 
spheres. 

Another striking illustration on the same 
subject comes to hand in the form of an arti- 
cle in the Scientific American, entitled "A 
Government-Built Battleship," being an ac- 
count of the progress made by the New York 
Navy Yard in the building of the United 
States battleship Connecticut. The Scientific 
American unqualifiedly indorses the action of 
Congress in awarding the contract for the 
Connecticut to a Government yard, and advo- 
cates the continuance of the policy of Govern- 
ment shipbuilding. In the course of its inter- 
esting remarks, the Scientific American says: 

The results thus far achieved have more than fulfilled 
expectations. The Connecticut has not only been built 
faster, and considerably faster, than any previous 
battleships constructed for our navy, but she is to-day 
slightly ahead of the sister-ship at the Newport News 
(private) yard, and this in spite of the fact that great 
enthusiasm prevails at the Southern yard, and there is 
an unspoken understanding among the workmen to 
push the boat along and have her completed ahead 
of the Government-built ship. In the report of Au- 
gust 1 of this year, the Connecticut was 0.83 per cent 
ahead of the Louisiana. During the month she has 
advanced 2.48 per cent toward completion ; so that on 
September 1, 86.15 per cent of the work was done. 
The indications are now that she will be ready for 
her preliminary trials in the spring of next year, and 
ready for her final sea trial two or three months later. 

It should be understood that the "great en- 
thusiasm" which prevails at the private con- 
tractors' yard is merely another term for 
sweating the men in order to discredit the 
work of the Navy Yard. Whichever of these 
vessels be first at the end of the race, it is a 
moral certainty that the Connecticut will 
prove the better piece of workmanship. As 
the Scientific American says, the Navy De- 
partment, by its work on the Connecticut, 
"has buried once and forever the old popular 
fiction that the construction of warships in a 
Government yard is necessarily slow and ex- 
pensive, and the work indifferently done." 
These evidences of success under the eight- 
hour system, afforded by the two leading Gov- 
ernments of the world, make the efforts of 
those employers (the National Typothetae, 
for instance) who would adhere to the longer 
workday look more ridiculous than the efforts 
of Mrs. Partington to sweep back the Atlan- 
tic. In the former, as in the latter case, the 
contest is unequal. The laws of Nature are 
bound to prevail. Again we say, the eight- 
hour day has come to stay ! 



THE ALAMEDA WRECK. 



The unfortunate wreck of the Oceanic liner 
Alameda, almost in the Golden Gate, will be 
regretted by every seaman who has admired 
that vessel on account of her graceful lines 
and fine seagoing qualities. The proverbial 
good luck of the twin sisters, Alameda and 
Mariposa, seems not to have altogether de- 
serted the former in her mishap, since all on 
board were landed without wetting a foot or 
even turning a hair. A feature of the wreck 
that has elicited general comment was the con- 
duct of the crew, which was fully up to the 
best ideals of seamanship. There was no ex- 
citement, no rush for the boats. Every man 
Jack kept his head and used it to good pur- 
pose. Of course, the Alameda's crew were all 
union men, from master down to deck-boy. 
The fact that the weather was comparatively 
fine at the time of the disaster does not de- 
tract from the credit due the crew, when con- 
trasted with the conduct of other crews in 
similar circumstances and in the same locality. 
At the present moment we recall three such 
cases, those of the Oceanic, Rio de Janeiro and 
Algoa. In the cases of the two first-named 
craft many lives were lost; in the latter case 
the vessel pulled away from the rocks after a 
very close shave. Each of these vessels was 
manned by Chinese, and it is a matter of rec- 
ord that the loss of life in the cases of the 
Oceanic (or rather City of Chester, which ves- 
sel was sunk by the Oceanic) and Rio de Ja- 
neiro, and the narrow escape of the Algoa, 
were due very largely to panic among the 
Chinese seamen (?). This fact has been de- 
cided beyond debate by the United States Su- 
preme Court, in its decision in the Rio case, 
that tribunal having ruled, for the first time 
in its history, against the limitation of liabil- 
ity on the part of the shipowner, on the 
ground that the Rio, having been manned by 
a Chinese crew unable to understand or obey 
the orders of the officers, the Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company must make good the 
losses suffered as a consequence of the wreck. 
The contrast between these cases reinforces 
the old truth that while Chinese and other 
forms of cheap labor may do well enough in 
fine weather, in an emergency white seamen 
are needed, and needed badly. 



Demand the label of the United Garment 
Workers (see fac-simile on pages 11, 12, 14 
and 16) when purchasing oilskins, shirts, un- 
derwear, ready-made suits, etc. ! The label 
stands for white, union labor, as against Chi- 
nese and sweatshop products. 



Those who are disposed to criticise Carne- 
gie's selection of an epitaph should bear in 
mind two mitigating circumstances, to wit, a 
very limited choice of friendly, not to say 
complimentary, remarks, and a literary judg- 
ment that doesn't amount to anything more 
than it can afford to pay for. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION. 



Headquarters, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 20, 190!). 
General condition fair. 

Daniel Sullivan, Secretary. 
15 Union st. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' AS- 
SOCIATION OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters, New York, N. Y., Sept. 20, 1005. 
Shipping and prospects good. 

H. P. Griffin, Secretary. 
ICG Christopher st. 



* 


OFFICIAL. 


# 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 2, 1905. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 7:30 
p. m., J. Pearson presiding. Secretary reported ship- 
ping fair. A Quarterly Finance Committee was 
elected. Delegates were nominated for the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union convention, at Cleveland, O. . 
Nominees wishing to have their names placed on the 
ballot are requested to notify the Committee on Bal- 
lot not later than Friday, October 6. The election 
will be held in the regular meetings on or about Oc- 
tober 16. 

A. Furuseth, Secretary. 

S. W. cor. East and Mission sts. Tel. Main 5397. 



Tacoma Agency; Sept. 25, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fair; men still 
arce. 

H. L. Petterson, Agent. 
3004 McCarver st. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 25, 1905. 
Shipping fair. 

P. B. Gill, Agent. 
1312 Western ave. P. O. Box 48. Tel. James 3031. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 25, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Prospects uncertain. 

Wm. Thorbeck, Agent. 
114 Quincy st. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 443. 



Shipping brisk 



P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 25, 1905. 
Wm. Gohl, Agent. 



Portland (Or.) Agency, Sept. 25, 1905. 
Few coasters in port. Men scarce. 

D. W. Paul, Agent. 
40 Union ave. Tel. Hood 352. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 25, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping good; prospects 
fair. 

C. Sorensen, Agent. 
222 C street. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 566. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 25, 1905. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

Harry Ohlsen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 774. 



Honolulu (H. T.) Agency, Sept. 18, 1905 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

A. COLDIN Agent. 
P. O. Box 96. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' AS 
S0CIATI0N OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 28, 1905. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 7:30 
p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary reported 
shipping fair. It was decided to elect two delegates 
to represent the Marine Cooks and Stewards of the 
Pacific at the next convention of the International 
Seamen's Union. Nominations to be made at the 
next regular meeting, October 5, at Headquarters and 
the branches, to be voted upon for four consecutive 
meetings. 

Eugene Steidle, Secretary. 

54 Mission st. 



Seattle (Wash.) Agency, Sept. 21, 1905. 
Shipping dull; quite a few men ashore. 

II. RoTUSCiiiLD, Agent. 

San Pedro (Cal.) Agency, Sept. 21, 1905. 
Shipping good ; prospects good. 

G. Lloyd, Agent. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, III., Kept. 25, 1905. 
Shipping fair. 

V. A. Olandf.r, Assi. Secretarj 
123 North Desplaines st. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS OF THE 
GREAT LAKES. 



Eeadqtjarters, Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 19, 1905. 
Situation unchanged. 

II. B. Walker, Secretary. 
55 Main st. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Sept. 21, 1905. 
Shipping fair. 

Wm. 11. Frazier, Secretary. 
IViA Lewis st. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



TrTTTT7TTTTTTT7TTTTTTTTTTTT-TT 



. . . . .. ., .^^xsxsxjxjxs^exj^^xjxjx*^^ 

On the Great Lakes. 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 
. .,...-; ...;.; 



, ai^SxSxSxfrSxjfr^txjxSxSxi^Sx?*^ 




More Big' Boats. 

The much and long talked of 600-foot ves- 
sel has come and two steamers of that class 
will be in ( mission on the Lakes next sea- 
son. The first order for a freighter of that 

type was ph d recently when H. Coulby, 

Presidenl and General Manager of the Pitts- 
burg Steamship Company, closed a contract 
with the American Shipbuilding Company Eor 
two steam 

The new boats, which will cost about $900,- 
000, will be 600 Eeet over all, 580 feet keel, 58 
feet beam and 32 fed deep. They will be 
thirty-one feci longer and two feet wider and 
one foot deeper than the steamers E. 11. < lary, 
William E. Corey, George W. Perkins, and 
Henry C. Prick, which are known as the "Big 
Four" of the Steel Trust fleet. They are the 
largest carriers en the Lakes and hold all the 
ore cargo records. 

The new boats will be built at South Chi- 
cago and work on them will be started as soon 
as the repairs that are being made at the ship- 
yard are completed. The material for the big 
ships will be furnished by the Illinois Steel 
Company, which is a branch of the Steel Cor- 
:on. About 4,200 tons of steel will be 
used in the construction of each of these boats. 

Tie 600-footers will carry about 1,300 tons 
more than the four big steamers and their cap- 
acity on twenty feet of water will be 12,000 
tons. Mr. Coulby figures that the new boats 
will make twenty-one trips a year and that in 
full season they will move pretty close to 600,- 
000 tons of ore . 

The new boats will have same power as the 
"Big Four" steamers. They will have triple 
expansion engines with cylinders 24, 39 and 
of. inches, with 42-inch stroke. The boilers will 
also be of the same size, but the new boats may 
have three instead of two boilers. They will 
he fitted with Ellis & Eaves draft. 

"Our big ships that came out this season," 
said Mr. Coulby. "have done so well and 
bandied with so much satisfaction that we de- 
cided not to increase the power of the new 
steamers. ' ' 

The construction and general design of the 
new boats will be the same as the ''P>isj Four" 
steamers, but the 600-footers will be heavier 
and stronger in order to care for the addi- 
tional length. 

The holds of the vessels will be built on 
what is known as the straight side hopper up 
for a distance of nine feet. 

The holds will extend in one continuous 
length from the collision bulkhead forward to 
the forward boiler room bulkhead aft, with 
one .screen bulkhead in the length of the same 
extending from the tank to the spar deck. In 
'he hoppers there will be no obstructions of 
any kind, the sides of the vessel and the deck 
of the vessel being carried by arched girder 

Construction, which extends from one side of 
the vesse] to the other about six feet dei 
Hie center and spaced every twelve feet apart 
in the center between hatches. 

There will hi ial accommodations for 

passengers. The cabins will be of steel, with 
pilot house, owner's and captain's quarters 
located forward under and en top of ihe fore- 
castle deck, and the quarters for the balance 
of tin crew will be located on the spar deck, 
aft of the machinery space. They will he lux- 



uriously fitted out in hardwood and the best 
of furnishings. 

The growth of Lake shipbuilding has 
been fostered wonderfully. Up to 1900 the 
500-foot vessel was only talked of, but in that 
year A. B. Wolvin, of Duluth, ordered four 
Is of that class and for a time it was 
thought that the limit had been reached. The 
four boats were the John W. Gates, James J. 
Hill. William Edenborn and the Isaac L. Ell- 
wood. They held the records for several years 
and in 1904 Mr. Wolvin again set the pace 
when he ordered the steamer Augustus B. 
Wolvin. which is 560 feet over all and 56 feet 
beam. 

Last year, Mr. Coulby, who is the Lake rep- 
resentative of the United States Steel Corpora- 
tion, ordered the "Big Four" steamers which 
are 9 feet longer than the Wolvin and the two 
600-footers that he closed contracts for recent- 
ly will be the largest and most economical 
coarse freight vessels afloat. 

The length of the Lake freighter has in- 
creased 100 feet in five years, and il will be 
many years before such a gain is made again 



Report on Sevona WrecK. 

William Phillips, chief-engineer, and Adam 
Fiden. first-assistant engineer, the only sur- 
viving licensed officers of the ill-fated steamer 
Sevona, which was wrecked during the recent 
gale on Lake Superior, have made an official 
report of the loss of the boat, and it has reach- 
ed the office of Steamboat Inspectors Mona- 

ghan and Chalk. The report, which was mailed 
IVoni Buffalo, after relating the fact that the 
steamer left the port of Superior at 6 :03 p. m., 
September 1, 1905, loaded with iron ore bound 
for Cleveland, Ohio, goes on to state that until 
one hour past Outer Island all went well. It 
was at this stage of the trip that the first 
trouble was experienced. Engineer Phillips 
continues : 

"Owing to the heavy sea the steamer was 
turned around and we headed for shelter. 
At 5:45 I was in the engine room with the 
second-engineer and received a signal for half 
speed and answered the same. About ten 
minutes later the steamer struck bottom. She 
struck on the Sand Island shoal. There was 
no further communication between the cap- 
tain and me after that. After the steamer 
struck the after crew, consisting of fireman, 
deckhands and engineers, lowered the life- 
boats (two metal boats) ami remained by the 
steamer in the boats until about 11:30. We 
then left the steamer and landed safely on 
shore about 5 o'clock p. m., September 2, 1905. 
Si earner is a total loss; value $220,000. Seven 
of the crew were drowned. Captain D. S. Mc- 
Donald, First-class Pilot Louis Darwine, Sec- 
ond-class Pilot George Hamilton, Wheelsmen 
Xels Salverson and O. Valette, Watchman Gus 
Drews ami another watchman, name un- 
known." 

It is possible thai the above report will have 
to be more in detail, as nothing is said of the 
Eorward crew. 



The stea r Melbourne, bound from Mon- 
treal to Hamilton, with a general cargo, was 
burned to the water's edge near Trenton, 
Ont, on September 20. The crew had a nar- 
row escape. She is a total loss. 



Lights for Shoals. 

The fine marine charts which have been 
posted up in the Ashland Daily Press office 
all summer have been closely studied by every 
shipmaster that has been at that port, especial- 
ly during the recent past. These charts, by the 
way, are published by the Government, and 
are the finest and most accurate in existence. 
"The recent marine disaster on Sand Island 
Shoals," said Captain W. C. Jordan of the 
Canadian si earner Leafield recently, "empha- 
sizes the need of gas buoys on Sand Island 
Shoal, York Island Shoal and Bear Island 
Shoal. You will see by these Government 
charts that these shoals are entirely under 
water, and had there been a gas buoy on Sand 
Island Shoal, the Sevona would have been 
saved together with the crew. 

"There should also be a light on the north- 
eastern tip of .Michigan Island, for the pres- 
ent light is of no use for vessels coming from 
the northeast, and most of them come that 
way to Ashland. 

"Third, there should be a gas buoy in Che- 
quamegon Bay to give outgoing vessels their 
proper range in going out. The old time ship- 
masters will say that there is no need of it, 
but a great many of us do not regularly enter 
Chequamegon Bay, and a glance at the Gov- 
ernment chart and the direction we have to 
take, will show there ought to be a gas buoy 
there. It is of more importance than the La 
Pointe light. 

"And lastly, there ought to be a harbor of 
refuge in the Apostle Islands probably in the 
region of Little Sand Bay, directly south of 
Sand Island, with proper lights showing the 
way in." 

What Captain Jordan says, many other 
Lake shipmasters say. It has long been con- 
tended that there should be gas buoys on Sand 
Island Shoal, Bear Island Shoal and York 
Island Shoal, but probably owing to the depth 
of water on each shoal, and the difficulty of 
keeping the buoy in place, none has ever been 
placed there. These slmals are at present un- 
marked except on the charts, and as there is 
considerable water covering the rocks, many 
vessels without cargoes have probably passed 
over them, without even discovering their 
danger. 



Membership Booh Found. 

An ordinary seaman's membership book, 
containing letters and a Norwegian seaman's 
book, belonging to Johan T. Sjostrom, No. 941 
P., was recently found in South Chicago. 
Owner can have same by applying to Val 
Duster, Lake Seamen's Union, Smith Chicago. 



General Manager B. W. Parker, of the 
While Star line, announces that his company 
will spend $15,000 to begin improvements on 
Sugar Island, which the line has purchased 

as a resort for Toledo excursionists. 



The small two-masted schooner Elizabeth, 
of Sturgeon Bay, was recently blown on the 
sandy beach near Peshtigo. Owing to shallow 
water tugs have been unable to get near the 
boat to render assistance and she will probably 
go to pieces. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Marine Notes. 



The steamer Nottingham arrived at Ashta- 
bula, 0., recently with the captain and six sur- 
viving members of the schooner V. H. 
Ketchum. 

Duncan McMillan has resigned as agent of 
the Goodrich Transportation Company, at 
Milwaukee, and has been succeeded by W. P. 
'Connor. 

Arrangements are being made by the White 
Star line to have the steamer Arundel run be- 
tween Toledo and Detroit this fall, as was the 
custom last year. 

The schooner V. II. Ketchum, which was 
recently destroyed by fire on Lake Superior, 
was insured for about $25,000. She was 
formerly a steamer. Her machinery was 
taken out a few years ago and placed in the 
steamer R. "W. England. 

The old steamer Badger State, which was 
converted last spring from a passenger boat 
into a floating poolroom, has been sold by 
Hugh R. Havey to Henry N. Loud, the lum- 
berman of Ausable, Mich. The old boat will 
be used as a lumber carrier. 

Notice is given that on September 12, it 
was reported that the Maumee straight chan- 
nel entrance gas buoy showed a fixed white 
light. Its proper characteristic, a fixed white 
light of ten seconds' duration, followed by an 
eclipse of ten seconds, will be resumed as soon 
as practicable. 

The crew of the barge Nelson C. Holland 
had a run for their lives when the Holland 
recently crashed into the center pier of the 
wrecked Portage Lake draw-bridge. They 
succeeded in getting away from the boat be- 
fore she sank in thirty feet of water, but left 
all their belongings behind. 

The schooner V. H. Ketchum, which was 
burned on Lake Superior, was the first ore 
vessel to enter Conneaut harbor. On Septem- 
ber 21, 1892, she brought in a cargo of 2,271 
tons of ore and the harbor was then in such a 
condition that it required two tugs to get her 
to the only dock. A big crowd was on hand to 
see the entrance. The Ketchum was then a 
steamer and was in command of the late Cap- 
tain William S. Mack. 

Fourteen new plates were required to fix up 
the steamer Stephenson, of the Steel Trust 
fleet, which was rammed by the barge Roeb- 
ling recently. The Stephenson was at the 
Superior shipbuilding yard for ten days, and 
has just left. The steamer D. M. Clemson is 
receiving thirteen new plates at the same yard. 
A number of her plates were damaged in the 
ice last spring, but the owners managed to 
keep her in commission. The wooden steamer 
City of Naples is at the same plant for a gen- 
eral recaulking. 

John Morgan, a sailor, has begun suit in the 
Federal court at Duluth against the Pittsburg 
Steamship Company, demanding damages to 
the amount of $2,000 as the result of an al- 
leged assault made upon him by John Surney, 
first-mate of the steamer Matoa, of the Pitts- 
burg line, on which Morgan shipped at Ashta- 
bula on September 1. According to Morgan's 
story he remained with the boat until she 
reached Two Harbors, when he asked leave. 
It was then, says Morgan, that he was assault- 
ed by Surney. He asserts the mate used an 
ax on him and that his injuries were so serious 
as to necessitate -a wound on his head being 
sewed up by a physician. Morgan further al- 
leges that the master of the boat, H. Geroux, 
made no attempt at a rescue and did nothing 
that would cause Surney to desist. 



TONAWANDA LETTER LIST. 



Anderson, H. B. 
Andrasen, Nills S. 
Atcheson, Fred 
Brown, Clarence J. 
Bergorstrom, Oscar 
Baase, Paul 
Brown, Fred I !, 
Bajidon, Fred 
Brown, Joe 
Brinniers, Heer K. 
("arisen, Carl 
Coburn, J. 
Cobb. James W. 
Cunningham, John 
Clare, Frank 
Conger, Joseph 
Champine, Tony 
Cattanach, Ralph 
Christensen, Chas. 
Curire, John 
Corran, F. 
Charlson, Karl A. 
I >a nielsson, .1 
Donaldson, Chas. B. 
Daugherty, .lames 
Druoks, Louis 
Engulson, J. M. 
Fjeldsgaard, Adolf 
Furtaw, Parker 
Farran, James 
Glanz, Edw., Jr. 
Gillgren, Peter 
Green, J. S. 
Gay, Harry B. 
Housen, Thergrlm 
Hansen, Martin 
Heeley, Edmond 
Hillman, J. R. 
Hansan, A. 
Hansen, Karl Otto 



Herring, S. A. 
Hillman, Henry 
Hanson, P. 
Jacobson, August 
Johnson, Joe 
Johanssan, Carl 
Karlsen, Karl A. 
'Kmidsen, H. 
Kozlaske, Michael 
Karlsson. G. P. 
Leeland. W .M. 
Lundgren, Victor 
Lafarge, John 
Labo, Peter 
Maese, Max 
Mathiasen, Oscar 
Magnassan, C. J. 
McGrath, R. 
McLawby. Ed. 
McDonald MuraocR 
MeLeod, Thos. 
McNamara, Michael 
Nicholson, Andrew 
Milsen, Nils. 
Nilsen, Welenius 
Pedersen, A. H. 
Palmatier, George 
Pederson, N. A. 
Omonsen, Tollak 
Rankin, Jac. \V. 
Sullivan, S. P. 
Sarsen. Pick. 
Shannon. H. P. 
Stalls. William 
Sheldon, H. S. 
Tovatt, Frank 
Van Antyerp, Chas. 
Waters. Frank 
Young, James 



CONNEAUT LETTER LIST. 



Bjnmlund. Axel 
Badgley, Frank. 
Caldwell, Jnn. D. 
Critchlev, Albeit 
Davis, Thos. 
Devney, Will 
Dahl, Ernst 
Fuller, Archie 



Grant, Wm. 
Henderson, D. J. 
Hill, Harry 
Ingman. Gust. 
Isaacs, Freeman J. 
McNeeley. Matt. 
Paulson, Hans 
Wadswortb, Frank 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Charles Stracban, member of the Lake Seamen 's 
Union, is requested to communicate with Dr. IT. Wilson, 
General Hospital, Conneaut, O. 

Emil Lundberg, of Boda, Oland, Sweden, last heard 
from in San Francisco in 1S99, is inquired for bv G. 
R. Lambert, 158 92d st., So. Chicago, ill. 

Janus Perry, a member of the Lake Seamen's 
Union, is inquired for by his brother. Address, Fred 
Perry, 133 Clinton street, Milwaukee, "Wis. 

Milton Brigjrs Wiley is inquired for by his mother, 
at Philadelphia, Pa. Any information concerning his 
whereabouts should be sent to Lake Seamen's Union, 
121-123 North Desplaines street, Chicago, 111. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lakes District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

121 and 123 North Desplaines Street, Chicago, 111. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 



BRANCHES. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South- 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936, R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, O. 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 171 East River Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1295. 

TOLEDO, 719 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6981. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 27112. 
AGENCIES. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street. East 

Telephone 3724. 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone Peoples 4615. 

BAY CITY, MICH 919 North Water Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 94 Hamilton Street 

SUB-AGENCIES. 

MANITOWOC, WIS 809 South Eighth Street 

ERIE, PA 107 East Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 

SANDUSKY, 1107 Adams Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 931 Military Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 



UNITED STATICS MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL.; DETROIT, MICH.; CLEVELAND, O. 



KELIKF STATIONS. 



Ashtabula Harbor, O. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Erie, Pa. 
Ei ca n.'i ba, M Ich 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton. Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistel, Mich. 



Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette. Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, < >. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, 'Wis. 

Toledo, O 



We Don't Patronize. 

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Br ^ a ?~ M v Kinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo.; 
National Biscuit Company. Chicago III 

Cigars — Carl Upman of New York City; Kerbs 
Wertheim <v- Schiffer, of New York City; The Henry 
George and Tom Moore. 

Flour — Washburn, Crosby Milling Co., Minneapo'is 
Minn.; Kelley Milling Co., Kansas City, Mo 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City. 

Meats — Kingan Packing Company, of Indianapolis 
Ind. 

Pipes — Wm. Demuth & Co., New York. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 



CLOTHING. 
Buttons — Davenport Pearl Button Company. Daven- 
port, Iowa; Krementz & Co., Newark, N. J 
Clothing— N. Snellenberg & Co.. Philadelphia, Pa ; 

Clothiers' Exchange, Rochester, N. Y. Strawbrid°-e 

& Clothier. Philadelphia, Pa.; Blauncr Bros, New 

York. 
Corsets — Chicago Corset Company. 
Gloves — J. H. Cownie Glove Co., Des Moines, Iowa; 

California Glove Co., Napa, Cal. 
Hats — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia Pa ; E 

M. Knox Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Shirts and Collars— United Shirt and Collar Company 

Troy, N. Y.; Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co., Troy, N. Y ; 

Cluett, Peabody & Co., Troy, N. Y. ; James R. 

Kaiser, New York City. 
Shoes — Harney Bros., Lynn, Mass.; J. E. Tilt Shoe 

Co., Chicago, 111. 
Suspenders— Russell Mfg. Co.. Middletown, Conn. 
Textiles — Merrimac Manufacturing Company (printed 

goods I, Lowell, Mass. 
Underwear — Oneita Knitting Mills. Utica N Y 
Woolens— Hartford Carpet Co., Thompsonville, Conn ■ 

J. Capps & Son, Jacksonville, 111. 



PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders — Geo. M. Hill Co., Chicago, 111.; Boorurr. 

& Pease Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Newspapers — Philadelphia Democrat, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Hudson, Kimberly & Co., printers, of Kansas 
City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey Co., publishers, Hammond 
Intl.; Gazette, Terre Haute, Ind.; Times, Los An- 
geles, Cal. 

POTTERY, GLASS, STONE, AND CEMENT 

Pottery and Brick — J. B. Owens Pottery Co. of Zanes- 
ville, Ohio; Northwestern Terra Cotta Co., of Chi- 
e:i ,'o. 111.; C. W. Stine Pottery Co., White Cottage, 
Ohio; Harbison-Walker Refractory Co.. Pittsburg 
Pa.; Utica Hydraulic Cement and Utica Cement 
Mfg. Co., Utica, 111. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 

Carriage and Wagon Builders — S. R. Bailey & Co , 
\niesbury, Mass.; Hassett & Hodge. Amesbury, 
Mass.; Carr, Prescott & Co., Amesbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers, Frarv & Clark, yEtna 
< ompany, New Britain, Conn.; Iver Johnson Arms 
Company, Fitchburg, Mass.; Kelsey Furnace Com- 
pany, Syracuse, N. Y.; Brown & Sharpe Tool Com- 
pany, Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery Com- 
pany, Turner's Falls, Mass.; Atlas Tack Company, 
lairhaven, Mass.; Henry Disston & Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa.; American Hardware Co. (Russell & Er- 
win Co. and P. & F. Corbin Co.), New Britain, Conn.; 
Merritt & Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, of 
Carpentersville, 111.; Carborundum Company, Niag- 
ara Falls, N. Y.; Casey & Hedges, Chattanooga, 
renn.; Gurney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont.; 
Sattley Manufacturing Company, Springfield, Ohio; 
Page Needle Company, Franklin, N. H. ; American 
Circular Loom Company, New Orange, N. J.; Payne 
Engine Company, Elmira, N. Y. ; Lincoln Iron Works 
(F. R. Patch Manufacturing Company), Rutland, 
Vt. ; Art Metal Construction Company, Jamestown, 
N. Y. ; Erie City Iron Works, Erie, Pa.; David May- 
dole Hammer Co., Norwich, N. Y.; Singer Sewing 
Machine Company, Elizabeth, N. J.: National Ele- 
vator and Machine Company, Honesdale, Pa.; Pitts- 
burg Expanded Metal Co., Pittsburg. Pa, 

Iron, Architectural — Geo. L. Meskir. Evansville, Ind. 

Stoves — Germer Stove Company. Erie. Pa.; "Radiant 
Home" Stoves, Ranges and Hot Air Blast, Erie, Pa.; 
Wrought Iron Range Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
WOOD AND FURNITURE. 

Bag's — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 
Bemis Bros., St. Louis, Mo. 

Baskets — Williams Manufacturing Company, North- 
ampton, Mass. 

Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster 
Company, of Davenport. Iowa; M. Goeller's Sons, 
Circleville, Ohio; Merkle-Wiley Broom Co., Paris, 
Illinois. 

Carriages — Crane, Breed & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Cooperag-e — Northwestern Cooperage and Lumber 
Company (otherwise known as the Buckeye Stave 
Company), of Ohio, Michigan, and Wisconsin: Elgin 
Butter Tub Company, Elgin. 111.; Williams Cooper- 
age Company and Palmer Manufacturing Company, 
of Poplar Bluff, Mo. 

China — Wick China Company. Kit tanning. Pa, 

Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio; Brumby Chair Company, Marietta, 6a.; 
O. Wisnor Piano Company, Brooklyn. N. Y.; Krell 
Piano Company. Cincinnati, Ohio; N. Drucker & Co., 
Cincinnati, Ohio, trunks; St. Johns Table Company, 
St. Johns, Mich.; Grand Rapids Furniture Manufac- 
turing Association, Grand Rapids, Mich.; Derby 
I e.-k ( !o., I '"Sinn, Mass. 

Gold Leaf — W. H. Kemp Company, New York. N. Y. ; 
Andrew Reeves, Chicago, 111.; George Reeves, Cape 
May, N. J.; Hastings Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Henry Avers, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lumber -Trinity County Lumber Company, Crove- 
ton, Texas; Reinle Bros. & Solomon. Baltimore, 
Mel.; Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company, 
Morehouse, Mo.; Union Lumber Company, Fort 
Bragg, Cal. 

Leather — Kullman, Salz & Co., Benicia. Cal.; A. B. 
Patrick & Co., San Francisco, Cal.; Columbus Buggy 

and Harness Company, Columbus, Ohio; Leiiii 
Bros., Baltimore, Md. 

Rubber — Kokomo Rubber Company, Kokomo. Ind.; B. 
F. Goodrich Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio; Dia- 
mond Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Faiier Boxes — E. N. Rowell & Co., Batavia, N. Y.; J. 
X, Roberts & Co., Metropolis, 111. 

Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Co.. Norfolk, N. Y. ; 
Potter Wall Paper Co., Hoboken, N. J. 

Typewriters — Underwood Typewriter Company, Hart- 
ford, Conn, 

Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, of Phila- 
delphia. Pa.; Crescent Courvoiseer Wileox Com- 
pany; los. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Company 
Sag Harbor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Advertising Novelties — Novelty Advertising Com- 
pany, Coshocton, Ohio. 

Burlap — II. B. Wiggins' Sons' Company, Bloomliehl. 
N. J. 

Bill Pasters — Bryan .<• Co.. Cleveland, Ohio, 

Railways- Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad; 

Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railwaj Company 
Telegraphy — Western Union Telegraph Company, ami 

its Messenger Service 
D. M. Parry. Indianapolis, Tnd. 
Wellman. Osborne & Co., Lynn, Mass.; Thomas Taylor 

& Son, Hudson. Mass. 
C. W. Post, Manufacturer of drape Nuts and Postum 

''.real. Battle Creek, Mich. 
Lchmaier-Swartz & Co., New York City. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



On the Atlantic Coast. 



(Continued from page 3.) 



Union Items. 



Shipping cm tbe Atlantic Const is norma] 
for the season. Freights arc rather low, but 
charters are fairly plentiful. The outlooh in 
the coastwise trade is decidedly more encour- 
aging than it was in t lie corresponding month 
( I last jrear. 



Some weeks ago the managers of the 

''American Seamen's Federation," a crimp- 
ing concern, with headquarters in New York, 
were haled into court by the New York agenl 
of the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union to show 
cause why they should not pay a license as 
shipping-agents. They were each put under 
$500 bail to appear for trial on September 21, 
hut when that date arrived and the clerk of 
the court called out their names, neither of 
them was on hand to answer. Their bail will 
therefore in all likelihood be forfeited. 



Mention was made in these columns a few- 
weeks ago that at the request of Comrade 
Gildermeister, the New York agent of the At- 
lantic Coast Seamen's Union, the New York 
Central Federated Union had sent a communi- 
cation to Commissioner of Licenses Keating, 
urging him to enforce the municipal ordi- 
nance requiring all shipping-agents to be li- 
censed. A reply has since been received from 
Mr. Keating, stating that at the present time 
only one shipping-agent remains unlicensed. 
and that his case is now under advisement 
by the License Bureau. 



II. 1'. Griffin, General Secretary of the Ma- 
rine Cooks' and Stewards' Association of the 
Atlantic Coast, reports good progress. Every 
steamship line in New York, excepting the 
Ward line, has been unionized, and fifty men 
in the stewards' department in the Ward line 
have also joined the Association, and it is a 
reasonable expectation that before long that 
line, too, will be thoroughly organized. The 
Baltimore branch of the Association is also re- 
ported as doing very well. Mr. Griffin has 
been elected a delegate to represent the Asso- 
ciation at the coming convention of the In- 
ternational - Union of America. 



After months id' more or less sueeessful 
bucking againsl the Marine Firemen's Union, 
the United Fruil Company, of Boston, has at 
last yielded to that organization, and its 
steamers are now carrying none but union 
firemen, coalpassers and oilers at prevailing 
union wages. The success of the Marine Fire- 
men in this instance lias been attained very 
largely through the good work of Comrade 
Maloney. the Boston agent of the organiza- 
tion, supplemented by the loyalty of a num- 
ber of the older members. The fight against 
the United Fruit Company would have been 
won long ago. had it not been for the treacl 
ery of many members who. when the Union 
was lockcd-OUt by the company, violated their 
pledge to the Union and went over to the 
enemy. These men are now reaping the re- 
ward of their treachery by being locked-oul by 
both parties to the controversy. It is the old, 
old story of labor and capital warfare enacted 
once more. When pence has been established, 
and the indemnity question settled satisfac- 
torily, the scab is thrown on the scrap-heap of 
an unsympathetic world, like the worthless 
trash he is. 



Fag Ends. 



Whom the trusts love they chasten with fat 

jobs. 

Enthusiasm and sincerity are a hard team 

to beat 



There are none so diffident as those who 
know the most. 

Enlightened men will freely follow where 
fools can not be led. 



No victory is so well worth lighting for as 
the victory over self. 



Friendship which musl he bought is never 
worth the price it costs. 



Time is the nursery of our hopes and the 
graveyard of our ambitions. 



Wisdom is the natural ally of virtue: igno- 
rance is the natural ally of vice. 



It's a foolish fly that accepts an invitation 
to walk into the spider's parlor. 



The difficulty of attaining perfection is besl 
realized by those who have come nearest to it. 



Wealth in books and poverty in fact are the 
two most distinctive features of our civiliza- 
tion. 



Trust editors are Janus diplomats forsooth, 
bold flatterers of falsehood and meek friends 
of truth. 



Much of what passes for "originality" 
nowadays is often merely the indigestion of a 
turgid imagination. 



Any scratcher on the surface of life can 
find its evils, but it lakes a philosophic mind 
to bear up under them. 



There is one thing which can truthfully be 
said in favor of the average daily newspaper: 
What it lacks in quality >< makes up in quan- 
tity. 

Between the taciturnity of the wise and the 
Loquacity of the foolish, the avi in has 

a pretty hard time finding out what's what in 
this world. 



Man's knowledge, as compared to his ig- 
norance, is as a tiny rivulet compared to the 

mighty sea. lie usually does not even know 
that much. 



The man who has learned to bear with a 
small present evil, that a greater good may be 
obtained by and by, has found the real path of 
progress. 



The difference between a "speech" and a. 
"plain talk" is generally merely the differ- 
ei between rhetorical flourish's and com- 
mon sense statements. 



The difference between a useful and a harm- 
ful education is merely the difference between 
the knowledge that makes men intelligently 
discontented with preventable evils and re- 
signed to incurable evils, and the knowledge 
that makes men unreasonably discontented 
with all things. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with the 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 

WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer. 
1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, MASS., 1%A Lewis St 

Br&nchcs * 
BANGOR. ME.. 211 Broad St. ' 
PORTLAND, ME., 3T7A Fore St. 
NEW BEDFORH. MASS., 7 South Water St. 
PROVIDENCE. R. I.. W South Alain St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y„ 51-52 South St. 
NEW YORK. N. Y.. 68 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, MR, 604 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, V.\ . B28 Water St. 
MOBILE ALA.. 104 Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, I. A., 937 Tchoupitoulaa St 
BRUNSWICK, GA. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN S UNION. 
Headquarters : 
BROOKLYN, N .Y., 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, MASS.. 2S4 Commercial St. 
JERSEY CITY, x. J., 35 Eludson St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA.. 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMi iRE. Ml', ir:,f, Thames st. 
Norfolk. VA., 89 Church St. 
NKWPORT NEWS. VA., 2 MM Washington St. 
MOBILE, ALA., 10 1 South Commerce St. 
new ORLEANS, I. A.. 937 Tchoupitoulaa st 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., K,G Christopher St. 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters: 
boston, MASS., Commercial Wharf. 
Branch : 

GLOUCESTER, MASS.. 111'i Main St 

INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 
CHICAGO, n.L, 121-123 North Desplalnea st. 
Branches: 

MILWAUKEE, WIS., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O, 87 Ridge St 
CLEVELAND, O., 171 East River St. 
TOLEDO. O. 719 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA. N. Y., 152 Main St 
DETROIT, MTCH., 7 Woodbridge St., East 
SUPERIOR, WIS., 1721 North Third St 
ASHLAND, WIS.. 515 East Second St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAT CITY, MICH. 919 North Water St. 
MANITOWOC. WIS., SO0 South Eighth St 
ERIE. PA., 107 East Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL.. 9142 Mackinaw St 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, o. 992 Day St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 1107 Adams st 
PORT HURON, MICH., 98] Military St 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS OF THE 
GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters : 
BUFFALO, x. v.. 55 Main st. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches : 
DETROIT, MICH., mm Jefferson st 
I I »LEDO, O, 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. V. If.* Mai 
OGDENSBURG, X. v.. ;. i Hamilton St 
BAY CITY, MICH., 919 Water st 
ASHTABU1 A HARBOR, O., Tel. 
CLEVELAND. O., Atwater Bid*., Room 1. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 12 Wells st. 
MILWAUKEE, wis.. :;i: Florida st 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT. O., !i«l Pav st 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAX FRANCISCO, CAT... Bouthwest corner East 
and Mission Sts. 

Branches: 
TACOMA, wash.. S0O4 MoCarver st. 
SEATTLE. WASH.. 1812 Western Ave, 
PORT TOWXSRND. WASH., 114 Quincy St. . 
ABERDEEN, wash.. P. O. Box 834 
PORTLAND. OR.. 23 North Front St. 
EUREKA, CAL., P. O. Box 327. 
s.\N PEDRO cat... P. O. Pov 2MS0. 
HONOLULU. H. T., P. ' ' Box 96. 



PACIFIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 16 Slciiart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, WASH., Colman Dock. Room 10. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. :. I Mission St. 
BrT.ncliGS * 

SEATTLE, WASH., Colman Dock, Boom :>. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 1'. o. Box L' 1 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC COAST 
AND ALASKA. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCisco. CAL., 9 Mission St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. WASH. P. O. Box 12. 
ASTORIA. OR., P. O. BOX is:.. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 51 Mission St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO. CAL.. 200 M St. 



THE COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALIA 

29 Erskine Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 



■»« 



*fc 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



List of Union Offices 

ALLIED PRINTING TRADES 

COUNCIL 

of San Francisco, Cal. 



429 



and 



Abbott, F. H., 314-316 Battery. 

Altvater Printing Co., 2593-2595 Mission 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

American Printing House, 1067 Market. 

Art Printery, The, 41-43 Eighth. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery. 

Barry, Jas. H., The Star Press, 
Montgomery. 

Belcher & Phillips, 508 Clay. 

Ben Franklin Press, 123 Seventh. 

Bensen & Liss, 776 Bryant. 

Berry Bros., 320 Sansome. 

Bickell, L. A., 19 First. 

Black Cat Press, 4 02 McAllister. 

Boulin-Leichner Co., 519 Filbert. 

Brown. Andrew Printing Co., First 
Mission. 

Brunt, W. N. Co., 102-101 Second. 

Budde. H. F., Cal. Press, 407% Turk. 

Church Press, 23 Davis. 

Collins. C. J., 16 Hayes. 

Cook, The Morton L., 144 Second. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Cubery & Co., 587 Mission. 

Danish Printing Co., 410 Kearny. 

Daily Racing News, 21-23 First. 

Day & McClinton, 538 Sacramento. 

Drake & Baker, 850 Market. 

Drum Bros., 638 Mission. 

Eagle Printing Co., The, 344 Kearny. 

Eastman, Frank & Co., 509 Clay. 

Eastman & Mitchell, 415 Market. 

Fording & Halle, 22 Clay. 

Francis-Valentine Co., 5 Anna Lane, off 
Eddy. 

Gabriel Printing Co., 320 Sansome. 

Gallowav Publishing Co., 146 Second. 

Gilmartin Publishing Co., The. 19 First. 

Guedet Printing Co., 935 Market. 

Golden State Printing Co., 73 Third. 

Golden West Press, 146 Second. 

Granger & Caldwell, 526 Montgomery. 

Hancock Bros., 809 Mission. 

Harvey, John D, 509 Clay. 

Hayden Printing Co., 417 Montgomery. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

Hiester, Wm. A., 529 California. 

Hughes, E. C. & Co., 511 Sansome. 

Illinois Pacific Glass Works, 10-16 Main 

Jalumstein Printing Co., 310 Hayes. 

Knarston Printing Co., 529 Washington. 

Lafontain, J. R., 603 Merchant. 

Latham & Emanuel, 511 Sacramento. 

Leader, The, 532 Commercial. 

Leilich & Colburn, City Hall Square. 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

Levingston, L., 540 Clay. 

Luce & Her Co., 406 Sansome. 

Lynch, James T., 514 Kearny. 

Lyon, W. T. & Co., 161 First. 

Majestic Press, The, 1566 Market. 

McCracken Printing Co., 509 Kearny. 

Medina & Co., 221 Sacramento. 

Meyerfield, Albert M., 414 Pine. 

Mohahan, John & Co., 412 Commercial. 

Moore-Hinds Co., 149 Natoma. 

Morris & Bain, 320 Sansome. 

Murdock, C. A. & Co., 532 Clay. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Nevin, C. W. & Co., 532 Commercial. 

Occidental Mystic Press, 6 Cottage Row 

Pacific Goldsmith Publishing Co., 146 
Second. 

Partridge, John, 306 California. 

Pernau Bros., 543 Clay. 

Phelan, F. M., Ill Cook. 

Phillips & Van Orden, 508 Clay. 

Police Bulletin of San Francisco, Hall 
of Justice. 

Polyglott Press, 62S Montgomery. 

Recorder Publishing Co., 516 Commer- 
cial. 

Roesch, Louis Co.. 321-25 Sansome. 

Roonev, J. V. Co., 1308 Mission. 

Samuel, Wm., 411% California. 

San Francisco Newspaper Union, 405- 
407 Sansome. 

Schreiber, P. H, 809 Mission. 

Shanly, J. M., 414 Clay. 

Smyth, Owen H, 511 Sacramento. 

Spaulding, Geo. & Co., 414 Clay. 

Springer & Co., 240 Ellis. 

Standard Printing Co., 518 Clay. 

Stanley-Taylor Co., 650 Mission. 

Sterett Co., W. I., 933 Market. 

Sterling Press, 229 Stevenson. 

Stuetzel & Co., 144 Second. 

Sunset Press, 1327 Market. 

Sutter Press, The, 240 Stockton. 

Tomoye Press, 144 Union Square av. 

Town Talk Printing Co., 146 Second. 

Turner, H. S., 3232 Mission. 

Valleau & Peterson, 410 Sansome. 

Wale Printing Co., 621 Clay. 

Wenderoth & Brown, 319 California. 

Werner, Geo. A., 1067 Howard. 

Western Fine Arts Co., 529 Clay. 

Williams, Joseph, 142 Seventh. 

Wilson, Geo. F., 405 Front. 

Winkler, Chas. W., 146 Second. 

Winterburn, Jos., 417 Clay. 

Woodward, W. A. & Co., 12 Sutter. 
Bookbinders. 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

Brown & Power Co., 508 Clay. 

Buswell & Co., 536 Clay. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

McGreeney, Wm. H, 23 Stevenson. 

Kitchen, Jr. Co., John, 510-514 Com- 
mercial. 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

Mclntyre, J. B., 424 Sansome. 

Malloye, F., 422 Sacramento. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Phillips Bros., 505 Clay. 

Rotermundt, Hugo L., 413 Sacramento. 

Webster, Fred L, 19 First. 

Whelan, Richard I. & Co., 42 Steuart. 

San Francisco Mailing Co., 609 Mission, 
5th floor. 

Photo Engravers and Etchers. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery, near Mission. 

Bolton & Strong, 621 Clay. 

California Engraving Co., 506 Market. 

San Francisco Etching Co., 109 New 
Montgomery. 

McCabe & Sons, 611 Merchant. 

Sierra Engraving Co., 324 Grant av. 

Sunset Engraving Co., 108 Union Square 
av. 

Union Engraving Co., 114 Union Square 
av. 

Tosemite Engraving Co., 24 Montgom- 
ery. 

Electrotypers and Stereotypers. 

American Press Association, 19 First. 

Hoffschnoidcr Bros.. 412 Commercial. 

Martin & Co., 508 Clay. 




DeinandThe 



SCANDINAVIAN AMERICAN SAVINGS BANK 

Cor. Bush and Montgomery Sts. (Mills Building) 
SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 
Capital, $300,000. Total Assets, $1,000,000 

Directors Advisory Board 

Charles Nelson Martin Sanders E. W. Ferguson J. Jensen 

' ewis I. Cowgill W. H. Little Fr. C. Siebe A. T. Dunbar 

1. C. Eschen Henry Wilson Mikal Olsen J. C. Everding 

Geo. H. Tyson S. D. Denson, Attorney 

Saving Accounts Solicited. Commercial deposits subject to check. Inter- 
est paid on savings and commercial balances, and allowed from date of de- 
nosit. Drafts, Telegraphic Exchange and Letters of Credit issued, payable 
in New York, London, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and all the prin- 
cipal cities of Europe and America. Open Saturday evenings from 6:30 to 8, 
for deposits. 




Notice! Notice! 
REMOVED 

THE UNITED STATES 
WATCH CLUB 

9 SPEAR ST., Buckley Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Merchant Tailor 

REMOVED TO 

9 Spear Street, Buckley Bldg. 

PHONE MONTGOMERY 1242 

SAN FRANCISCO 



General News. 




The Scandinavian 
Sailors' Home 

Cor. Drumm and Commercial Sts. 

Telephone James 4846. 

A new building erected especially for sail- 
ors. Latest improvements, clean and light 
rooms, bath, reading and dining rooms. 
First-class board and lodging at reasonable 
rates. Gospel service — Sundays, 3:45 p. m., 
and Wednesdays, 8 o'clock p. m. All wel- 



iome. 



A. ANDERSON 

Missionary and Manager. 



The Czar has conferred the title of 
Count upon M. de Witte, the Russian 
peace plenipotentiary. 

Fire, causing a loss estimated at about 
$500,000, consumed the entire business 
portion of Butte, Mont., on September 
24. 

The California Supreme Court has de- 
clared unconstitutional the Anti-Trading 
Stamp law passed by the last Legislature. 

The Minneapolis Times has suspended 
publication, after sixteen years ' effort to 
reach a paying basis. 

The net increase in the British reve- 
nue for the quarter ending September 
30 is £731,750, despite the decrease in 
the duty on leather. 

The Swedish steamers Njord and Rob- 
ert collided on September 30 near Hveen 
Island, in the Sound. The Robert sank. 
Twenty persons were drowned. 

Wreckage washed ashore on Kangaroo 
Island, on the coast of South Australia, 
points to the loss with all hands of the 
British ship Loch Vennachar, 1557 tons, 
which left the Clyde on June 14, bound 
to Adelaide and Melbourne. 

The Sultan of Turkey has granted to 
Germany the right to establish a naval 
station on the island of Thasos, ninety 
miles northwest of the Dardanelles, and 
has given a German company a conces- 
sion of all the mines on the island. 

During the recent sessions of the Con- 
gress of Zemstvo and Municipalities at 
Moscow, Russia, a new political party, 
entitled the Constitutionalist-Nationalist 
party, was formed. Many prominent 
persons are members of the new organi- 
zation. 

Officials in Paris, France, say that 
it is practically assured that France will 
accept an invitation to the second peace 
conference at The Hague, owing to the 
united efforts of Emperor William and 
President Roosevelt, but official action 
awaits Russia 's communication. 

The Council of Professors, at St. 
Petersburg, Russia, has voted in favor 
of the unrestricted admission of Jews 
to the university courses and has rec- 
ommended the admission of all candi- 
dates for matriculation regardless of the 
regulation restricting Hebrew students 
to 3 per cent of the student body. 

Admiral Fournier says the British 
naval station at Singapore gives a strat- 
egic base sufficient to absolutely prevent 
the passage of naval forces within the 
China Sea, and is capable of suppress- 
ing commercial communication between 
China and Europe. Thus Singapore be- 
comes Great Britain 's key to the door of 
the China Sea. 

It is said that discharged Japanese 
soldiers may solve the Yaqui problem in 
the State of Sonora. Such, it is report- 
ed, is the hope of the Mexican Govern- 
ment, which has just entered into a con- 
tract with the Imperial Japanese colo- 
nization company for the colonization of 
Japanese in that State. 

The special committee of the Norwe- 
gian Storthing to which the question wa.s 
referred, decided by a vote of 12 to 6 to 
recommend to Parliament the adoption 
of the Government bill embodying the 
draft of the treaty providing for the sep- 
aration of Norway and Sweden signed 
at Karlstad on September 23. The dis- 
senting six are Deputies Konow, Kast- 
berg, Eriksen, Hansen, Bryggcssa and 
Grivi, 

The Workers' Compensation for Acci 
dents Amendment Bill, recently intro- 
duced in the New Zealand Parliament, 
proposes that a weekly payment in re- 
spect of compensation for the total or 
partial disablement shall not be less 
than £1 per week in every case where 
I he worker earned not less than 30s per 
week. The compensation may, in lieu of 
weekly payments, be a lump sura agreed 
to by the parties or determined by the 
Arbitration Courl. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Worhers 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Under the Victorian (Australia) 
Wages Board mployes must not 

be paid any part of a wage in mer- 
chandise. 

Wharf lumpers al Port Augusta, 
i Australia, recently went on strike 
9< t lie employment of 
non-unionii 

The New South Wales typographical 
union celebrated its twenty-fifth birth- 
day last month by a large picnic party 
at one of tlie beautiful pleasure gro 
on i it' Botany Bay, Sydney. 

In Victoria last year the factories 
numbered 4208, being an increase of 57 
on the previous year, and 50,554 males 
and 25,733 females were employed there- 
in — increases of 1120 and 1939, r. 
tively. 

neral Booth of the Salvation Army 
announces that he has chartered three 
which in the spring will sail 
from London fur Canada with emigrants, 
all of whom will be guaranteed employ- 
ment 

\perienee of those trades in Vic- 
toria which come under the prod 
wing of the factories and Shops legisla- 

has been so satisfactory that o 
not so fortunate are clamoring for ami 
al advantag 
The Coastal Operative Butchers and 
Slaughtermen's Union, in West Austra- 
lia, intends to make an effort to resusci- 
tate the one-time powerful Goldfields 
Butchers' Union, which was killed by an 
adverse award of the Arbitration Court. 
The Sydney (N. S. W.) Wharf La- 
borers' Accident and Burial Society has 
tVll' to the credit of its buri::l fund, 
£384 in the accident fund, and £102 in 
the management fund; or a total of 
10. The sum of £43 10s Sd was dis- 
tributed in accident pay during the past 
half-year. 

Under the Zealand Shops and 

Offices Act, Ah Joe, Mow Lee, Ah Poy, 

Wah Kee Bros., Kong, Some & Co., Ah 

Wing, were recently each and all 

costs, totaling £9 lis, for 

og to close at G p. m.; and You Lee 

lined £2 and 7s costs, for failing to 

close on the Btatutory half holiday. 

The Victorian (Australia) Anti- 
iing League has discovered that a 
number of girls who are good short I 
writers and smart typists were receiving 
un average wage of only 8s 6d a week. 
The League is approaching other or- 
ganizations with a view of action being 
taken to assist the girls to obtain a rea- 
ble wage. 

The Australian High Court has grant- 
ed the New South Wales Colliery Em- 
ployes' Federi re to appeal 
against the decision of the State Su- 
preme Court ii the mineowners 
an injunction restraining the State 
Arbitration Court from hearing the in- 
dustrial dispute submitted by the em- 
s ' union. 

Mail advices reaching England give a 
startling picture of the conditions under 
which imported Chinese laborers are 
forced to work in the gold mines of the 
Transvaal. There are now 48,000 coolies 
employed in the mine3. They are housed 
omponnds, where they are in reality 
prisoners. Every infraction of rej 

or failure to turn out the allotted 
amount of w .irk is visited with - 

ami degrading punishment. 

A bill which has need into 

the Victorian i Australia) Legislative 
Assembly to regulate the attachment of 
es provides that no order shall be 
le by any court, judge or justice for 
the :i of the i any 

clerk, servant, laborer or workman, 

whose pay does not es d £2 per week. 

If the wages of any such person does 

exc I £2 a week, only the surplus 

above that rate is to be liable to attach- 
ment. 



dvertised for six months 
kept at the Sailors' Union < iffl. 
twelve mouths, all told. II 

I t lie expirat ion of o 
will be returned to the Pi 



at, 1. r-. 
T. A. 
Abernethy, W. E. 
Adolf, C. 
Aglitzky, Hans 
Albrecht, Einll 
Allmers, I". 
Amundsen, Pet. 
Amundsen-1014 
Andersen. Ole 
Andersen-7 1 l 
Andersen-1009 
Andersen, E. G. 

rsen-1301 

Andersen, Lars T 
Andersen, A. H. 
Anders 

sen, W. A. 
Andersen, 

\ . K. 
Anderson- SO l 
Anderson. Adolf 
Anderson, Thomas 

tvelt, M. 
Barleben, E. 
Bauer, Frank 
Bechler, .1 
Benson, B 

A.-1878 
Bergquist, V. 

Alf 

Iseil, W. 
i son-t -72 
Blackley, Albert 

i . o 
I'.loclc. Herman 
Bock, C. 

nan. Win. 

Boothby, J. 

Cain an, ' ■ ■ 
Canrinez, W. 
Carlsen, linns 

Carlsson, John 
Carlssoi 

j . Si surd 
Chevis. Frank 
i lhristensen-986 
Christensen, A. 
Dahl, Olaf 
Dahlgren, Oscar 
Danlelson, Ernst 
Degn, Paul 

Groot, .J. 
n>e Haan, G. A. 
De Jong. W. 
Eck, Nicolas 

Eckhardt, W. 
Ehelert, Aug, 
i Ikblora 
Eklund, Ellis 

Eliasen. Johan 
Kliassen, J. A. 
Eliassen. Ed. 
Elingsen, P. 

lelsen E. 
En gel i, E. 
Engstrom, Chas. 

Icius, it 
Pagelund, i 
Fagerlund, 

Earagher, John 
Earsstram, C. 
Gabrielsen, Knud 
Garside, Ja 
Gasman, G. A. 
Geissler, T. 
Glbbs, G. W. 
Gilholm, A. 

<;i 
GJasdal, Filing 

alk. Max 

Griffin, John 

Gronberg, Erik 
Grondabl. W. S. 

■ mi. Fred 
Hakansson, 
Halvorsen, J. 
Hn.lvorsen 
Halvorsen. Wm. 
Hallberg, Herman 
Halmes, C. 
Ilaininarsten. O. 
1 1 an tee. M N. 

n-1267 
Hansen. Alf. 
Hansen. Chas. G. 
Hansen, Hans R. 

Hansen 

en, Theo. 

en, ii C. 
Hansen, Fred S. 
Hansen-1 1 50 
Hanseti 
Hansen 

Hansen-Edwart 
Hansen- 1 16 I 
Hansen, Ole R 
Hansen. Laurits A. 
Ingebretsen, J. A. 
Ingebretsen, C. J. 
Jansen, Henry 
Jensen, O. 
Jensen, P. 
Jensei. 

Jepsen. Antoni 
Jepsen, A. 
Jobson, Chas. 
Johanesen, M. 
Johanesen-1428 
Johanesen- 1 
Johansen-725 
Johansen-l'JTa 
Johansen, Joakim 
Johansen, Eudv. 
Johanse O C, 

i var 
Johanse, i-l us 
Kahlbetzer. P. 

Karelsen-L'Tii 
Karlstrom, J. R. 
Kask, John 

on, Wm. 
King, John 
Klemettila-567 
Klosson, Chas. 
Kolderup-423 
K'ook, Harry 
Koop, John 
Kopmann. J. 
Korthe. \V. 
Kosa, p. 
Kotcharin, J. 
Lajord, E. Peder- 
sen 



Anderson. Ed. A. 

Anderson. A < 
Anderson, Fred 
Anderson, A. B. 

rson .Andrew 
Anderson- 1 97 
Anderson -991 

rson, I.. 
Anders. ni-lie,.:: 

Andersson, a. h.-t i t 
Andersson, <>si<ar 

Andersson-l 060 
Andersson I 

son, I S 
An.i. rsson - 1 1 1 9 
. Ander 
Andrea ■ - en, 0, 
Arnson, Henry 
Arntsen, Erick 
Arvesen, Arnt 
Arvldsson, A. M. 
Aselius, Algol 

Asplund, Emi] 
i lorjesson, 
i torman- 1018 
Boston, Andrew 
Brandburg-1306 
Brandenberg. A. 
Brevig. Herman 

■1. A. 
Bridgman B. 
Brillowski, M. 

ck-727 
Brock, He 'man 
Brown, Clar 
Bruggencoie. c 
Bruhver, Kasper 
Buck, Harry 
Burke, i 
Buset, 1. 

Christensi < 
Christiansen-901 

Christiansen. P. 
Christensi n, U 
Clausen-793 
Coadon. I. 
Conaughton. E. 
Craig. 

Crlstiansen, S 
Curtis, R. H. 

Doyle, w. P. 
Oierks, Johannes 
Duncan. Herbert 
Durand. Stanis- 

Durand, Y. 
Durholt, Hugo 
Enlund. O. \\ 
Ennevalsen, I. 

Eriekson. E. 
Erickson. Axel 

Eriksen, Chas. 
Eriksen 
Erikson. P. 
Erikson, S. S. 

n, A . 
Evensi 

James 

Forslund, Victor 
Forssell. Frans 

en, i iscar 
Fredriksson. A. 
. gr pet er 
Gronman, K. 
Grundberg, Ivar 
Grunbrock, H. J. 
Gulliksen, Gus 
Gundersen, J. 
Gunderson, I.. S. 
Gunsten. G. 
Gustafson. K. O. 
Gustafson, F. 
tfson-600 
Gustafson, J. 

n. Hans 
Hansen, Aug. 

i. Ed. 
Hanson, J. A. 

Maurice 
Hanson-8 1 .'. 
Hanson. Adolph 

Idsen, K. 
Harglijem. I. M. 

Hedlund, C. W. 
Hedman, John M. 
Heggum, Louis 
Helander. Chas. 
Heloste, C. E. 

tn, O. 
Hermansso... H. 
Hines, B. G. 
Hinriehsen, Harry 
Hjeresen, V. J. B. 
Holm. J. 
Holmlund, A. 
Hornberg, < ;. J 1 . 
Holt, K. C. 
Isakson, Q 

Johanson, Herman 
Johansson-880 
Johannesen, Osker 
Johannson, J. W. 

s. 
Johnsen, Sigv. B. 
Johnson-] 399 
Johnson, otto 
Johnson, B. P. 
Johnson, J. 
Johnson, Ernest F. 
Johnson, Harry 
Johnson, Aug. ' 
Jonasson, Frans 
Jonsson, Ernest P, 
Jorgensen ,P. 

Knaph, John O. 
Knieling, John 
Knlnltzer, Alf. 

K'nudsen, II 
Knudson, Chris 
Krieger, Adolf 
Kristiansen, Gus 
Kristiansen. T. O. 
Kristoffersen. J. 
Kristensen, L. 
Krlstensen, M. 
Kriza. R. 
Kroger, I,. H. 
Krogstad, E. 
Kron\ all. ii 
Kurki. H. M. 
bane, Eeolond 
Larsen, Christian 



I. a rson -1 1 1 :! 
I.arsen-613 
Larson, Fred 
Larssen, M. 
Ea rsson, Idorth 
Laurenson. Hugh 
Lauritzen, O. 
Lausmann, J 
I.eithoff. Carl 

iff, C. 
Leineweber, J. 
Lepsoe, H. 
Lercne, Andrew C. 
Eikait. Ch. 
i,in. I, Chris 
Lindquist, Karl 
Lindqulst, c. A. 
Macbeth-1124 
Madsen-1035 
Mad 

Mann, E. 

trom, W. 
Martin, H. 
.Martin. Albert 
Martin. Herbert 
Ma I thews, J. 
Man, L. 
Maule, G. 
Mavor-1371 
Mei 'arriek. .las. 
McCormick, J. 
Naack, H. 

Nelson. H. 

Xelsoi 

Nielse 
Nielsen-751 
n-71 7 

n, iv lor 
Niels. 

Nie1sen-22R 
Nielsen, Alf. 

O'Daly, John 
050 

i. i.. 

.. I.. K. 
. n se i 

r h. 

ill, J. 

on, i '. A. 

Pea rso ' 

en, K M. 

Pedersen, P. 

i sen, Peder E. 

Pedersen, Sigurd 
Perssot 

i 'etei ss a. i 'a i 

en, Gus E. 

son. M. 

Tormod 

y. Harry 
usen-525 
Ratin, Anton 

a. Chas. 

Richmond, E. 
Roberts, Frank 
Robinson. John E. 
. W. I .. 
Sander-1068 
Sandston. ' ..ii 
Sanvick, Jol 
Schilling-124 i 
Schilling. Car) 
Schroder. August 
Scliroeder, Fred 
Schubert-887 
Schuhmacher, W. 
Senden, Vic 

il, P. 
Siem, Cornelius 
Simonsen, Fred 
Simpson. I C. 

Slvertsen, Geo. 

Sjogreen. A. 
SfcogSfjord, O. 
Skrrio. Mr 
Smedbu rg, 1 n\ Id 
Taberman, Erik 
Talbot, A. E. 

Taiiant, Christy 

i. Franz 
Thestrup. E. P. 
Thomas. Jus. W. 
Thoresen, Pet. 

id, M. J. 
Tlemann, John 
Tlesing, Ed. A. 
Tierney, J. 
[Tberwlmet 
Vanderslip. D. 
Vangsoe, .1. P, J. 
Vassallo, P. 

Watson. J. F. 

Watt, R. A. 
Weber, Emil 

Iborg i: 
Wen.it, Herman 
Westerberg, NT. G. 
Westergren, A. 
Westerholm, W. 
Weslk, Gust. 
Westln, John 
Wiberg, John 

Voell. i He O. 

Zachrisen, J. M. 
Zervas. John 



Linds. 

Lindskog, C. T. O. 

Linds tr Alex. 

Lindslrom. 

w. 

•scar 
n, C. 

1 ,ow lie. R. A. 

.erg, G. H. 

a. All. in 
Eudwick. Bert 
Lukin, Th. 
Lundgren, 

i ;. 

Lum. M. 

th, J. P. 

Menthen. Otto 

son, II M 
Mikkelsen, II. M. 
Moei 
Moffatt, J. 

rog, P. 
Morrisse, I. 
Morris. Wm. T. 
Morrison. II. 
Mortimer, E. 

Nil sei 

Nilsson, A 

Xo.aok. Hans 

Norhin. Axel 

Nordberg, Oscar 

Nor.llun.l, F. 

Nylin 

Nylund, Chas. 

N ,anan, .1 

11. 
i ilsen. 

' J. 
Olssi i 
i ilSRon-562 
Olsson, Gus 
\ 

Petersoi 
Petei 

. ,i 
Petrow. F. 
Pettersen, Johan 

Petterson-851 

Imann, I.. 

i E. 
i, C. 



Rockwell. 
Rosa i 

Rosenblum, J. 
Rosenquist, Alf. 
Rosenstrom. F. 
Ross, Joseph A. 
Roth. G. 
Rudlafl 

t, F. 
Smith, C. H. 
Smith, E. A. 
Smith. F. 
A 
'I'h. 
Sorensen, .lorgen 
Sorensen. C. 
Stahn. Otto 

O, ii 
Starkev. W. 

I'. 
Steph 

1816 

n. Henrik 
r, John 
Strandquist. L. 

.n, OttO 
Swartholm. C. 

Tiernev. John 

John 
Tollefsen, John 

jsen- lie 
Torkel-503 
'I ornstrom, hu. 
Tralow, Rich. 
Trepin, C. 

m, Marinus 

Tyrholm. Johan 
Unruh, Paul 
Voigt. Arthur 
klolen, 1 1. 

m, w. 

Hid. c. p. 
Wind. John 

. John G. 
Will. < 

Willm.an. Wm. 
Wilson. C. 

John 
Wolte, Paul 

Air 
berg, John 



i 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



r.l. chr. 
Al.rahanison, Us, 
Ammel. A. 

Anderson, Chas. 

Anders. in. A -650 
Anderson. I 
Anderson. K. 
Anderson, 
Anderson. Simon 
Austin, Martin 
Ayllffe, A. J. 



I sen. lad yard 

M. 
. Prank 
Bergquist, C. 
Berkelund, Rasmus 
Bertelsen, Alf. 

nl, Christ. 
H.iorkgren. Otto 
. T. 
C. 
iberg, G. 
Brandt, W. 
Brown, Frank 



Burke, Tics. 
Brunstrom, U. A. 

Calo, Augustin San 

t.lS. 

' J. 

la. Emll 

i 'link, 1 1 

E. 1'. 
a. Walter 
Carlson, Eric 
on, .1. 

Carlson. A. ' '. 

1 'asey. J. 

I'nsson. H. 
Chevilore, Boiiion 
Christensen, P. 

Clirlstenson. C 
Christiansen. Fred- 
erick. 

i ney. Ed. 

3, C. 

Danlelson, Gustaf 

son. Axel 
I Heising. Ernst 

;.. Adolf 
Doran, Eugene 
I mis. J. 
1 Eckland, I ■ 

I Engberg, Oscar 
i Eriksen. Fred 

Eriksen, Eneval 

Eriksen, M 

. Hans 
Freusel, Adolf 

1 1. 

Cinstrnm F 
Gjerlow, Ingaard 
ihn 
g, W. 
I Ironberg, i"arl 
Guldberg, Randolf 
K. E. 
• . F. 
1 lalver 

i C. 
I, O l: 

I I a 1 1 - ■ 
Hardy. W. 

insen, A. 

srg. Wm. 
.1. 
Hoi lappa, Oscar 
Horslev, Robin 
Iverssen Ole J. 
la. olis. i [eo. 

'.. L. 
Jacobsen, Oscar 
i 1'. 
a, J. I'.l. 
Jensen, C. H.-569 

Johansen, Chris 

Johansen. W, 
Johanson-1 489 

Johanson-1338 
Johansen, Axel 

K. 
Johansen, Paul 
Johansson. Evert 
Johannesen. Jo- 
hannes 
Johndahl, Harry 
Johnsen. J. W. 

en, a. 
lohnsen. John 
Johnson- l. r .l 6 
tohnson, August 
i I sa 
tolmson. II. 

P. J. 
Karlsson, Julius 

Kelly. I'. 
Klemetilla. G. 
Kloper strom, Wm. 

Knudsen. I-'. 
Knndsen. II I.. 
Kristoffersen. Karl 
Kristoft'erson, Olaf 
La f strom. A. 
Lambert, Edward 
Larsen, 1'eter V. 
Larsen, Hans 
L.uirin, .1. O. 

w. 

W. 
i.l John 
Lewis. George H. 
Lie, A. H. 
Lie, A. 
Li ml. Carl 

I iiclla i ■. • 
Marthinsen K. M. 
Mat insen, Nels 
McCarthy, John 
M.l lonald. N. 
McNiell, J. 
M.-y.-r, G. 



Millard, \\ 
Miller, James 
Miller, Harry 
-Moore, William 
Moore, J. C. 
Morgan. Oskar 

1 1 
M urphy, 1 1 

H M.-754 
Nelson. Jaeoti 
Nelson, Nels 
Nickolsen, Axel 
Nickel, E. 
Nicmerph, Aug. 

Nil sen. i ile 
Nllsen, John 

Nilsen, Axel 

Nissen, James 
Nordenhol 
Norholm, K. I!. 
Nylander, J. A. 
. >fi Iger, i li 

. M. 

ghlin, M 

I Use, 

11 

. L. 

. Andrew 
Olsen. Anton 
Olsen. John C. 
< ilsen, Harry 

i ilsen, Olaf H. 
Olson, Clnus 
Olson. Oben 
olsnn, Regnvald 
Olsson. Oscar 
Onu, J. 
Orling. Gus 
Oshlin, A. 
rling, E. 
A. 
and. T. 

Paai 
Pnaverson, I K 

. T. 
I'asso. Andrew 
Patterson, A.-878 
rson, o. 

i lans 
Perry, R. 

Peterson, Richard 
Petterson. Chas. 
Piedvaehe .Emil 
I'ol.us. E. 
Punntiiui'ii. Louis 
Quigly, 'i'. 

Miiinn. Iianiel 
N 

l; H.-597 

i: H. 
Rosness. C. B. 
Rov. P. N. 
Rude. A. M. 

in. E . 

Samuelson, A. M. 
Samuel son. E. 
Schabethal, P. 
M . 
W 

m, w 
Smith. Andrew 
Smith. Paul 

E. 
Soils. Ingvald 

i. J. 
Sorensen. Soren 
Staaf. E. 
Steckman. G. W. 
Steffenson. S. 
'■erg. Y. 
Si. no. J. 
Storheim. E. N. 
Stossi. 

Svendsen. B. H. 
Svendsen, Olaf 
Svenson. A. -1193 
Svensen, J. 
Swansen, P. I. 
Swansen, Chaa. 
Swans. 

■wall. la. 
A 
Thornton. Thomas 
Tirnrn. K. 
Tornstrom, C. A. 
Turnbull. R. R. 
Turner, Fred 
Tuttie, c r>. 

Van Ree. W. 
Vogt, C 
Terna, P. 
Vvpinkel, I-. 

Walsh, J. 

Wegei 

Well, Charles 

irlund, A. 
West. James 
Westeott. W. 
Wick. 

wight, r. 
Wind. J. 
Winhneskl. F. 
Yunker, Paul 



PORTLAND, OB. 



Ardelenu. Joan 
Xn.lersen, N. 
Bregler, Fried rich 

Win. 
Clifiord, Elic 
rich sen, 
Heinr.-786 
ICngebretsen, Mar- 

Fristrom, Ivar 

anil 
cm. Albert 
Holstenborg, Olaf 

Janson, Oscar 

Johnson. Herman 
Jacobsson, John 
Johansen. Chris- 
en. Viv-1288 



Krane, Karl 
Klover, n 
Lie. Henry 
McEauglin 
Magnusson- 1147 
Maimquest C. 
M. ' Iregor, John .\. 
Mo.-. John 
Nelson, C. 
Robinson. John 

Herbert 
Roever. K. 
Sjostrom. S. K. 
Seibert, Henry 
Swensso: 

Soderman, Ells 
Unger, Paul 

Filing 
Vanstone. Jack 
Westln, John 



DEMAND THIS LABEL 



I53UCD BY AUTHORITY OP 




^m 



WHEN PURCHASING OVERALLS, SHIRTS, OILSKINS, OR 
READY-MADE CLOTHING OF ANY DESCRIPTION! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 




LOOK FOR 

Jewelers' Union Label 

On Back of Each 

BUTTON 

International Seamen's Union of America 

BUTTONS 

For Sailors, Firemen, Cooks ana 
Fishermen 

FIFTY CENTS EACH 

ED. ANDERSEN 

7 East St. SAN FBANCISCO 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



HOFFMAN CIGAR STORE 



Union-made Cigars and Tohacco. 
No Asiatics Employed. 



W. C. BERGIN, Proprietor 

Corner Hotel and Nuuanua Streets, 

HONOLULU, H. T. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 

BURNETT BROS. 

JEWELERS AND 
CHRONOMETER 
^ MAKERS .... 

Union Made 
Watches & Jewelry 

19 HERON ST., ABERDEEN, WASH. 




UNION HARDWARE STORE 

WM. GRIGGS 

404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 



Fine Pocket Knives, Tin 
Ware and Granite Ware. 



BARKLEY CYR CO. 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 
n6 SOUTH "G" STREET 

ABERDEEN, - WASH. 



w. 


C. JUDSON 


EXPRESSMAN 


Sailors' 


Patronage Solicited. 


Phone 693 


ABERDEEN, WASH. 



When in Port at Aberdeen and looking' 
for Union Goods call on 

L. FOGEL 

Watch for the Red Front, 24 Heron St. 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 

Everything from a pair of Rubber Boot:, 

to a Tailor-made Suit. 



FOR UNION-MADE 

Tobacco and Cigars 

GO TO 

F. KINGSTAD 

Stand on Enerance to Union Office. 
ABERDEEN, WASH. 

ABERDEEN. WASH. 



Anderson-512 
Anderson, A. -1060 
Anderson, Ed. 
Anderson, Eskil 
Anderson, John 
Andersen, L.-1245 
Anderson, Axel 
Abrahgamson, Ja- 
cob. 
Benjamin, C. A. 
Block. Hermann 
Birkelund, R. 
Bostrom, >N. A. 
Caiman, George 
Carlson, Charles 
Caspersen. Ch. 
Dishler, Peter 
Dittmayer, Ch. 
Dyb«land. P. Th. 
Ellasen, Elias 
Ehlers, Henry 
Gustafson, Julius 
Hansen, Henrik 
Hansen, Th. 
Hansen, Wm. 
Hogman, W. 
Jacobson, John 
Jansson, 0.-1579 
Johanson, Otto 
Jensen, P. 



Jorgensen, Carl 
Kelly, Patrick 
Lowe, John A 
Madsen, H. M. 
Martin, John F. 
Martin, Paul 
Mietinnen, Adolf 
Moe, John 
Nilsen, M. P. 
Ohman, L. P. 
Olsen, Adolf 
Olsen, Emiel M. 
Olsson, O. A. 
Oleson, Martin 
Peterson, John 
Pederson, Hans 
Paar, Ernst 
Pothoff, Harry 
Reynolds, Roy 
Rio, Nicolas 
Salvesen, Sam 
Schwenke, Carl 
Soderstrom, J. A. 
Svenson, John 
Swenson, James 
Thies. Harry 
Weissin, Charles 
Werner, Frederick 
Zambuera, M. 



(Continued on Page 14.) 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE.) 

General Outfitters for Men and Boys 

Clothing-, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m. ; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE. TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE-NEW GOODS 

AH our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. 
Store closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 



1332 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

WALTER EBRL1CBMAN, 717 Pacific Ave. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



HOQUIAM, WASH. 



When in Port at Gray's Harbor Call 
at the 

Horseshoe Store 

HOQUIAM, WASH. 

For your Clothing, Furnishing Goods, 

Hats, Shoes, Rubber Boots 

and Oilskins. 

Honest Goods at Honest Prices. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing & Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in union-made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



Chas. Eisenbeis F. W. Eisenbeis 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

EISENBEIS & SON 

Dealers in 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Crack- 
ers. Ships' Stores a Specialty. 
316 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Prague, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. (Inc ) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Eartlett Wharf. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Port Townsend, Wash. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 
Dry Goods, Clothing', Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
SIS Water St., next to Commercial Bank. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND 

VEGETABLES. 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. . 



OLD TACOMA CICAR STORE 

J. A. DAVID, Prop. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Tobaccos 
and Smokers' Articles 

Union Made Goods a Specialty. 
2319 NORTH 30th ST. 

OLD TACOMA, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

K. A. Johnson, last heard of in the 
schooner William Rendal, in 1902, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 



Raise 

Your 

Wages 

We have built up the 
largest educational insti- 
tution in the world, with 
an invested capital of 5 
million dollars, and with 
J million students by help- 
ing people to increase their 
earnings. As an instance 
of what we can do for am- 
bitious men engaged in 
seafaring occupations, we 
quote the following: 

When I enrolled in the 
I. C. S., I was a sailor on 
board a steam yacht. 
Through the excellent in- 
struction of my Course. I 
was enabled to gain a 
position as second mate 
at more than double my 
former wanes. 

Henry Erickson. 

070 7th St., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

It is because we have 
helped so many thousands 
of others in all conditions 
and circumstances that we 
;an state positively that 
we can help YOU to earn 
more money. Do you want 
to raise your wages? It 
puts you under no obliga- 
tions to find out how you 
can do so. Simply mark 
and mail the coupon. DO 
IT NOW. 



International Correspondence Schools 
Box 898, Scranlon, Pa. 

.f Sue 



send ii"- th<- free 
»," .hi. i explain ho« 
bcfurc wlii. Ii 1 li. 



Ol let, "1001 Stories 

can i lyforpo, 

■ marl x below, 



Mailer 


Civil Service Exams. 


First Olflcor 


Bookkeeper 


Second Olllcer 


Stonog>u|iher 


Petty Olllcer 


tlcctiloal Engineer 


Chlel Engineer 


Mechanical Engineer 


First Assistant Engineer 


Civil Engineer 


Second Assistant Eng. 


Architect 


Like Captain 


Maehlnllt 


Second Clots Pilot 


Illustrator 


Murine Engineer 


French 1 With 


Meohenloel Draftsman 


German > Edison 


English Branches 


Spanish ) Phonograph 



Name 

St. & No. 
City 



State^ 



News from Abroad. 



Preliminary steps have been taken foi 
sending home the Cubans still remaining 
in Spanish prisons. 

Alderman Walter Vaugnan Morgan 
was elected Lord Mayor of London for 
the ensuing year, on September 29. 

The British Government has decided 
to establish a naval base at Singapore as 
part of a vast new scheme of Imperial 
defense. 

The Pope has appointed Bishop 
'Connell, of Maine, his special envoy 
to the Mikado to build up the Catholic 
( Ihurch in Japan. 

Germany's attitude toward Prance has 
grown pacific as the outcome of the es- 
tablishment of peace between Russia 
and Japan. 

The new Franco-Russian commercial 
convention was signed at St. Petersburg 
on September 29, and becomes effective 
on March 1, 1906. 

Godefroy Cavaignac, who was French 
Minister of War during the exciting pe- 
riod of the Dreyfus case, died suddenly 
on September 25, aged 52 years. 

Official confirmation has been received 
from Parral, Mexico, of a demonstration 
there on September 24 against all for- 
eigners, and against the Americans in 
particular. 

Anti-peace demonstrations continue to 
be held in different localities of Japan, 
the meetings passing condemnatory res- 
olutions, but there has been no further 
violence. 

The claims made by China against 
Russia and Japan for damages done by 
the armies in Manchuria may be sub- 
mitted to The Hague tribunal for ar- 
bitrament. 

The Norwegian steamer Venezia was 
wrecked on September 10 near Skallin- 
gen, on the southwest coast of Jutland. 
The master and his wife and ten of the 
■ icw were drowned. 

It is reported in St. Petersburg that 
the Shah of Persia has borrowed $7,500 
COO from Russia, and it is said that this 
is part of Russia's plan to get a foot- 
hold in Persia. 

The Suez Canal lias been closed tem- 
porarily owing to the sinking of the 
British steamer phathem, loaded with 
dynamite and gelatine. The wreck was 
blown up. 

A severe storm swept over Manila, P. 
1., on September 20, doing great damage 
to shipping and property. A number of 
lives were lost in the native district of 
the city. 

The anniversary of the death of Emile 
Zola was observed in Paris, France, on 
September 29, crowds of people visiting 
the Montmartre Cemetery, when' flowers 
were deposited on his tomb. 

The British steamer Changsha, of 2300 
tons register, belonging to the China 
Navigation Company, which t < . - . • j 1 1 1 \ 
sailed from Hongkong, from Manila, and 
it is feared she was lost in the recent i\ 
phoon. 

The International Navigation Con 
gress was opened at Milan, Italy, on 
September 25 in the presence of Ring 
Victor Emmanuel and Queen Eelena 
and the Cabinet Ministers. Thirty-six 
nations were represented. 

Pour minor officials were killed and 
over twenty persons were wounded by 
thi ■ plosion of a bomb .it the Pekin 
(China) Railway station, on Septembei 
24. Prince Tsai Cheu and Wu Ting Fang 
were among the Injured 

A London Standard correspondent re- 
ports t he formation of a bi fap 
anese shipowning and carrying combin- 
ation, with a capital of $25,000,000. It 
will take over about forty steam 
varying from 200(1 to 3.000 ions each, 
which Japan acquired Cor transport 
work during the war, and will use them 
i h nil, for centralizing the Japa i i 
Lng trade. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



Thirty-two men engaged in decorat- 
ing the new Capitol at Harrisburg, Pa., 
have gone on strike in sympathy with 
the Philadelphia house painters. 

It is reported that three of the best- 
organized local unions of teamsters in 
Chicago have voted to repudiate the re- 
cent election of National officers for the 
Brotherhood. 

The employing painters of Philadel- 
phia, Pa., have asked for an injunction 
to prevent a sympathetic strike of mech- 
anics employed on operations with the 
dissatisfied journeymen painters. 

The Board of Directors of the Na- 
tional Association of Manufacturers has 
ailnpted resolutions calling upon the 
numbers to aid employing printers to 
fight the demands for an eight-hour day. 

The Philadelphia Central Labor 
in ion has protested to Mayor Weaver 
against the "hostility" of the partisan 
police in the Labor Day parade and in- 
dorsed the building trades' condemns 
tion of the North American. 

Shelby Smith, the principal in the fa- 
mous "Smith Case" in the recent eon 
vention of the International Typograph- 
ical Union, has obtained an order en- 
joining the Philadelphia branch of that 
organization from expelling him. 

The inmates of the New Jersey State 
Prison have stopped making mail bags, 
because of the law prohibiting the use 
of convict labor on Government con- 
tracts. A Trenton factory, employing 
100 persons, has taken up the work. 

The strike of union printers in the 
newspaper and job offices of the Argus 
Company, at Albany, N. Y., has ended, 
the company having signed an agree- 
ment for an eight-hour workday for all 
departments. 

It is announced that the International 
Typographical Union has secured 
signatures of all the proprietors of job 
printing offices in San Diego, Cal., to 
an agreement for an eight-hour day, be- 
ginning January 1. 

The anthracite coal operators declare 
that they will not, under any consider- 
ation, grant the demand of the mine- 
workers for an eight-hour day, and that 
they proposed to agree only that the 
present agreement shall be continued. 

The Chicago union freight handlers 
have voted to accept the old wage scale 
and conditions which have prevailed for 
two years, and agreements to that ef- 
fect were made with nineteen railroads 
against which strikes have been threat- 
ened for the past few days. 

Wisconsin and Minnesota farmers 
have formed unions, and will affiliate 
with the Chicago labor unions through 
the American Federation of Labor, it 
the local labor leaders can bring about 
a proposed alliance for offensive and de- 
fensive purposes. 

The band of the Second Regiment, 
National Guard of California, has been 
mustered out, owing to the fact that it 
refused to parade on Memorial Day in 
Sacramento because the ladies of the 
Grand Army of the Republic had en- 
gaged a non-union drum corps. 

A verdict of $100,000 against the 
of Chicago was given the Panhandle 
Railroad on September 19 in a damage 
suit brought because of the burning of 
a number of freight cars belonging to 
the railroad company during the Ameri- 
can Railway Union strike of 1894. 

The French steamer Canada arrived 
at Colon on September 18, bringing 
from Martinique 600 laborers for work 
on the Panama Canal. They will be 
sent to the Pariso, Culebra and Padre 
Miguel sections. The Government of 
the Canal Zone paid the passage of these 
laborers, and will also provide them with 
lodgings, hospital and commissariat 
coupons. The majority of the men ar- 
rived penniless. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



SAWTELLE CLOTHING STORE 

H. A. SCHWARTZ. Prop. 



Headquarters for Seamen's Wearing Apparel. 
A complete line of Union Made goods in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats, Furnishing Goods, 
Oil Clothing, Rubber Boots, etc., etc. 



AGENTS FOR W. L. DOUGLAS SHOES 

$3.00 to $5.00, Union Made. 



Just around corner 
from Union Office. 



307 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



HERMAN SCHULZE 
CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

Cigars at Wholesale and Rotail 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F 

EUREKA. CAL. 



White Labor Only 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

3. A. ANDEBSON, Proprietor. 



BOARD AND LODGING 

$5.00 PER WEEK. 
Neatest and Cleanest Place in Town. 



CORNER FIRST AND D STREETS. 



The Finest Beer Brewed on the Coast 
by the 

Humboldt Brewing Co. 

2996-3048 Broadway. 

red ami shipped to any part of 
the City and County on short notice. 



SMOKED 

The "Popular Favorites," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second St., EUREKA, CAB. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

First-class Board and Lodging 

sonable Rates. 



Front Street, between C and D, 
EUREKA, CAB. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG. 



Manufacturer of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups. Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
eii. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottler and dealer in En- 
terprise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAB. 



The lurid Lcdgini Fosse 

F. BOBGES, Proprietor. 

NEATEST AND CLEANEST PLACE 
IN EUREKA. 



313 FIRST STREET. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 

OSCAR SWANSON, Proprietor. 

An old-time Union Man. 



lard and lodging,, jr. per week. 
Single meals, 2B< 1 and 50c. 



322 First Street, between B and E, 
EUREKA, CAB. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



5 



ISSUED BV AUTHORITY OP 




MAISTENEO 



«a 



From 
.Maker to Wearer.. 



The only Clothing Establishment on the Pacific Coast selling goods at less 
than Eastern Prices. 

JACOBSK \ . CLOTHI E R 

Manufacturer and Retailer 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS ANB FURNISHINGS. 

812 and 814 FIRST AVENUE. SEATTBE, WASH. 




CLOTHING HOUSE 

Wholesale and Retail 

Clothing, Furnishing: Goods 
Boots, Shoes 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits 

ALL UNION MADE GOODS 

Only Union Clerks Employed. 
SEATTBE, WASH. 




SEAIILE NAUTICAL Stiilll 

navigation and nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH Principal 

Miss Helen C. Smith Assistant 

Graduate of Trinity Nautical Col 
Author of Self-Instructor in Naviga- 
tion. Successful Compass Adjuster, 
n license unlimited. Steam and 
sail, American and British. 
472 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300 



SHOE & CLOTHING COMPANY 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 



615=617 First Ave. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



OPPOSITE 
TOTEM FOBE 



THE "OUR HOUSE" CIGAR STORt 

E. J. HABERER, Proprietor, 

151 WASHINGTON ST., SEATTBE. 



Carries a full line of Cigars, Tobaccos 
and Smokers' Articles. 

UNION-MADE GOOBS A SPECIABTY. 
Telephone End. 118. 



When Purchasing from our Advertisers Always Mention the 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



LETTER LIST. 



(Continued from Page 13.) 



HONOBUBU, H. T. 



Anderson, Gilbert 
P.aldvin, Melmer 
Hasel, c-usuif 
1 1 abraber, w. 
Johnson. II. 
Jorgensen, Ras- 
muss 



Lange, Max 
Larson, Werner 
Molden, Jalcot 
Olber, Morsehins 
O'Harrow, Frank E. 
Pad. S. V.-478 
Sundberg, John 



Jorgensen. Rasmus Wiebroc, Charley 

I, William 

EUREKA, CAB. 



Andersen, Chas. 
Arversen, Arturt 
Boysson, B. C. 
Didricks, Dlllef. 
I'lenrie, Georges 
Forstrom, H.-500 
rgr, J.-622 
Hansen. Hans T. 
Hornberg, G. P. 



Larsen. Alfred 
Olsen, Anton 
Olsen, Arthur G. 
Olsen. H. 
Potujansky, R. 
Rohde, Robert 
Spreeslis. F. 
Toriuk, Christian 
Wallmrg. oJhn 



TACOMA, WASH. 



Anderson, Alfred 
Benhardsen, C. 

1. David 
< 'hristianson. All' 
ton 

. Chas-524 
Eckland, Otto 
• (rant, Bert 
Harju. K. G. 
Hansen, Carl 
Hubsher, W. 
Hansen, Maurice 
Johansson, Knut 
lohanssen, 0. 
Kunlgk, A. 
Larsen, John 
t.eupstadius, Chas 
'.ie .Jens L. 



J.Ltndblom, Wolter 
Lowe, John A. 
Mooney, Thomas 
Mvhrvold, Krlst 
Nelson, I. H.-777 
Nissen, Jens 
Nordeland, George 

B. 
Olson, A-621 
Petterson, Oscar 
Petterson, Richard 
Ross, Ben 
Scharjen, John 
Schultz, Alex. 
Tham, Charles 
Thomas, Hamon 

. Thomsen, Thomas 
Voss. Peter N. 



WHEN DRINKING BEER 




SEE THAT THIS LABEL 
IS ON THE KEG OR BOTTLE 



EUREKA, CAL. 



J. Perrv P. Hess 

M2P UNION TRANSFER 

Baggage and Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES 
Office, 119 D Street 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDG. 
Phone Main 70. EUREKA, CAL. 

FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
SQUARE MEAL 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D St., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



ASTORIA, OR. 



COLUMBIA RIVER 

Fishermen's Protective Union 

Headquarters, Astoria. Or. 

H. M. LOBNTSEN, Secretary, 

P. O. Box 138. 

The Reading Room Is open at all 

times to Members of the 

Sailors' Union. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



EXPRESS No. 101 



Stand near Sailors' Union Office. 

Also Furnished Rooms. Call at Cigar 

Store, 201 Buruside St. 

T. T. JOHNSON, 

Phone Scott 5922. Portland, Or. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



B0NNEY & STEWART 

UNDERTAKERS 

Third & Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 



Preparing bodies for shipping a 
specialty. All orders by telephone 
or telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

240 Montgomery St., Cor. Fine. 

Rooms 14-15-16. Phone Main 5719. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 



CITY FRONT DRUG STORE 

W. It. BOURNS, Proprietor. 



10 Mission Street 
Phone Bush 810. San Prancisco. 

Careful attention given to Supply- 
ing Ships with Drugs. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 California Street, San Prancisco. 



Guaranteed Capital and 

Surplus $2,500,098.42 

Capital actually paid up 

in cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, June 30, 1905... 37,738,672.17 



Board of Directors. 
John Lloyd, President; Daniel Mey- 
er, 1st Vice-President; Emil Rohte, 2d 
Vice-President; Ign. Steinhart, T . N. 
Walter, N. Ohlandt, J. W. Van B«rgen, 
F. Tillmann Jr., and E. T. Kruse. 



A. H. R. Schmidt, Cashier; Wm. 
Hermann, Asst. Cashier; Geo. Tourny, 
Secretary; A. H. Muller, Asst. Secre- 
tary; W. S. Goodfellow, General Atty. 



California Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company 

Receives Savings Deposits of 
Ten Dollars and Upwards. 

IT PAYS INTEREST 

TWICE A YEAR. 

Bate — 

3% per cent on ordinary accounts 
3 6/10 per cent on term accounts 



CAPITAL &. SURPLUS, 
TOTAL ASSETS. - 



$ 1,521.7)1.98 
7,888,697.13 



Deposits may be made by P. O. 
Order, Wells-Fargo Money Order 
or Bank Draft 

Send for Pamphlets Descriptive 
of our Business 



OFFICES 

Cor. California and Montgomery Sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




A PUSH IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION. 

It's our privilege and pleasure to give 
you. If you are not a bank depositor, 
become one to-day in any good bank — 
of course we prefer it to be ours. You'll 
thank us some day for this advice — es- 
pecially if you adopt it. Saving ever so 
little accumulates money for hard 
times. 

We pay 3% per cent interest on sav- 
ings accounts, and 4 per cent on term 
deposits, both compounded semi-annu- 
ally. 

The bank is open from 5 to 8 p. m. 
Saturdays for those who cannot call 
earlier. 

THE MARKET STREET BANK 

Seventh and Market Sts., 

San Francisco. 



California Undertaking Co. 

PRIVATE - RESIDENCE - PARLORS 

B* J. Devon. Manager 
Wm M. LlNoecv, Secretary 

7)3 POST ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

EMBALMING * SPECIALTY 

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT TELEPHONE CAST 1283 



Frank J. Symmes, President Henry Brunner, Cashier 

Chas. Nelson, Vice-President F. F. Ouer, Asst. Cashier 

O. A. Hale, Vice-President Otto Ottesen, Asst. Cashier 

E. W. Runyon, Vice-President 

CENTRAL TRUST CO. OF CALIFORNIA 

42 Montgomery Street, Corner of Sutter Street, SAN FRANCISCO 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS PAID IN- - - $1,765,000.00 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

3 l 4 r ." per Annum on Ordinary Deposits 3 6/10% per Annum on Term Deposits 

We sell Drafts and Money Orders on all cities 
in Norway, Sweden and Denmark at Cheapest Rates 
Our Bank in Norway is: Our Bank In Denmark is: 

Central Banken for Norge in Den Danske Landmands Bank In 

Christiania. Copenhagen. 

Our Bank in Sweden is: Skanes Enskilda Bank in Malmo. 
We write and speak the Scandinavian langmag-es. 
DIRECTORS: 
F. W. Dohrmann James Madison 
Frank J. Symmes Gavin McNab 
Henry Brunner 
C. C. Moore 
W. A. Frederick 



Chas. Webb Howard 
Geo. C. Perkins 
Mark L. Gerstle 
E. A. Denicke 
O. A. Hale 



Charles F. Leege 
J. M. Vance 
Charles Nelson 



John M. Keith 
E. W. Runyon 
G. H. Umbsen 
R. D. Hume 



FRANK 
BROS. 



Union-made Clothes 
Tailor-made Clothes 
Underwear V* Shoes 
Hats ^ ^ ^ * 



Cor.KEARNY&SACRAMENTOSTS. 

San Francisco. 



M. A. MAHER 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS 

Boots, Tobacco, Cutlery, etc. 
United Working'men's Shoes. 

Also Agency for the Orthopedic Shoe 



206 East St., near Howard. 
Phone Red 4272. San Francisco, 



JOE HARRIS 

SEA-FARING MEN'S OUTFITTER 

Ready-Made Uniforms. 

Cap Making a Specialty. 

5 JACKSON ST., NEAR EAST, 

Tel. John 3561. San Francisco. 



EXPRESSING 

Done by 

CHRIS. JORTALL 

Stand at Union Office, 
Southwest Corner East and Mission Sts. 



GREEN'S UNION STORE 

14 CLAY ST., one Block North of 
Market St., near Ferry. 

SAILORS' OUTFITS 

Best quality Rubber Boots and Oil 
Clothing, Shoes, Flannel Underwear, 
Hats, etc. 

ALL WITH THE UNION LABEL. 
We give you a square deal. 



C. J. BERENDES 

SOUTH SIDE HOTEL 

806 THIRD STREET, 

Between Berry and Kingf Streets. 

The rooms are all newly furnished 
and the accommodations first class. 
Board and Lodging, $5 per week. All 
rooms single. 



D. EDWARDS 

4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

We sell the kind of Goods you require. 
Extra Strong Hickory Shirts \ 
Best Overalls \ UNION 

Good Lumber Shoes LABEL 

Stockton Flannel Underwear/ 
Mso a full line of Gentlemen's Furnish- 
ing Goods and Hats. Look at our 
goods. You will be pleased. No trou- 
ble to show ilietn 



ODD FELLOWS CEMETERY 

AT COLMA 

Near San Francisco 

Is now ready for interments 

Telephones West HU6 and 

Church 5568 



SMOKE 



RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO. 

324 BATTERY ST., S. F. 




Well 
Heeled 

That's what the average Sailor 
needs to be — well shod, too, and 
no better way than to just buy 
Red Front shoes. This is our new 
Department that we want you to 
know more about. 



YOUR FALL SUIT 

What about it? Bought it yet? 
No ? Well, get next to our styles — 
let us put a tape around your 
manly form and see the results — 
good, honest clothing — prices fair 
and square — stiff breezes which 
should blow your patronage 
through our doorway. 



The Red Front 
Clothing Co. 

MARKET ST., P b ^ ell 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



STILL ON DECK 

ED. ANDERSEN 

7 FAST ST., NEAR MARKET 

Cigars, Tobacco and Notions 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY. 
LUMBER HOOKS. 



Union Boot and 
Shoe Store... 

Repairing Neatly Done 

C. LESTER 
12 Stenart Street. 




Domestic and Naval. 



A re-inspection of all steamers in the 
United States was ordered on September 
26 by the Department of Commerce and 
Labor. 

Miss Fanny Kagan, a steerage passen- 
ger on the White Star liner Cretic, has 
sued that company for $10,000 damages 
for indignities forced upon her by mem- 
bers of the vessel 's crew. 

James W. Boyd, a clerk in the Public 
Health and Marine Hospital Service, 
at Washington, D. C, was recently ar 
rested, charged with embezzlement. He 
admits having abstracted at least $20, 
000 in the last three years. 

The Hamburg-American Steamship 
Company's first turbine steamer, the 
Kaiser, made a successful trial trip at 
Hamburg on September 26, reaching 
twenty-seven miles an hour, or a mile 
above the contract stipulation. 

The State Department has been in- 
formed that Prince Louis of Battenborg 
will be in Washington, D. C, on Novem- 
ber 2. The report from Halifax that 
the visit of the British squadron to the 
United States has been abandoned is 
erroneous. 

Hugh Blaik, a large shipowner and a 
pioneer in the shipping business between 
Leith and American ports, died at the 
former place on September 26. Mr. 
Blaik had been blind for twenty years, 
but he continued to personally direct his 
extensive interests.. 

The largest cargo of grain ever 
shipped out of Chicago was cleared on 
September 29, on the steamer George 
H. Russell. It consisted of 235,000 
bushels of corn and 58,000 bushels of 
barley, aggregating 5572 tons. The 
cargo went to Buffalo. 

A spar about four feet above water, 
attached to wreckage, was passed by the 
British schooner Nicanor, which recently 
arrived at Philadelphia, Pa., from Slier- 
brook, N. S. The spar was passed on 
September 14, twenty miles southeast of 
Fire Island Lightship. 

Orders for 100,000 tons of shipping 
have been placed with Clyde (Scotland) 
shipbuilders during the past month, 
while 44,000 tons of new ships were 
launched during the same period. This 
boom is due to the expectation of a great 
increase in the Far Eastern trade now 
that the war is over. 

Among the vessels driven ashore at 
.Manila, P. I., during the recent typhoon 
were the American ship Erskine M. 
Phelps, Captain Graham, which arrived 
on September 8 from Philadelphia; tin- 
American ship Heela, Captain Nelson, 
which arrived on August 30 from Port- 
land, Or., and the Chilean bark Alta, 
' aptain Thonegal. 

The monster ore carrier, John Stan- 
ton, was launched September 17, from 
the yards of the American Shipbuilding 
Company in Lorain. The boat is owned 
by Captain C. L. Hutchinson, of Cleve- 
land, 0.,'and is a 9000-ton vessel, 524 feet 
in length and 54 feet beam. She will go 
into commission in about thirty days. 

Inquiries made in British shipping 
circles have failed to confirm the story 
sent out from Liverpool recently in re- 
gard to the Anglo-Japanese shipping 
combine. Both Sir Alfred Jones and R. 
1). Holt disavow all knowledge of the re- 
port, as does also the Nippon Ynsen 
Kaisha, the Japanese national steamship 
line. 

The schooner Kate B. Ogden arrived 
at Philadelphia, Pa., from Wilmington, 
N. C, reports passing a bell buoy on 
Brown Shoal out of order. The bui 
!iad turned over. A vessel's mast, bee! 
up, extending about eight feet above 
water, was passed by the schooner, E. 
Starr Jones, also arrived from Windsor, 
N. S. The mast was passed on Septem 
ber 10, four miles southeast of Naset 
Light. It was attached to a submerged 
wreckage. 



ltl 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOUKNAL. 



With the "Wits. 

Precise- -" Will you marry mi 
asked bluntly. 

"No;" replied the Boston maiden, 
but she added coyly: "I am nol en 
dowed with sacerdotal power. Pul your 
question properly. Ask me if I will be 
nunc your wife. " 



Fixed.— "It's all right," said Ter- 
rier's platonic friend; "she "ill marry 

you. ' ' 

"Oh, don't make fun of me, Bi 
protested rerner. "You don't know 
anything about it. " 

■ ■ yes, l do. 1 told her to-day thai I 
want) d you. " 

One Way.— "My manuscripts,' 
plained the young writer despondently, 
"are always coming back to me. 

■■Mi tell y,»u." said the editor genial 
lv, "how you can manage all that." 

"Oh, howl" cried the other, brighten 
Lng hopefully. 

" Don 't inclose any stamps. 



mbling.— " That man in there is a 

hypocrite," said .lacksun as he left the 
^tore. 

■■ you mean the druggist!" 

■■ yes. When I went in 1 interrupt e,l 
him in the midst of compounding a pre 
Bcription; 1 told him T wanted a two a a1 
stamp and he smiled as sweetly as it he 

was glad to si B me. " • 

That Means Business.— " Thai boy of 

yours is a pretty spunky little fellow." 

"Oh, I don't know. I heard him 

bullying a much smaller boy the other 
day." 

"But I heard him talk right up to a 

fellow twice his size to-day." 

"That's nothing. The boy who is 
really spunky is one who will talk right 
lip to a hoy his own size. " 



She Had to Forgive— Mrs. Winks— 
"Mrs. Ayres and her husband have had 
a dreadful quarrel, just because she gave 
him a letter to mail and he carried it 
around in his pockets for a week. Isn't 
it too silly of her?" 

Mr. Winks— "Maybe that would make 
you mad too. " 

Mrs. Winks— Oh. John! 1 wouldn't 
lose my temper over a little thing like 
that." 

Mr. Winks— "I'm glad to hear you 
say it, my dear. I just recall thai 1 'vi 
still got that letter you gai 
Wednesday. " 



LUNDSTROM'S 



UNION 

MADE 



$2.50 Hats 






PACIFIC (OAST 

HAT WORKS 

1458 Market St., opposite Central 
Theater, and 605 Kearny Street. 



Solicited. 
: for Illustrated catalogue. 



Bagley's 
Sun Cured 
Tobacco 





\Monmade 
Clothin 




We are one of the pioneers to adopi 
aient Workers. We manufacture all our clothing In 
■ lV „ worksl '11 of it is ma trion men. ours are 

the only thoroughly union clothing stores In San I 

Other stores have only a few union-made lines to show union men 
when they call. I3ut everything is union-made in our store. 

In purchasing here you buy direct from the makers at a savins 
of middlemen's profits. 

i overcoats $10, o ( 3 i.00. 

Made-toorder suits and overcoats $10.00 to $45.00. 
Garments can bo purchased in either one of our two sto 



TWO LARGE 
STORES 




S. N. WOOD & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Cor. POWELL & ELLIS 

AND 740 MARKET 



James A. Sorensen Co. 

WATCHMAKERS, JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 



103 to 111 SIXTH STREET, 
ine Jessie 2821 



Below Mission. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Ml Watch Repairing Warranted for two years. 
ted Free by an Expert i iptfql: 



K> . s 



ALARM CIOCXS REDUCED TO 45 CENTS. 

Open Evenings till B p. m. Saturdays, 10 p. m. 

THE BIG JEWELRY STORE 



SMOKERS 



See thai this 1-bej (In light 

:rs on the hox from which 




Issued by Autfioniyoi the Cigar Makeii International union o< America 

Union-made Cigars. 

alus (CcrlififS. tMWec^ars eonMinta mmis bo. w< »" mm eya fiistCIJss Workman, 

3 MEMBER Of THE CIGAR MAKERS' INTtflNATlOVAl UNION ol Am«Ka J1 oraalWJIiOA OevOlefl rothead- 
vancemMI ol Iht MQRAi MATEBIALjno MtUlICtM (VI.IARE Of Thf CMrf. Twie<oic«e ucommeiK) 
these Cioais to all smofcers throughout tie weld 

wlibe punned according to law 



All Infringement:, upon this label I 



TV. U2A4t<4t4. Prrstderd, 

C if I l-,fAmmr, 




PATRONIZE UNION INDUSTRY 

SHOKE UNION-MADE CIGARS THAT BEAR 
THE ABOVE LABEL 



(Otherwise known as SAM.) 

808 THIRD STREET 

Eetween Kinx and Berry Sts., £an Francisco. 

GENTS', YOUTHS' AND BOYS* CLOTH. NG 

i ient a' F lo Is, Hats, < laps, Ti ui I tc, ] 

of all kinds. Everything strlctlj 
L'NION MADE Si men's outfits a specialty. 

i r j on w ma rkel i rice give me a i " 

n is take LOOK FOR THE NAME AND NUMBER 



Taylor's Nautical School 



Save Front 
of Wrappers 
and Pouches 
for 
Premiums 



Every Package bears 
the Union Label 




506 



BATTERY STREET 

COB. WASHINGTON ST. 



istom House SAN FRANCISCO 



Moving Sales 
At HALE'S 

.Many departments are already mov- 
ing into new quarters. 

Other departments are anticipa- 
ting moving orders to come soon. 
The new building is one week 
nearer completion, but not near 
enough as yet to hold the stocks 
we had planned to fill it with. 

Anil our new goods are coming in 
every day — putting us lo our wits' 
ends. For many utock rooms, al- 
ready cram full, refuse to receive 
more. There is only one way out 
of the difficulty and we have taken 
it. 

Marked prices that are hurrying 
goods out rapidly from every de- 
partment. 

No matter what you need — you can 
likely save largely— by buying at 
llale'e, now. 



Open at 9. Closed at 6 every day 

MARKET ST., NEAR SIXTH 
San Francisco 



-Mi Pacific Co ist. Li 

' equipped private Nautical Scl i 

in tiic United States. Graduates pr> 

• Ami rican and British Merchant 
Examinations. Warrant officers oi 
States Navy pi 
animation tor commissioned offli 

er i n g th e 
Naval Academy and American Mer- 
chant Ma i I 

Taylor's Modern Navigation, a book for 
both young and old navigators, is now In 
of every Pacific Mall Steam- 
ship, In many Universities, .-11111 is highly 

I by many noted nay! 
Send for circulars and testimonials. 



Union 
Clothing Store 

A COMPLETE BTI ICK I >F 

Sailors' and Firemen's Clothing 
ar-d General Supplies. 



ERNEST COLBY 

VJ\'z Steuart Street, 







Lyons 

Tnelargest first class 
tailorind'ostablishment 

on the Tacific Coast 
vis ing 
this 




Suits to'ortler 
from $1622 U V 
Trousers to order 
from$gOO up 

Samples and Self-Measurement Blanks 
free by mail 

^CHARLES LYONS 
VsJ LondonTailor A 

*72 1 Market $ 122 Kearar sT 





SCOTTY'S MILWAUKEE 
SWEATERS & JACKETS 

I I iv.- stood the test against all 

competitors. 

Lake Paring- Men All Know It. 

SWEATERS SENT BY 
MAIL FOB $3.00 
Beware of Imitations. 

WILLIAM LISLE 

"SCOTTY" 

III Menomenee St., Milwaukee, Wis. 






ttiSfiSfii 

FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 

Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



Vol. XIX. No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1905. 



Whole No. 939. 



AUSTRALIAN LABOR PRESS. 



A Great Power in the Commonwealth. 



Tom Lauder, of Melbourne, Gives His Experience. 



THERE is probably no country in the world with 
such a variety of labor newspapers as Australia. 
When one takes into consideration tbe small- 
ness of that island continent <s population, it might 
further be stated that it has, proportionately, the 
largest newspaper-reading public in the world, and the 
most critical. Every bush hamlet of a few thousand 
inhabitants luxuriates in its local organ; every 
shearer 's hut or miner 's camp is lost without its 
weekly sheet. And so, out of the fact that even the 
man away "out back" — away on the dreary, sun- 
scorched plains — is interested in getting news of his 
fellowmen, has arisen what is now widely known 
throughout Australia as the Labor Press. 

This press had very humble beginnings. Fifteen 
year3 ago it was but the "baseless fabric of an 
empty dream." But the "baseless fabric" very 
speedily assumed concrete shape, until to-day labor 
papers exercise as much power in the Government of 
Australia as any of the most unscrupulous capitalistic 
dailies. 

It was about the period of the Shearers' strike in 
Queensland — the year 1893 — that the Brisbane Work- 
er, then under the control of William Lane, came into 
prominence. It had already been running, but its 
mission as a really live force may be put down at or 
about the period named. Lane, its first editor, achiev- 
ed some small notoriety as the founder of New Aus- 
tralia, a communistic experiment in Paraguay, des- 
tined to collapse and shatter the many ideals of its 
undoubtedly honest and self-sacrificing founder. 
Under Lane's editorship, the Worker gradually forg- 
ed its way ahead. Lane was a brilliant worker, al- 
though somewhat visionary. Still, the little weekly, 
under his care, speedily became known all over a ter- 
ritory as large as France, Germany, Holland, Bel- 
gium and the British Isles combined. Hence grew 
into power a strongly organized union sentiment, and 
a host of speakers and writers, fully prepared to 
crystallize that sentiment into a permanent legislative 
factor. 

The influence exercised by the Brisbane Worker 
would probably be thwarted were it not for the solid 
and subsidized support it receives from the Queens- 
land bush workers. These toilers, rough and un- 
couth as many of them may be, form the vanguard of 
all that is truest and best in Australian laborism. To 
these men, therefore, the Worker of Queensland owe3 
practically its existence during the years that have 
gone, and it will continue to claim their protection 
during the years that are to come. To these men the 
Worker is more than the Bible itself — it is their 
Bible! To one, like the writer, who knows some- 
thing about Queensland, such a paper as the Worker 
and the men who support it, form the beacon toward 



which organized labor is marching, steadfast in the 
hope of securing better industrial and social condi- 
tions for the masses. 

Next to the Worker, Queensland can boast of some 
ten or twelve labor, or semi-labor, weeklies. Probably 
the most important is, or was, the Charters Towers 
New Eagle. Charters Towers is a strong labor center 
in Northern Queensland. It is situated some five 
hundred miles above the Tropic of Capricorn, and is 
noted for its gold, saloons and thirst. It is a veri- 
table treasure-house for the enterprising saloonkeeper. 
What Brisbane is to Southern Queensland, so is Char- 
ters Towere to Northern Queensland. And its labor 
weekly takes proportionate rank. 

Midway between Northern and Southern Queens- 
land lies Central Queensland, the leading city of which 
is Rockhampton. For a very long period Rockhamp- 
ton supported the People 's Newspaper, a labor week- 
ly, which exercised no small influence over that part 
of the State. Eventually a big and prolonged drought 
struck the central district, and among other ravages 
tore away the financial supports that bad hitherto kept 
the labor organ in fairly sound condition. Not very 
long after its collapse, however, another labor weekly, 
the Critic by name, appeared — Northern, Central and 
Southern Queensland still being represented in labor 
journalism. Thus, the labor press in Queensland 
stands in a very promising position. Its future is 
bound up with the prosperity of the State, and also 
with the amount of enterprise its supporters put into 
it. Queensland is a rich State, offering almost illim- 
itable opportunities for enterprise and initiative, 
and nowhere can these leading qualities be better 
exercised than in the expansion of the Australian 
labor press in that State of the Commonwealth. 
Queensland practically inaugurated the Australian 
labor press. Now it has an opportunity to carry it 
further and further toward its goal. 

About seven and one-half years ago a number of men 
interested in advanced economic ideals foregathered in 
Melbourne. At that time it seemed almost an im- 
possibility to establish a worker 's paper in Victoria, 
various previous attempts having proved unmistakable 
failures. However, a further attempt was made, and 
out of that attempt the Tocsin was established — a 
papCT which at varying periods has shown promise of 
better results than ordinarily have fallen to the lot of 
newspapers. There are reasons, however, why the 
optimistic desires of some of its promoters have 
tailed to materialize. Those reasons I shall show 
immediately. 

Among the founders of the Tocsin were two dif- 
ferent types of character — men with a conscience ami 
men without a conscience. In other words, there 
were men who considered it practicable to put into 



effect the most advanced ideas — those who might be 
termed socialistic dreamers — and there were men who 
only saw in the establishment of a people 's weekly 
the gratification of their own selfish ends and their 
political advancement. Needless to say, in course of 
time the latter element triumphed, and the Tocsin, 
instead of fulfilling its founders ' ideas — that of a 
genuine Victorian Labor-Socialist newspaper — eventu- 
ally became a mere advertising sheet for a few 
political adventurers. That is how matters stood when 
the writer quit the editorial chair, eighteen months 
ago. 

I first became connected with the Tocsin in the year 
1900. At that time the paper was very poorly printed ; 
contained but little news of any paramount interest 
to the worker, or any one else ; had a miserably small 
circulation, and generally consisted of eight pages, 
demy folio, interspersed with cheap advertisements, 
such as ' ' Mother Seigel 's Curative Syrup, ' ' and ' ' Dr. 
Williams' Pink Pills for Pale People." 

To this little sheet I contributed twenty-six articles 
dealing with my experience in South Africa. These 
articles won eulogistic references from no less a liter- 
ary authority than Professor Rentvul, of the Mel- 
bourne University. In addition they assisted mater- 
ially in increasing the circulation of the paper, at that 
period struggling along with a bare weekly output of 
about 1700 copies. 

During this period the Tocsin was under the liter- 
ary guidance of a philosophic anarchist — one, never- 
theless, of the gentlest men who ever put pen to paper. 
Under the auspices of that writer the paper was noted 
for long disquisitions rather than for short, pithy 
paragraphic matter. The result was that, however 
good the long articles were, the workers were not in- 
clined to bite, and the circulation remained stationary. 

Eventually the poor fellow who then held the helm 
became very ill, and after twelve months of protracted 
■.-suffering died in a public hospital. 

For some considerable time previous to his death 
I had been appointed to the editorial post. That po- 
sition I held for nearly two years, and while holding 
it the circulation of the Tocsin went up as high as 
10,000. This, of course, was a somewhat abnormal 
jump from 1700; but, at all events, I managed to get. 
a standing circulation of 5000. In addition the paper 
was considerably improved, both in typographical ap- 
pearance and in style of literary get up. 

However, I found the grafting clement which had, 
as elsewhere stated, wiped out all opposition, so se- 
curely entrenched that it was well nigh impossible to 
do anything with the paper. I saw clearly that its 
usefulness as a labor weekly was over, ami that the 
only chance for the workers of Victoria lay in the es- 
tablishment of another and thoroughly representative 
weekly. In a big city like Melbourne, and in such a 
strongly radical State as my native Slate of Victoria, 
there is ample room for a. genuine people's weekly. 
It is my intention — all being well— to make the at- 
tempt at no distant period, if not in Victoria, well, 
in some other State or colony of Australasia. How 
ever, one tiling is certain, the labor press in Victoria 
is only such in name now. The advent of the grafter 
has completely demolished it as a potent factor in in- 
dustrial affairs. In time, perhaps, the Victorian 
worker will begin to understand the situation. That 

time, it is to be hoped, is not far distant. 



Tom Lai dee, 



San Francisco. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Australian Notes. 



(For the Coast Seamen's Journal.) 



Old Times on the Coast. 



I suppose you have seen an account of the 
great Land frauds here. As we do not re- 
ceive very reliable reports through the press, 
we will hare to wait for a true account of the 
Commission now sitting. 

The Wharf Lumpers have (heir case before 
the Arbitration Court just at present. It has 
lasted now three weeks and is likely to con- 
tinue one week more. The barrister who is 
conducting the case is \Y. M. Hughes, one of 
our Labor party. He is one of the crowd who 
has risen from the ranks, and has been the 
means of organizing the Longshoremen's 
Onion, the Trolly and Carters' Union, and 
has done good work in the labor movement in 
general. 

The employers have banded toe-ether to de- 
feat the Trade-Union Label, in the Federal 
Parliament, and the strongest argument that 
is being used against it is the articles in the 
Coast Seamen 's Journal. Naturally enough, 
they show how you have your fair ami unfair 
list printed. 

This season is supposed to 1"' one of the 
best that Australia has had for a considerable 
time, especially in the wool and wheat lines. 
The building trades are brisk; also a very con- 
siderable number of buildings are being torn 
down and more substantial ones are being 
erected. There is a very strong agitation be- 
ing carried on here in connection with the 
construction of locomotives in this country, as 
we contend that they can be manufactured 
here equally as well as in America: but the 
bone of contention is that they should be 
made by the Government in its workshops at 
Eveleigh, and a great many people say that 
every shop that is run as a private concern 
should have the opportunity of sending in 
tenders for their construction. As the Gov- 
ernment debars a person over forty years old 
from obtaining permanent employment, you 
see that the people are very much divided in 
their opinions. 

Our Eight-Hour Demonstration Day falls 
on October 2, and we are making greal 
preparations, as tins is our Jubilee 
year. The Attorney-General has stopped the 
selling of our "Art Union" tickets on the 
streets, but we have made arrangements to 
give a good discount to shopkeepers as an in- 
centive. The first prize is valued at £500 and 
the second at £100, and there are about 100 
other smaller prizes. 

Shipping is fairly brisk here at present, as 
far as our Union is concerned. As far as the 
Longshoremen '8 Union is concerned, things 
are rather dull this month, but the season 
commences next week, so that there is a bright 
outlook. 

The unemployed problem is still very much 
discussed here. As you are aware, our cities 
are very far apart and are not as getatable 
as yours, and as all out of work flock to the 
cities, we always have a good-sized crowd 
here. The Government has now taken the 
matter up and established relief works, but 
the pittance paid is so small that very few 
trouble them. Of course, about eighty per 
cent of the unemployed are not trade-union- 
ists. Ed. A. Kelly. 

Sydney, X. S. YV.. Sept 10. 1905. 



The Province of Milan is one < f the impor- 
tant centres of Italy. It contains 300 silk 
mills, giving employment to 40,000 workmen; 
200 cotton mills, with 25.000 workmen, and 
twenty woolen mills, with 3.000 workmen. 



Thirty-one years ago the writer severed his 
connection with the United States Navy, hav- 
ing, at that time, completed a term of sixteen 
and one-half years continuous service as boy 
and man. Ignorant of the conditions exist- 
ing on the Pacific Coast, I foolishly imagin- 
ed that I would be able to earn and save 
more money in the merchant service than I 
possibly eoidd in the Navy. The illusion was 
quickly dispelled. 

Walking the water-front day after day, so- 
liciting a chance to ship from every skipper 
and mate along the beach. I saw my "reserve 
fund" slowly disappearing. Requests for em- 
ployment usually met with the question: 
'Who are you boarding with?" After meet- 
ing with much discouragement I finally 
scraped acquaintance with an old sailor who 
kept a little place on Mission street, right op- 
posite where the Sailors' Hall now stands. 
This man was known as "Uncle Sam," a name 
well known to the seafaring fraternity many 
years ago. I was put wise, and with a letter of 
introduction in my pocket I laid a course for 
the "New York and Brooklyn Exchange, " 
kept by Pete McMahon, as honest an old chap 
as ever ran a boarding house. Having a little 
money to spend on "red eye," I was made wel- 
come, and shown to my boudoir, which I oc- 
cupied in company with nine other "sons of 
the sea" and innumerable little animals called 
bed bugs. Here I stayed, enjoying all the 
comforts of an "ill-spent life," until the size 
of my "slate" compelled Pete to find a ship. 
So one fine morning, the bar-keep said : "Well, 
Shamus, a foine ship I have for ye." "Yes! 
and where is she going?" "To Liverpool, my 
lad." "Not on yer life. I'm going to ship in 
the Navy again." The result was that next 
day found "Shamus" engaged on the bark 
Oakland, bound for the Sound, wages fixed at 
the magnificent sum of twenty dollars a month. 

Here I found a forecastle large enough to 
accommodate about a dozen chickens, lined with 
bunks for ten men. After a little good-natured 
growling among ourselves and curses loud and 
deep on ships and owners in general, duds 
were stowed away and work commenced. We 
had a quick but stormy passage to Cape Flat- 
tery, and then the fun commenced, beating up 
the Straits to Port Townsend. Thirteen solid 
days and nights; wet, cold, and hungry; never 
a drop of hot coffee or sufficient chuck at sup- 
per time to enable us to save a bite for the 
middle watch. Braces and pumps, pumps and 
braces. Oh, ye steam-schooner mules, what 
a snap you have got! 

Well, we finally made Port Townsend and 
were wind-bound for a couple of days. Up 
anchor and off for Port Madison ; made Ap- 
ple Tree Cove and dropped anchor for the 
night. Next day made Madison, but had to 
kedge about a mile and a half from anchorage 
to wharf. No steamers for towing ships then 
— no lumber ready. Stripped to a gantling 
and re-fitted. Weather bad; frost, snow and 
rain. No oilskins. Twenty dollars for a pair 
of blankets in the store; no stove in the fore- 
castle, and sudden death to go near the galley. 
Oh, the good old times! Grub stopped one 
Sunday because we would not shovel snow off 
deckload and clean brass on the poop. Begged 
l<r charity at the County Jail, kept by one 
of nature's old-time gentlemen, Sheriff Wil- 
liams of Kilsap County. Got two good square 
meals, and my mouth is watering now at the 
thoughts of them. Finished loading. Sailed; 
arrived safely in 'Frisco. Six inches less 
around the waist and two inches long- 



er in the arms! Went to office for 
our pay and got — what? A due bill 
payable in thirty days. Paid "boarding-mast- 
er" ten per cent for cashing it. After deduct- 
ing the amount of his bill— among the items 
of which we found five dollars charged for 
"the chance," one dollar for taking our 
things on board, one dollar for bringing them 
(in shore again — we were given what was left, 
and damned little of it there was. Hurrah 
for "Bottle Meiers!" "Play mit der fiddle 
up, to hell mit der oilskins!" In forty- 
eight hours we were ready for sea 
again. 

Such was the Coast in the "good 
old days." Do we wish for their 
return? God forbid! The hardships and 
petty meannesses that were endured by 
Jack in those days are almost incredible. 
Ships went to sea in the winter with barely 
enough provisions and water to reach the port 
of destination under the most favorable cir- 
cumstances. Fourteen, and often sixteen 
hours constituted a day's work. Ill fed. ill 
clothed and ill treated, it is no wonder the 
Sailors' Union developed a holy hatred of the 
vicious system that permitted such abuses. 
The Sailors' Union has bestowed upon its 
members the greatest good that any man can 
possibly possess — Manhood ! 

The Doctor. 



Toy Trade of Germany. 



The value of toys exported from Germany 
last year was about $13,500,000, of which the 
United States, as the principal customer, took 
nearly $4,000,000. Sonneberg is the chief 
center of this industry. The (handier of 
Commerce of that city, in its last annual re- 
port, has this to say of the toy industry : 

Great Britain has been the principal re- 
cipient of the goods exported from that Son 
neberg) district, but to all appearances it will 
ere long have to surrender first place to the 
United States. The powerful transatlantic 
commonwealth, favored by a rich and increas- 
ing population, has been enabled to retain its 
importing capacity in spite of the protective 
character of its Customs tariff. The messagi 
<0' the President was all the more disappoint- 
ing to us, as the hoped-for reform of the tariff 
and the expected reciprocity treaty was net 
mentioned therein. This is a consummation 
devoutly to be wished, and must be worked 
for by Germany — of course with prudence. 
so as not to imperil our trade relations with 
the United States. The constant care and 
cultivation of these is a life matter for im- 
portant branches of German industries, and 
will continue to remain so as long as our 
products find difficulty in entering the markets 
of Europe. 

Next to the toy industry in Sonneberg is 
the manufacture of china ware, consisting 
chiefly of dinner and tea sets, statuary, paint- 
ed plates and medallions, articles used for 
electrical apparatus, stoppers for bottles. 
marbles for children, and doll heads. The ex- 
ports of this class of merchandise last year 
aggregated 32,406 metric tons, valued at 
nearly $13,000,000, of which 56 per cent came 
to the United States. The manufacture of 
glassware, especially tubes and bottles for 
chemical and medical uses, glass balls, glass 
ornaments for Christmas-tree decorations, etc.. 
is important, as is also the manufacture of 
pearls from fish scabs. Km- all these goods 
the United States is a large customer. Slates 
and slate pencils, masks, and artificial eyes are 
likewise considerable items in the manufac 
ture and export trade of Sonneberg. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



)7<SXiX§®(!X55x»^ 



On the Atlantic Coast. 



(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions.) 



A Case of Eliotism. 



A janitor in a large apartment house in 
New York, writing to the New York Evening- 
Journal, says that he "has often read that to 
succeed in life, as we are told by the big men 
of the day, you should work hard, do more 
than you are expected to do, and you will be 
rewarded." Then he goes on to tell that he 
used to have three boy assistants, but as there 
is rather less work to do in the summer than 
in the winter, he offered early in the 
summer to do the work with only two 
assistants, which offer was accepted by 
the owner. Now that winter is approach- 
ing he would like to have the third assistant 
again, but the owner tells him to keep it up 
with two assistants only, and intimates that he 
must have been loafing before, despite the fact 
that now he has to work from 6 a. m. until 
after midnight. 

This is so evidently a case for the considera- 
tion of those charged with the dissemination 
of the Eliot-Hopkins-Thurber doctrine of 
economics that it is respectfully referred to 
them. It may be pointed out here, in a general 
way, that, as a rule, there is no sentiment in 
business. Employing a man for wages is busi- 
ness ; rewarding him for doing more than he is 
expected, or rather paid to do is sentiment. 
Under the circumstances, perhaps, the best 
rule for workingmen to follow, is the time- 
honored one about returning a fair day's work 
for a fair day's pay, and putting it up to the 
boss that good wages and reasonable hours of 
work are much more acceptable than an oc- 
casional "reward." It has long been recog- 
nized by all who have made the subject a study 
that if men can get justice they will, as a class, 
willingly dispense with charity, and the "re- 
wards" for being a "sucker" are the meanest 
kind of charity. 



The recent order of Secretary Metcalf, of 
the Department of Commerce and Labor, to 
the effect that all steam vessels throughout the 
United States which have not been inspected 
within the last two or three months must be re- 
inspected, contains all the usual emphatic in- 
sistence upon attention to the life-saving 
apparatus and the execution of fire-drills 
by the crews, but not one word about 
the efficiency or numbers of the lat- 
ter. So far as the Department of Commerce 
and Labor is concerned it is evident that as 
long as every steamer carries a landsman to 
couple and uncouple the hose, he will be ac- 
cepted by the Department as an entirely satis- 
factory equivalent for "the crew," all hands 
and the cook. 



The press is just now more or less agitated 
over the "epidemic of crime that is sweeping 
over the land," etc. With the examples of 
corruption, open graft and downright theft 
among our "prominent citizens" before the 
masses, the wonder is not so much that there 
is an "epidemic of crime" in the land as that 
there are any honest men left at all. When 
the ignorant and illiterate are taught by exam- 
ple from those in high places that the posses- 
sion of great wealth, no matter how obtained, 
is the only thing that commands respect and 
deference, what else can be expected from 
them but an "epidemic of crime?" 



Motor Fishing Boats. 

Every once in a while we are brought face 
to face with the fact that the world of to-day 
is, indeed, wonderful, when its scientific ac- 
complishments are compared with those that 
excited the youthful wonder of men now only 
middle-aged. The Marine Journal, discussing 
the merits of motor boats and the steadily in- 
creasing use of them, says i 

One of the greatest fields for these useful vessels 
is among the fisher, oyster, and lobster men all along 
the Atlantic Coast, from Maine to Florida, and the 
fisherman (excepting offshore fishermen), who has not 
a power-propelled boat, is literally out of the race in 
his important calling. This class of hardy toilers no 
longer wait for a favorable breeze to market the 
catch, but when a fair catch is under the hatches, 
away they go to the nearest city, town, or resort, and 
dispose of it to the best advantage. Fishermen only 
need wireless telegraphy now to make their equip- 
ment perfect. With that apparatus on board, any en- 
terprising gatherer of deep-sea food might ascertain 
which market to head for that would be the most 
profitable as to price, in consequence of a scarcity of 
the special kind of fish he had to dispose of. 

It is already in use on the great ocean liners 
Yes, wireless telegraphy, as it becomes more 
perfected and simplified, is bound to be in- 
creasingly employed by all classes of seafarers, 
and in the Navy, and its general installment 
on all classes of freight-carrying merchantmen 
and fishing vessels is only a matter of a short 
time now. That it will tend to greatly pro- 
mote the safety of life afloat is understood by 
none so well as by practical seamen. 



Much ado was recently made by the New- 
York Press over the contemplated arrest by 
the Federal authorities of eleven millionaire 
tile manufacturers for having violated the 
Alien Contract Labor law. But Messrs. Mil- 
lionaires were not arrested. Instead, they were 
deferentially approached by the representa- 
tives of the law and told that they were tech- 
nically under arrest, but would be given ample 
time in which to furnish bail, and they accord- 
ingly bailed themselves "out." It is said that 
they have already engaged very able and very 
learned counsel to defend them and carry the 
case into the Supreme Court of the United 
States, if necessary. Therefore the case is 
likely to be decided inside of a hundred years 
at any rate ! 



The scheme of the boss printers to break 
the strikes of the printers by teaching women 
typewriters how to manipulate typesetting 
machines will furnish a little more "food for 
reflection" for those estimable citizens who are 
worried over the ever-interesting problems of 
"race-suicide" and the "segregation of the 
sexes." But "business" must be pro- 
tected, even although the institution of 
"home" perish from the earth. 



The three principal Italian charitable soci- 
ties in New York have combined for the pur- 
pose of establishing a bureau which will in- 
vestigate all complaints made by Italians and 
all injuries done to Italians anywhere in the 
United States. Special attention will be given 
to relieving the great congestion of Italians 
in New York, by distributing them among the 
rural communities, where work may be found 
for them on the farms. 



Union Items. 



At the regular weekly meeting of the Cen- 
tral Federated Union, of New York, on Sep- 
tember 17, resolutions were read, condemning 
the city officials for having, through negli- 
gence and incompetence, been indirectly re- 
sponsible for the recent elevated railroad dis- 
aster, as well as for the burning of the steam- 
er General Slocum, the collapse of the Darl- 
ington hotel, and the fall of numerous build- 
ings in New York during the last six months, 
with accompanying great loss of life. The 
resolutions were unanimously adopted, and 
copies ordered sent to all affiliated organiza- 
tions, with the request that they be read and 
discussed at the next meeting after their re- 
ceipt. 



Shipping along the Atlantic Coast has been 
quite brisk lately, the demand for seamen hav- 
ing generally been in excess of the supply. 
Freights are fairly good, both in sail and 
steam tonnage. Despite this, Secretary Fraz 
ier, of the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 
takes a gloomy view of the outlook for the 
coming winter, basing his apprehensions upon 
the fact that most of the Eastern seaports 
have stocked up with enough coal to last them 
during many months to come. This has, of 
course, been done in anticipation of the ex- 
pected strike in the anthracite coal fields. As 
an offset to this, however, the coastwise lum- 
ber trade promises to be brisker than usual 
during the coming winter, as there will be a 
large demand in New York and vicinity for 
building and dock materials, including gran- 
ite, paving stones, bricks, cement, lime, sand, 
etc. 



For some weeks past there has been a strike 
in progress among the New York mail wagon 
drivers, backed up by the National Team- 
sters' Association. The parties who had the 
contract for delivering the mails at the va- 
rious ferries and railroad stations made the 
usual claims that the strike was a failure, 
that they had all the men they needed, that 
there was no delay, etc., etc. But so unsat- 
isfactory has their service been to the city that 
the authorities in Washington have been 
forced to take cognizance of the matter, with 
the result that the mail contractors were given 
until midnight of September 30 to bring the 
service up to its usual schedules or have their 
contract voided. In consequence of this de- 
cision of the Government, the union drivers 
have been reinstated at the rate of wages for 
which they struck. 



At the regular weekly meeting of the Cen- 
tral Federated Union, of New York, of Sep 
tember 24, several of the delegates stated that 
European immigrants were regularly smug- 
gled into New York, hundreds at a time, with- 
out having passed through Ellis Island. 
Delegate Sullivan, of the Atlantic Coast Ma- 
rine Firemen's Union, said that the leading 
steamship companies on the Atlantic Coast 
were supplied with crews by crimps, who 
made it a regular business to induce the sea- 
men on foreign vessels to desert, and that in 
this manner alone thousands of aliens were 



(Continued on page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 






Home News. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The army strength in Hawaii is to be 
increased from two companies to a init- 
iation of infantry. 

\V. K. Hearst was nainecl as a candi 

date for Mayor of Greater New Vork at 
a Municipal Ownership mass meeting 

held in that eit v mi ( Ictober 4. 

The Republicans of Massachusi 
Sate convention, at Boston, Mass., on 
October <i. declared for a revision of the 
tariff. 

Cornelius Corcoran, President of the 
Common Council of Milwaukee, Wis., to 

gether with a former Ahlennan and two 

private citizens, have hern indicted l>\ 
the Grand Jury, on charges of grafting. 

Ten men met instant death al th( 

quarrj of tin- Vermont state C pany 

at Gremville, N. V., on ( tctobi i 6, 
about 100 feet of the hank crashed down 
without warning, burying the victims. 

John J). Rockefeller's representative, 
P. T. Gates, has turned over to the Gen- 
eral Education Board the $10,000,000 
Rockefeller promised to give the Board 
on June 30 last for higher education. 

tary of War Tafl arrive, I at 

Washington, l>. ( '., on October i', bi 

big the record from Vokohoma to Wash- 
ington by making the trip in fourteen 

days and arriving two days ahead oi 

schedule time. 

John Temple Graves, editor of the At- 
lanta Daily rTeW8, has made formal an 
nouneement of his candidacy for the 

United states Senate, to suec I Sena- 
tor A. 0. BaCOn, whose term will expire 

in March, 1907. 

The New Vork seel ion of thi 
Democratic party has announced that 
the hit,' Mrs. K. |). Rand, mother-in-law 
of Professor George 1>. Berron, has be- 
queathed $200,000 for the establishment 
of a school of socialism, 

Secretary of War Taft will at the first 
opportunity take up with the President 

the proposition to transfer tin- control 

of the whole matter of the construction 
of the Panama Canal from the War De 
partment to the stale Department. 

The health authorities of Chicago, 
Ills., have begun a rigid investigation of 
the numerous deaths among children in 

South Chicago. It is believed that many 
children have been neglected in order to 
collect insurance. 

In a letter to Assistant Secretary of 
State l.oomis. President Roosevelt do 
elares thai Secretary Hay disagreed 
with him on "even the mild censure" of 
l.oomis in the Taft report, and that Hay 
condemned Bowen in Btrong terms for 

"treachery and disloyalty." 

Genera] Home/.. Liberal candidate foi 
the Presidency of Cuba, in a recent in- 
terview declared that "Liberty is dead 
in Cuba, and the condition of affairs 
there is worse than it ever was under 
Spanish rule, even in the most ferocious 
periods of the Weyler Government." 

At a Cabinet meeting held on October 
li. it was determined that no rhang 

modifications in conflict with instruc- 
tions to United states Consuls contained 

in the circular on Chinese exclusion is- 
sued Several months ago by the Presi- 
dent 's direct ion shall he made. 

The report of Francis A. S. Dodge 

the Paymaster c ueral of the Arm. 

the last fiscal year Shows that the amount 

vings deposited by tlie men was -1. 

531,020, making the total amount since 
the establishment of the savings system 
$26,294,236. 

Mrs. Clarence Markhain. wife of : , 
fanner living twelve miles north of 
Alpha. 111., killed her seven children with 
an ax on September 30, set tire to the 
house in which the bodies lay and then 
cut her own throat, inflicting wounds 
from which she died soon a; 
from the burning building. 



BOYS, READ THIS 



become a property owner and make money by Investing 




see John Anderson, next door to the new postofnee. 

PECK & ANDERSON, San Pedro, Cal. 



BRILLIANTS 

CLOTH I NG STOR E 
SAN PEDRO. CAL. 

We make a Specialty of Handling only the Best Goods Manufactured 
for Seamen. 

YOU WILL FIND THE UNION LABEL ON OUR QOODS ALSO. 



LIPPHAN BROS. 

CLOTHING AND SHOE STORE 

"We Carry- the Finest and Most Up-to-date maKes 
of Union Made Goods 

WIEDWALD BLOCK, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD WINES AND 

LIQUORS. 

BOTTLERS OF SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES BEERS. 

All Roods soid at lowest Ban Francisco pi 
Wc buy direct from Kentucky Distilleries and our California Wineries. 
Seafaring men invited to inspect our stock. 
Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



JOHN HELANDER 

Dealer in 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

Groceries, Provisions, Cigars 

Fourth Street, near Beacon, 
San Fedro, Cal. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO, 



IT. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarter! for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. MUNSON 



Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Fedro, Cal. 

Dealer in 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAX A CALL. 

Front. Street, opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, I'M.. 



CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and all San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



UNION CIGAR AND 
TOBACCO STORE 

ELias WEBERG, Proprietor. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN FEDRO, CAL. 

Union-Made Clgrars, Tobacoos, Pipes, 

Notions, Etc. 



CIGAR AND TOBACCO STORE 

JACOB OLSEN, No. 334, Prop. 



THE BEST CIGARS IN TOWN. 



Store on Fourth Street, near Beacon, 
SAN FEDRO, CAL. 



J. P. SYLVA, Jr. 

Dealer in 

Groceries, Hay and Grain, also Green 

Fruits and Country Produce 

BEACON ST., bet. Fourth and Fifth. 
Phone No. 164. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



FRED SVENDSEN 
UNION i:\press 

AND DRAY CO. 
STAND AT FRONT STREET 

SAN PEDRO, CA1. 



When making purchases from our adver- 
tisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 




SEASIDE MARKET 

CAPTAIN McTICAR and R. L. BAAND 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Beef, Pork, Mutton and Sausages of all Hinds 

M ' t« '■ -i e ted by r. s. Inspector*. 

FRONT STREET, SAN FEDRO. CAL. 
5 ipplled at Lowest 1. 
Telephone 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 
Undertaker and Embalmer 

FOURTH ST. 

Bet. Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 

peoplpsTargain store 

Headquarters for UNION MADE CLOTHING 

Gent Sh P B l i rn » 1 i ln8r GoodB - Bo °t» and 

Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 

Outfits. 

M. LEV if, Propriei 

Ent., Front and Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



UNION 



LABEL 

OF THE 



UNITED HATTERS 



OF N. A. 



L n oo- ffirriS " «»» jf £U„Ks a 10 -oV^ 8 

using them in order o ^t r irt re „, C0 . u , n,erfeI tS- UnprinMn.^ nt>t P? ,ronlze him 
-mpany. of Ph^de^-pa'* ff^^^^^^^^St^^Sl 



LETTERJ.IST. 

SAN PEDRO, CAZ 

Absolonsen . Ole M. Johnson, ,., „, 

Ardellann J Johnson ': 157 « 

Andersen-515 Jordan C 

Andersen, A. B. Juhnky v h 
Andersen. Chas. G. Kahlstr'oii, ' m 

Andersen, Joseph Karlson-8' * 
Andersen. Wilhelm Karlson ( , p 

Andersson-727 Klahn k 

Anderson. Olaf Knutsen,') ut 

Anderson, W. O. Krallman. i frM 

Anderson, Geo Krietsamt p er d 

Anderson. Gust. Krogstad, f.'.'. 

Anderson. S. Ladelane in 

Anderson, W.-991 Lr-utier J -J 

Andreasen, N. 8. I.arsen,' L. . r,. 

An gel beck, G. I.arsson 1 » ' 

Appelgren, John I.avlson I ,r» 

Arkerlund-12G3 Llnd. Aug 

Arntsen. Erik I.indholm.' >.i or 

Aiigustln. A. L. I.ingen, M 

Bakke. John-517 Lund, Cha » sat 

Bllerath, Max I.undgvlst Thn 

Berggren, Gustaf Maatta. Jf 

liergqvlst. J. A. Magnusser 147 

Berntsen. O.-1280 Magnuson 

Blanemo. Oscar Matthew 

Blohle. I.e Henry McAdam! . 
Brandt, Wm.. pkg. McHume. w 

Bratrud. O. M. McKenile. a t 

Bregler. Friedrlch Meyer, En 

Carlson, August Michael, W ter 

Carlson. Fred Mlkkelsen- 

Carlson, Julius Mlkkelsson Alfred 

Carlson, J. -388 MJornes. A > 

Clausen. A. E. Nelson, Fi k 

Rortram. Wm. Nelson, Ju a 

Brandt. William Nielsen, K. . 

t'hamberlin, L. C. Nielsen, M P 

r"heodore, Bodlou Nlelson, N. 
Christensen. Harry Nielsen, N i Chr 
Christiansen, T.udv. Nlsson, Ja is 

chrlstopherson, Nvlund, Jo 

Carl Oerterllng. mil 

I'ornerford, L. Olsen, Erll 26 

Oanielsen, Ernst Olsen, Han 2 

Oaring. C. Olsen, Johi 1. 

D&vey, C. Oraff. D. 

I'lener, Allk Pearson, O ir 

Hills, I. -547 Pedersen-K 

Ed son, Frank Perouwer, < 

Kklund. W. G. Petersen, C la. 

Kdlund. J. A. Petersen, ( 

Rllason. K. A. Pettonen. I H. 

Kngelbright. H. Petterson. el 

Frlkson. Auel A. Plerson. R, irt A. 

Krlandsen-529 Poulsen. 11 '. 

Foldat. John Rasmussen. idolph 

Frandsen. F.-388 Rasmussen Cdw. 

Gibson. Chas. R. Rasmussen, Ictor 

Gronvall. Johan F. Reag, Step l A. 

Orunbock. Johan Redehman-! 

Gunlach, John Reld, Jame 21 

Oustatfson. J.-432 RJetad. 8. 1S5& 

Gustafson, A. F. Rosenblad. irl 

Gustafson. Oskar Rudl, A. " 

Gustavsen. Ben Samslo. 8. 

Hansen. Adolf Samuelsen. 

Hansen, Andrew Sandel. Loi 

Hansen, A. G. Sandon-15T; 

Hansen, August Sanltone. J 

Hansen, Chas. G. Saunders, t 1 

Hansen, H. J. Slmonsen, . red 

Hansen. J. Smith, C. I 

Holtte. John Smith, Pat. 

Hansen, J. P.-1381 Smith, Paul 

Hansen. I.aurlts Smltsh, H. 'f. 
Hansen. Theodoi letter P. < 

Haraldsson-1204 Sodergvlst. to 

Henrlksen. K. Soderlund. drew 

Tsacksnn, G. B, Sorensen. S m 

.Tacobsen, Peder Staef, Lars. 

Jansson, A. -351 Stornes. An 0. 

Jansen. Fred-1281 Strachan, J, i 

Jansson, Edward J. Strand, Edn 

Jensen, Oluf Sunderman. ustav 

.Tanson. Oscar Svenssen. Ii s U. 

Jensen, Niels Olaf Svensson, T> Maui 

.Tens, Otto Swanson, C. 

.Teshke. Hans Swansson. ' 1311 

Johansen, E. H. Thorn. Edm d 

Johansen. E. W. Tomask, Kn . 

Johansen, Geo. W. Verbrugge, 

Johansen, Gunen Verzona. F> 

Johansen, Jorgen Westerholm. .u|\ 

.Tohansen-1591 Wilson, Edvd 

Johansson-12S7 Wilson. P. 

Johansson-1204 Zugehaer, Ac. 



Union Made by Union aids 




V 



INFORMATION WANTE 



George Jordan, a native 
last heard from in August, 
Port Townsend, Wash., is inqi 
by the German Consulate at San ran- 
' 'al. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 









Pacific Coast Marine. 









The Kosmos liner Anubis sailed from Champerieo 
in Oct. 4 for San Francisco direct, and will be due 
it the latter port on October 14. 

The first freight steamer left Vladivostok on Oct. 
1 for Cheefoo, thus reopening regular commerce by 
sea between Vladivostok and other ports. 

The Columbia River Lightship, No. 50, parted from 
her moorings during a heavy gale on Oct. 6 and 
drifted on the beach a little inside Cape Disappoint- 
ment. 

The British schooner El Presidente, built at San 
Francisco for service on the rivers of Colombia, sailed 
I for Tumaco, on Oct. 3, under command of Captain 
' Stohen. 

The steamer St. Paul went ashore at Point Gorda, 
Cal., during a heavy fog on Oct. 7. All hands, in- 
cluding a large number of passengers, were saved. 
The vessel is a total wreck. 

Charles M. Schwab has announced that the Union 
Iron Works, of San Francisco, will shortly be enlarged 
so as to make it the equal in size and capacity of any 
| shipbuilding plant in the country. 

The Oceanic liner Alameda, which went ashore at 
Fort Point, in San Francisco harbor, on Sept. 30, was 
floated on Oct. 6. It is now believed that the vessel 
suffered comparatively little damage. 

The Northern Commercial Company 's steamer, 
Sarah, which left Dawson, N. W. T., on September 19, 
ran aground fifteen miles below Circle City, and was 
still stranded on October 1. 

Commodore William B. Seabury of the Pacific Mail 
Company has resumed command of the liner Korea, 
relieving Captain Adrian Zeeder, who has been in 
command of the Korea for the last two voyages. 

The steamer Buckman, recently purchased on the 
Eastern Coast by the Barneson-Hibberd Company of 
San Francisco, and being brought out by Captain Mil- 
ton Thwing, arrived at St. Lucia on Oct. 3. 

Advices were received at San Francisco, Cal., on Oc- 
tober 1 that the Japanese liner America Maru, Captain 
Going, had sailed from Yokohama for Honolulu and 
San Francisco, and would be due at the latter port on 
October 17. 

The steam-'schooner Brooklyn, bound from Eureka 
with a cargo of lumber, collided with the steam- 
schooner San Gabriel, off Point Arena, Cal., during a 
fog on Oct. 6, and was badly damaged, while the San 
Gabriel escaped with slight injury. 

From the latest reports the Russian cruiser Lena 
will not leave the Mare Island (Cal.) yard for some 
weeks to come. Her flag has not been raised yet, and 
will not be until the peace treaty is fully signed. The 
Lena will then sail for Vladivostok. 

A telegram received at San Francisco on October 5, 
reported that the British ship Bermuda, bound from 
Newcastle, Australia, for Acapuleo, had been towed 
into Acapuleo on the 1st by the German steamer 
Nauplia in a dismasted condition. 

Repairs to the steamer F. A. Kilburn, which went 
ashore outside Coos Bay a few weeks ago, while bound 
from Portland to San Francisco, are nearly completed 
at Boole's shipyard, on Oakland Creek. Upon resum- 
ing service the Kilburn will be stronger than ever be- 
fore. 

The ship Eclipse arrived at Tacoma, Wash., on Oc- 
tober 1, thirty-five days from Shanghai. When but 
two days out the vessel ran into a typhoon that did 
considerable damage and caused the loss of a number 
of sails. Captain Larsen and two seamen were seri- 
ously injured. 

The German fourth-class cruiser Falke, which has 
been on a cruise to the Alaskan coast, returned to San 
Francisco on Oct. 2, and will remain there for the next 
four weeks before proceeding to Central America and 
the Isthmus of Panama, by way of San Pedro, San 
Diego, Mazatlan and other ports. 

Sixty-nine seafaring men have been charged by 
secret service agents at Seattle, Wash., with illegal 
naturalization, who previously secured papers in San 
Francisco which were revoked after an investigation. 
The naturalization frauds in the North, it is stated, 
will exceed in seriousness the conditions unearthed 
at San Francisco. 

The largest cargo of salmon of the year from 
Alaska was brought to San Francisco on October 5 
by the ship W. H. Macy. It consisted of 84,000 cases. 
The same vessel last year brought the record cargo 
that season, amounting to 86,000 cases. The year's 
catch is now practically at hand and is being dis- 
tributed and trans-shipped in a lively manner. 

The steamer City of Topeka, under command of 
Captain Paulsen, sailed from San Francisco on Oct. 7, 
for Ensenada and all the Mexican ports usually visited 
by the Curacao. The Curacao, now laid up, was ex- 
pected to be ready for service last week, but will not be 
able to resume service for some weeks, and the City of 
Topeka will make the trip in her place, manned by 
the Curacao 's crew. 

The new steamer Bessie Dollar, built at Port Glas- 
gow for the Robert Dollar Steamship Company of San 
Francisco, has probably been already launched from 
the builders' yards. Captain Gow, late of the Hazel 
Dollar, also a new steamer built at Port Glasgow, is 
to have command of the Bessie Dollar, which is a 
modern freighter with a particularly large capacity 
for lumber. 

Sailing vessels now due at San Francisco include 
the British ship Wayfarer, out 157 days from Ham- 
burg; the British ship Bardowie, 235 days out from 
Newcastle, England, and which on July 16 put into 
Cape Town with her bulwarks stove and stanchions 
damaged. The Bardowie discharged 600 tons of coke 
at Cape Town and sailed again on her passage on Au- 



gust 21. The French ship Duchesse de Berry, 177 
days out from Swansea, is also due. 

The American bark Homeward Bound sailed from 
San Francisco on October 1, in tow of the tugboat 
Sea Rover, for Eureka, where she will take on a par- 
tial cargo of lumber for Sydney or Melbourne. She is 
to return to the former port to complete her cargo be- 
fore sailing for Australia. The British bark Inver- 
snaid, to carry merchandise to Sydney, was also towed 
out for Eureka, but, like the Homeward Bound, will 
return to San Francisco to finish loading. 

Captain Abner Zeeder of the Pacific Mail liner 
Korea, whose citizenship rights have been under in- 
vestigation by Secret Service Agent Helms, was re- 
instated to citizenship by Judge Murasky, at San 
Francisco on Oct. 6, to whom Agent Helms had re- 
ferred to the captain's papers. First Mate Leopold 
Quayle of the City of Sydney, was also rehabilitated 
as a bona fide citizen of the United States by Judge 
Murasky on the same day. 

The overdue British bark Lalla Rookh reached her 
destination, Falmouth, on Oct. 6, after a long pas- 
sage of 199 days from Brisbane, Australia. For weeks 
the Lalla Rookh has been on the overdue board, for 
some time past at a rate of 90 per cent for reinsur- 
ance, which is usually regarded as the limit. Another 
overdue arriving on the same day was the British ship 
Deanmount, eighty-eight days out from Newcastle, 
Australia, for Valparaiso, and quoted at 15 per cent. 

The United States Circuit Court of Appeals handed 
down a deeison at San Francisco on Oct. 2, in the 
case of the Oceanic Steamship Company against the 
Government in favor of the action of Collector of the 
Port Stratton, who collected $2 per head from the 
steamship company for 210 alien passengers who went 
through this country. The opinion was written by 
Judge Hawley, Judge Ross concurring; but Presiding 
Judge Gilbert entered a very positive dissenting opin- 
ion. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at San 
Francisco on October 8: French bark Ville de Mnl- 
house, ]20 days from Port Pirie for Antwerp, 6 per 
cent. Wulfran Puget, 125 days from Shields for Val- 
paraiso, 10 per cent. British bark Renfield, 12L! days 
from London for Fremantle, 5 per cent. Italian bark 
Affezione, 110 days from Bahia Blanca for Stockton, 
England, 15 per cent. British bark Principality, 158 
days from Junin for Rotterdam, 90 per cent. British 
bark Celticburn, 139 days from Port Pirie for Ant- 
werp, 10 per cent. German bark Edmund, 137 days 
from Port Talbot for Iquique, 35 per cent. 

Further details of the burning of the American ship 
Roanoke on August 10 in Noumea, New Caledonia, 
have been received. The ship was loading a full cargo 
of chrome ore, when fire was discovered in the forward 
hold. In spite of all that the crew of thirty-two men, 
and the crews of the American ship Susquehanna and 
the Norwegian bark Arabia, could do, the fire got be- 
yond control, and all hands were driven over the side 
into small boats, and from a distance they witnessed 
the total destruction of the ship. The mate of the 
Susquehanna, who had the led the fight against the 
fire, was almost overcome, and was helpless for some 
hours afterward. Captain Amesbury of the Roanoke 
is now en route to New York. 



DIED. 



John Axel Anderson, No. 729, a native of Sweden, 
aged 44, died at San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 7, 1905. 

John Anderson, No. 756, a native of Finland, aged 
46, drowned in Chignik Bay, Alaska, June 10, 1905. 

Harry Hansen, No. 1476, a native of Norway, aged 
26, drowned at Aberdeen, Wash., Oct. 3, 1905. 

Andreas Heggland, No. 195, a native of Finland, 
aged 29, drowned in Chignik Bay, Alaska, May 3, 
1905. 

Harrold Syoersen, No. 130, a native of Norway, 
aged 37, died at Port Townsend, Wash., Sept. 27, 
1905. 



HOW'S THIS? 



We offer One Hundred Dollars Reward for any case 
of Catarrh that cannot be cured by Hall's Catarrh 
Cure. F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, O. 

We, the undersigned, have known F. J. Cheney for 
the last 15 years, and believe him perfectly honorable 
in all business transactions, and financially able to 
carry out any obligations made by his firm. 

Walding, Kinnan & Marvin, 
Wholesale Druggists, Toledo, O. 

Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken internally, acting di- 
rectly upon the blood and mucous surfaces of the sys- 
tem. Testimonials sent free. Price, 75c. per bottle. 
Sold by all Druggists. 

Take Hall 's Family Pills for constipation. 



F. R. Wall, who was for many years an officer in 
the United States Navy, is now practicing marine law 
in San Francisco. He gives claims of all seafarers 
careful attention. Merchants' Exchange building, 
California street, near Montgomery; rooms 208-209 
Phone Bush 508. 



Bagley's Sun-Cured is now packed in pouches and 
the fronts will be received assorted with labels from 
the foil packages, for premiums. 



Dyers' StriRe in Saxony. 



United States Consul, Ernest L. Harris, of 
Chemnitz, reports that the dyers' strike in 
Saxony, which had its origin in Glauchau- 
Meerane, and which threatened at one time 
to assume enormous dimensions, has come to 
a sudden end. He writes : 

The great strike at Crimmitschau during 
the winter of 1903-4 is still keenly remem- 
bered by everybody in this part of Saxony. 
At that time 8,000 skilled and organized 
workmen held out for six months. The fac- 
tory owners finally won the day, but the in- 
dustries of Crimmitschau suffered to such an 
extent that they will not regain their former 
prosperity for many years to come. After 
the strike was over the factories were only 
able to take back a small percentage of their 
old workmen for the reason that all outstand- 
ing orders had been canceled, and in the mean- 
time a sharp competition sprung up in other 
parts of Germany. 

In the present crisis there is no question 
but what both employer and employe 
throughout all the textile centers in Saxony 
and Thuringia were anxious to localize and 
settle the points of difference before the strike 
spread from Glauchau-Meerane to Gera and 
other places in Thuringia. The number of 
workmen on strike in Glauchau-Meerane was 
11,000, and if it had assumed greater dimen- 
sions fully 40,000 men would have been forced 
to quit work. The reason for this is to be 
found in the action of the Gera manufacturers 
who, by previous arrangement, had agreed to 
work in union with the factory owners of 
Glauchau-Meerane. By closing down their 
factories the pressure of their united efforts 
would be brought to bear, not only upon the 
strikers at Glauchau-Meerane, but upon organ- 
ized labor in general. 

On August 12 the dyers and their employ- 
ers in Glauchau-Meerane, each making cer- 
tain concessions, finally agreed upon a scale 
of wages and declared the strike off, the same 
having lasted about three weeks. The mini- 
mum weekly wages agreed upon is $3.50 for 
men and $2.15 for women. 



Canadian Merchant Marine. 



According to the annual report of the 
Dominion Department of Marine and Fish- 
eries recently published, the number of vessels 
recorded in the Dominion on December 31, 
including old and new vessels, sailing vessels, 
steamers, and barges, was 7,152, measuring 
672,838 tons registered tonnage — an increase 
of 132 vessels and a decrease of 10,309 tons 
register compared with 1903. Assuming the 
average value to be $30 per ton, the value of 
the registered tonnage of Canada on Decem- 
ber 31, 1904, would be $20,185,140. The num- 
ber of new vessels built and registered in 
1904 was 308, measuring 18,554 tons. Esti- 
mating the value of the new tonnage at $45 
per ton, there would be a total value of 
$834,930 for new vessels. Of the total number 
of sailing ships and steamers, Nova Scotia 
has 2,066, Ontario 1,886, and Quebec 1,287. 
The number of steamers is 2,543, with a gross 
tonnage of 353,514 tons. Ontario has 1,288 
of the steamers, or more than half. 



The importation of paints, inks, and colors 
into Chile average about $800,000 annually in 
value. Germany and Great Britain are the 
chief supply sources, the United States par- 
ticipating only to the amount of $31,500 in the 
importation of these articles during 1905. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 
-JOURNAL^ 



Published Weekly by 

THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established In 1887 



W. MACARTHUR.... Editor | P. SCHARRENBERG, Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail. - $2.00 | Six months, $1.00 

Single copies, 10 cents each. 
Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Satur- 
day noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
southwest corner East and Mission streets, San 
Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, 



- OCTOBER 11, 1905. 



SAX FRANCISCO A FREE PORT. 



The Oakland (Cal.) Longshoremen's Union 

(formerly known as "No. 225. I. L. M. ;m<l 
T. A.") decided on last Thursday to with- 
draw from the long-name outfit, and will 
henceforth be known as the "Lumber Han- 
dlers' Union of California." This action re- 
moves the last trace of long-nameism in the 
harbor of San Francisco. The latter is now 
a free port, free from the claims, pretensions 
and dangers of "industrialism." as repre- 
sented by the so-called "International Long- 
shoremen, Marine and Transport Workers' 
Association." 

The action of the Oakland longshoremen, 
besides being creditable to their intelligence, 
will redound to their material benefit, since 
they are now assured of the whole-hearted 
support of their fellow-workers in other era Its. 
The Sailors, for instance, who have felt that 
any support, or even recognition, granted to 
the long-namemen was so much aid and com- 
fort extended to the enemy, are now free to 
lend a helping hand, secure in the knowledge 
that the power thus created will not be used 
against themselves. 

The position taken by the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific in its dealings with the long- 
shoremen on the Pacific Coast, namely, that 
the actual support, or non-support, of the 
Sailors is a matter of more concern to the 
longshoremen than the nominal support or 
opposition of the "I. L. M. and T. A.." lias 
been amply justified by results. Wherever 
the longshoremen have acceded to the requests 
of the Sailors the benefits to the former have 
been immediate and important. The two most 
recent instances of this fact are contained in 
the cases of the Union Lumber Company and 
the Hooper Lumber Company, both of San 
Francisco. These concerns have for a long 
time been running their yards on a non-union 
basis. As soon as the Longshore Lumbermen 
determined to join hands with the Sailors, 
steps were taken jointly to unionize these 
yards. The outcome has been a complete suc- 
cess. The efforts which, when undertaken 
singly or separately, had proved abortive. 



were crowned with success immediately the 
Sailors and Lumbermen joined hands in com- 
mon cause. The Union and Hooper yards are 
now thoroughly union establishments. Lastly, 
but not leastly, many employes of the latter 
concern secured an increase of wages of +1 
per day (i. e., from $3 to $4) immediately 
upon the completion of the agreement. 

These and all similar results have been se- 
cured solely by co-operation between seamen 
and longshoremen; they can only be main- 
tained by a continuance of that method. 
Those who, through misinformation, are dis- 
posed to criticise the attitude of the organized 
seamen toward the "I. L. M. and T. A." are 
invited to reflect upon the facts. Longname- 
ism sounds well, no doubt;- but trade-union- 
ism alone produces results in the hour of su- 
preme test. 



WRECKS (>X THE COAST. 



The wreck of the Oceanic liner Alameda, 

noted in these columns last week, has turned 
out to be no wreck at all. The old girl just 
wanted a rest, and, having taken one for a 
week, she floated off the rocks so quietly and 
quickly that the wreckers had scarce time to 
get their mouths into shape for a big holler 
over their own achievement, which consisted 
mainly in a lot of tall talk about what they 
were going to do. The Alameda, like the pa- 
tient who hears the doctors discuss his case. 
determined to fool the wise ones, so she gol 
up and left them still discussing the proposed 
operation. The small sum of $60,000 will 
again put the handsome ship in good shape, 
and the Alameda's luck will henceforth shine 
with added luster. 

The series of wrecks that has occurred on 
the Coast within the past few weeks is re- 
markable for two things, namely, for the lack 
of fatalities in any case, and for the abun- 
dance of newspaper wisdom that has been de- 
veloped in the course of the discussion on the 
subject. The more important of the recent 
strandings on the Coast include the steamers 
Tricolor, Gypsy, Alameda, Santa Barbara and 
St. Paul. Of these the Tricolor, Gypsy and 
St. Paul ai*e total wrecks. In each ease fog 
prevailed at the time of the accident, and 
that fact is attributed by seamen as the main 
cause of the trouble. The newspapers, how- 
ever, are disposed to scout the fog theory, the 
fact that the seamen favor that theory being 
against rather than in favor of its acceptance 
by the newspapers, since seamen are notori- 
ously unreliable in such matters! The news- 
papers have a theory of their own, to wit, 
that these vessels were too close to the land 
when they went ashore ! Could anything be 
more conclusive? When a vessel goes ashore, 
it is because she was too close to land ; when 
a vessel founders at sea, it is because she got 
full of water! The profundity of these theo- 
ries is only equalled by their simplicity, a 
feature which, by the way, is but another evi- 
dence of the genius that inspires them. 

The newspapers, not content with merely 
telling us the cause of the recent wrecks on 
the Coast, have proposed a remedy, which is 
that ships shall be so constructed that they 
can travel on land as well as on water, all the 
same "liiit der ears across." 'Tis a splendid 
idea, one that gathers sanctity with each cen- 
tury that passes since it was first born to the 
world. The suggestion lacks but one thing to 
make it perfect, the amphibious ship must lie 
commanded by a navigator of commensurate 



abilities. The inference is plain, of course; 
we must have a newspaper editor in the ca- 
pacity of boss buttons. Presumably the edi- 
tors have allowed their modesty to deter them 
from making this obvious suggestion, for once 
assuming that the intelligence of their readers 
would see the point. By all means let us has- 
ten the advent of the ship that can cut off 
corners when need be, and let her be com- 
manded by the editor, who, by reason of the 
fact that he is always in deep water and al- 
ways in a fog, is eminently qualified to steer 
his craft amid these dangers without striking 
any tiling except an occasional happy thought. 



The loss of the freight-steamer Sevona and 
seven lives in the recent storm on Lake Supe- 
rior forcibly illustrates the lax system of life- 
saving equipment on board that class of ves- 
sels. The Sevona had on board a number of 
female passengers. In order that the women 
might be saved part of the crew had to remain 
on board, the boats available being insufficient 
to curry all hands. Those who remained on 
board were drowned. "Women and children 
lirsf !" is good principle, of course; but when 
in practice that principle is translated into 
"Women and children only!" the ethics of 
chivalry are somewhat strained. The Sevona 
case is made the more noteworthy by the fact 
that quite recently a delegation of Lake ves- 
selowners protested to the Washington au- 
thorities against the application of the new 
Steamboat Inspection laws to freighters which 
carry passengers only upon occasion— that is, 
upon every occasion possible. It would ap- 
pear from the Sevona case that the protest in 
question has been successful; also it would 
appear that the said protest was unwarranted 
by the conditions. Perhaps we oughl not be 
too critical. Perhaps, if an occasional small 
sacrifice, say of seven lives or so, be not made 
to the principle of "Women and children 
first!" the same wiil fall into innocuous 
desuetude, in which event the "romance of 
the sea" will be robbed of its main-stay. 
Perhaps the owners of the Sevona are entitled 
to credit, rather than blame, for their part in 
the maintenance of a "splendid tradition!" 



The article by Tom Lauder, on page 1 of 
this issue, is an interesting and timely dis- 
cussion of a great institution. Long and inti- 
mate acquaintance with the labor press of 
Australia impels the Journal to indorse all 
that our correspondent says regarding the 
ability and power of our contemporaries in 
the Antipodes. Mr. Lauder makes no mention 
of the labor press of New South Wales, his 
intention being to further discuss the subject, 
as it appears in that and other parts of Aus- 
tralasia, in a subsequent article. Meanwhile, 
we note the "special, double, moving-in num- 
ber" just issued by the Worker, of Sydney. 
N. S. W. The occasion of our esteemed eon- 
temporary's "showing off" is the opening of 
its own building in Sydney, a fine illustration 
of which appears on the front page of the 
issue. The Worker was first published in 
1891 and has since continued to grow in in- 
fluence among the Australian trade-unionists. 
We congratulate the Worker and wish it 
many years of added prosperity and power 
for good. 

The government of industrial conditions by 
the women of the households, exercised 
through the medium of the union label, is the 
kind of "petticoat government" that every 
man may welcome with pride and pleasure. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A special agent of the Department of Com- 
merce and Labor reports that "Japan wants 
the United States to enact legislation discour- 
aging Japanese immigration to the United 
States." The same authority adds that Japan 
will protest against any act on the part of this 
country "which would look like discrimina- 
tion or which would reflect on Japan's dig- 
nity." It appears from this report that 
Japan's future peace of mind depends mainly 
upon one thing. The United States will doubt- 
less be able to accommodate Japan in the mat- 
ter of "discouraging" the immigration of her 
coolies, but whether our measures of discour- 
agement will, or will not, "reflect upon Ja- 
pan's dignity" will depend upon the length 
of the lugs which that nation proposes to 
put on. 



The "Workers' Magazine," now going the 
rounds of the press as a feature of the "Sun- 
day supplement," is an imposition upon the 
reading public. Under the pretense of giving 
the average reader a glimpse of the field oc- 
cupied by the labor press, the "Workers' 
Magazine" dishes up a lot of twaddle about 
the evils of "looking at the clock" and the 
virtues of "making the bosses' business your 
own." The stuff is anti-union throughout 
and should be frowned upon by the labor 
press, instead of being advertised by that me- 
dium — at so much per insertion. Altogether, 
the "Workers' Magazine" is a fitting climax 
to the atrocities perpetrated by the Sunday 
press, as silly as "Happy Hooligan," but not 
half as funny. 



The reference in our "Australian Notes" 
(published on page 2 of this issue) to the use 
of this paper by the Australian opponents of 
the union label applies particularly to the 
publication of the "We Don't Patronize" list. 
The Australian Parry-Postites object to that, 
as an infringement upon their sacred right to 
"run their own business." However, it is 
more than likely that the union label will re- 
ceive legislative approval by the Australian 
Parliament, in which event the Journal will 
be entitled to congratulate itself upon its part 
in popularizing the label among the Austra- 
lian workers. 



Those missionaries who recently voted to 
put a stop to the discussion of "tainted 
money" may flatter themselves upon having 
got rid of a very delicate subject. But the 
discussion will continue, just the same. In- 
deed, the missionaries will be very fortunate 
if they do not find themselves discussed as an 
element of the "taint." A question of the 
kind under consideration may be fought out, 
but it can't be cried out. 



Attention is directed to the call for the con- 
vention of the International Seamen's Union 
of America, published in another column. 
Locals of that organization should determine 
to be fully represented upon the occasion, 
which will doubtless mark an important epoch 
in the work of organization among the Amer- 
ican seafaring craft. 



When does the "taint" leave the money? 
When the latter is paid in the shape of fair 
remuneration for honest labor. And not a 
minute sooner! 



When buying cigars see that the blue label 
of the Cigarmakers' International Union is 
on the box from which you are served ! 



Seamen's Convention Call. 



International Seamen's Union 
op America, 
Boston, Mass., October 3, 1905. 

To Affiliated Unions: Greeting — Pursuant 
to the constitution of the International Sea- 
men's Union of America, you are hereby no- 
tified that the Eleventh Annual Convention 
of the I. S. U. of A. will be called to order on 
Monday, December 4, 1905, at ten a. m. in the 
port of Cleveland, Ohio. 

The eleventh convention of the I. S. U. of 
A. will be one of the most important conven- 
tions that has ever been held, as questions of 
great moment to the seamen of this country 
will have to be dealt with; and in order that 
they may be dealt with wisely, it is very im- 
portant that every organization should send 
as many delegates as is possible, and to send 
the best and the most capable men. Don't 
let favoritism or popularity guide you in your 
selection, but send men who are capable and 
well informed as to the needs and conditions 
of the seamen of this country, organized and 
unorganized. 

representation. 

Representation will be: One delegate for 
two hundred or more members; three dele- 
gates for five hundred or more members, and 
one delegate for each additional five hundred 
members, or majority fraction thereof. 

Delegates shall be elected by a general vote 
of the organizations they represent. 

Delegates are not entitled to seats unless 
their organization has paid per capita tax in 
full for the quarter ending September 30. 

Hotel accommodations can be had as fol- 
lows: 

Hotel Saunders $1.25— $1.50 per day 

New Commercial $1.25 — $1.50 per day 

American House $2.50 per day up 

Kernard $2.50 per day up 

Headquarters will be established at the 
Hotel Saunders. 

Yours fraternally, 

Wm. II . Frazier, 
Secretary-Treasurer, I. S. U. A. 

ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Sept. 28, 1905. 
Shipping fair. 

Wm. H. Frazier, Secretary. 
1%A Lewis st. 

ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION . 

Headquarters, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 27, 1905. 
Shipping slack; quite a few men ashore. Branches 
meeting with fair success. 

Daniel Sullivan, Secretary. 
15 Union st. 

FISHERMEN'S PROTECTIVE" UNION OF 
THE PACIFIC COAST AND ALASKA. 

Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 6, 1905. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 8:00 
p. m., P. Ahlsteadt presiding. Secretary reported the 
fishing in Alaska during last season, good, with the 
exception of Igagik, TJgashik, Karluk and Alitak, and 
that the men seemed fairly well satisfied, as far as 
the fishing is concerned, but that there is among all 
the fishermen a general dissatisfaction with the 
articles they signed for the different companies. 
A Quarterly Finance Committee was elected. Dele- 
gates to the International Seamen's Union conven 
tion, at Cleveland, O., were nominated. The election 
to be held in the two next regular meetings. It was 
decided that two delegates be sent. Resolutions favor- 
ing the action taken by I. S. U. of A. in relation to 
the trouble between the aforesaid I. S. U. of A. and 
the so-called "I. L. M. and T. A." were unanimously 
adopted. Resolutions instructing and authorizing the 
Secretary to use all efforts in getting a Government 
Hospital erected at Bristol Bay, Alaska, were unani- 
mously adopted. Resolutions favoring amending the 
articles heretofore signed by the fishermen were 
unanimously adopted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

I. N. Hylen, Secretary. 

9 Mission st. 



V 


OFFICIAL. 


* 



b 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 9, 1905. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 7:30 
p. in., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping fair. The Quarterly Finance Committee re- 
ported having found books, bills and cash on hand and 
in banks correct. A communication was received from 
the Oakland Longshoremen 's Union, stating that they 
had unanimously voted in favor of returning their 
charter to the so-called "I. L., M. & T. A. " The Ship- 
wreck Benefit was ordered paid to ten members of the 
crew of the wrecked steamer St. Paul; three members 
of the steamer Gipsy, and one member of the ship 
Foyledale. 

A. Furuseth, Secretary. 

S. W. cor. East and Mission sts. Tel. Main 5397. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 2, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Men still scarce. 

H. L. Petterson, Agent. 
3004 McCarver st. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 2, 1905. 
Shipping fair. 

P. B. Gill, Agent. 
1312 Western ave. P. O. Box 48. Tel. James 3031. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 2, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping and general 
situation unchanged. 

Wm. Thorbeck, Agent. 
114 Quincy st. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 443. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 2, 1905. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

Wm. Gohl, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland (Or.) Agency, Oct. 3, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping slack; few men 
ashore. 

D. W. Paul, Agent . 
40 Union ave. Tel. Hood 352. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 2, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping good; prospects 
fair. 

C. Sorensen, Agent. 
222 C street. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 566. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 2, 1905. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

Harry Ohlsen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 774. 



Honolulu (H. T.) Agency, Sept. 25, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium; pros- 
pects poor. 

A. Coldin, Agent. 
P. O. Box 96. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' AS- 
SOCIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 5, 1905. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 7:30 
p. m., W. Sorensen in the chair. Secretary reported 
shipping fair. The resignation of the agent, H. J. 
Rothschild, in Seattle, was accepted and W. Sorenson 
elected for the unexpired term. Nominations for 
delegates to the International Seamen's Union con- 
vention were proceeded with. Shipwreck Benefit 
was ordered to be paid to the crew of the steamer 
Santa Barbara. M. Naughton, shipwrecked on the 
schooner Muriel in San Pedro was allowed the full 
benefit. A Quarterly Finance Committee was elect cm I. 
Eugene Steidle, Secretary. 

54 Mission st. 



Seattle (Wash.) Agency, Sept. 28, 1905. 
Shipping quiet; not many men idle. 

H. J. Rothschild, Agent. 

San Pedro (Cal.) Agency, Sept 38, 1905. 
Shipping fair; prospects good. 

G. Lloyd, Agent. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, III., Oct. 2, 1905. 
Shipping rather slow. It was decided to send the 
full quota of delegates to the eleventh animal conven- 
tion of the International Seamen's Union of America. 
V. A. Olander, Asst. Secretary. 
123 North Desplaines st. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS OF THE 
GREAT LAKES. 



Headquaktkks, Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 26, 1905. 
Situation unchanged. 

H. R. Walker, Secretary. 
55 Main st. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



V?-T-V. 



I^w^^^w^J^iii^^^^^i^^M^^^^^^ 



On the Great Lakes. 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 

* • » i I i 



«' «^<?»3><»><frS><3x»><Sx3><3xa>^<SKi^^ 




Plain Dealer, Double Dealer. 



DULUTH, Sept. 29.— A real mutiny, minus the 
blood and thunder accompaniments of the Clark Rus- 
sell novels, took place on the barge Matanzas last 
night. Tnstead of demanding more grog and plum 
duff, all the crew of the Matanzas wanted was a tew- 
more inches of canvas on the hatch covers, which they 
claimed were not of sufficient length for safety. 
The barge, which was bowling down Lake Superior 
in tow of the steamer Shenandoah at the time of the 
uprising, was brought back to port. Upon reaching 
shore a representative of the Seamen's Union investi- 
gated the case and upheld the sailors. New hatch cov- 
ers were then provided and the two vessels resumed 
their voyage this afternoon. The boats belong to Cap- 
tain .lames Davidson, of Bay City. 

The foregoing appeared in the Cleveland 
Plain Dealer under date of September 30, 
and shows the opinion of that paper on sail- 
ors and seafaring men in general. I must ad- 
mit that that paper is not alone in its hatred of 
seamen, but few persons, and even fewer news- 
papers, vent their spleen so openly. "A 
real mutiny, minus the blood and thund- 
er accompaniments of Clark Russell nov- 
els," is good. We all know that the 
men, according to the landsman's idea. 
should have made the trip. If the 
weather held good, and the barge got safely 
through, then all right, If a blow came up, 
and seas began to break over her and because 
of insufficient hatch cloths, she leaked water 
into her hold and finally went the way of the 
old Pretoria, then all the sympathy would be 
due her owners! But no sympathy for the 
crew from the Plain Dealer at this time of 
the season, when old Superior has her war 
paint on. 

The owners should be compelled by 
law to furnish adequate protection for their 
crews. I am well aware that there are several 
old tubs which would be better at the bottom 
of the Lake, but I do not know any seamen who 
want to go with them. The chances are good 
that the crew of the Mantanzas were in the 
right, else they would not have been upheld 
by their agent. Neither would Captain Gordon 
have submitted to their demands. But I am 
not going into the right and wrong of the 
thing, for I only have the Plain Dealer's art- 
icle to go by. But the gross injustice toward 
seamen in general is what I dislike. "Every- 
thing for the owner, let the sailor drown, ' ' ap- 
pears to be the motto of the Plain Dealer. The 
brave men who gave their lives to the Sevona, 
that her passengers might be saved, have ap- 
parently died in vain. Not one word of credit 
have they received, and before the snow falls 
their very names will cease to be a memory to 
all except their comrades and the dear ones 
left behind. I note in a current newspaper — 
the Plain Dealer, of course — that the owners 
are very much exercised over the order for an- 
other inspection of their vessels. If they are 
safe and in good condition, why do the owners 
object to their being inspected ? 

A local newspaper, of date September 29, 
had a scare-head article of news : "A Drunk- 
en Sailor Saved." A switchman had found 
some man asleep near the railroad tracks and 
awakened him. There was nothing to show 
that he was a sailor, except that he was drunk ! 
Do you wonder? W. H. J. 

Conneaut, 0. 



Tbe Dead of tbe Iosco. 



With the discovery of two additional 
bodies the remains of fifteen persons who per- 
ished in the wreck of the steamer Iosco and 
her consort, the schooner Olive Jeanette, have 
now been recovered. Of these, eight have 
been picked up along the beach in the vicin- 
ity of the Huron Mountain club and the oth- 
ers in the neighborhood of L'Anse. One body 
found on September 14 was that of a man 
who wore silk underwear, although his trous- 
ers were of the blue jean variety and his 
shoes of the common sort. On the corpse was 
found $152 in currency in a large pocketbook 
which was attached to a belt securely fastened 
about his waist. There were no papers or 
marks of identification. A description of the 
corpse follows: Height, 5 feet, 6 inches; 
weight, 140 pounds; smooth face; eye tooth 
crowned with gold. 

There is considerable wreckage scattered 
along the beach near Huron Mountain for a 
distance of thirty miles. It consists princi- 
pally of cabin furniture and parts of the up- 
per works of the Iosco. An oak railing 
twenty feet long, mattresses, bed springs, 
leather couches and chairs are among the ar- 
ticles found, and there is much of the same 
kind of debris on the shores of Huron islands. 
The searching party found a child's toy, a 
wooden soldier painted black and white, with 
the appearance of having been fashioned with 
a jack-knife. The impression prevails that a 
child is among the missing, as a quantity of 
doll's clothing was washed up with the wreck- 
age. 

It is planned to maintain the beach patrol 
until the dozen or more missing bodies are re- 
covered, although Captain Smith, representa- 
tive of Hawgood & Company, of Cleveland, 
owners of the lost craft, says that it is prob- 
able that some of the bodies will never be 
found. Most of the bodies have been taken to 
the receiving vault in Park cemetery for stor- 
age. All have been numbered, and the coroner 
has a description of each. The remains of the 
one woman found have not been identified. 
It was supposed they were those of Mrs. W. 
B. Barnes, wife of the cook, herself assistant 
steward of the Iosco, but later information is 
that with her husband she left the boat before 
the latter sailed on her ill-fated trip. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



Henry Hess, of Buffalo, chief-engineer of 
the Western Transit Company, has resigned his 
position at the age of seventy, having been 
with the company since 1856. He gained 
rapid promotion in the service and in 1865 he 
was made first-engineer of the steamer Mo- 
hawk, after which he handled the machinery 
on nearly all of the company's fleet, having 
been in the Commodore, Fountain City, Al- 
bany, Hudson, Troy, Buffalo, Chicago and 
Utica, and at the time of his retirement was in 
the Superior. He has never missed a trip. 



The steamer H. C. Frick, last of the "Big 
Four" built this year for the Steel Trust, sail- 
ed from Bay City on September 25, on her 
first trip, clearing for Duluth. While going 
from the shipyard to the fueling dock the new 
boat bumped into the Michigan Central bridge, 
cracking the cement pier and displacing one 
span several inches. 



New Coal DocK. 



President Francis L. Robbins, of the Pitts- 
burg Coal Company, has issued instructions 
to go ahead with the construction of a $100,- 
000-coal dock at Point aux Frenes, near the 
Soo. The dock will be used for fueling ves- 
sels passing in the St. Mary's River, and will 
provide competition for the Cleveland coal 
men. The Pittsburg Coal Company will now 
be enabled to obtain the fuel business of the 
Pittsburg Steamship Company, which amounts 
to about $100,000 a year. 

While the Pittsburg Coal Company has been 
supplying the steamship company's furnaces 
with coal, the Cleveland coal men have been 
furnishing most of the fuel for its vessels. The 
location of the new dock is said to be especi- 
ally advantageous for vessels. Officials of the 
Steel Trust fleet have been asked to formally 
approve of the location, and it is said that 
President and General Manager Coulby, who 
is now at the head of the Lakes looking after 
the steamer Maritana, which is in bad shape at 
Detour, would extend his trip to the Soo. As- 
sistant Manager Harvey and Superintendent 
Smith are also at Detour, and the matter may 
be decided upon while these three officers are 
in the upper Lakes vicinity. 



Who Will Settle? 



Who is to pay for the $20,000 worth of hard- 
ware and groceries which lighter No. 3 of the 
Merchants' Lighterage Co. dumped into the 
Chicago River four weeks ago has become a 
great question among the fifty people to 
whom it was being sent and the wholesale 
firms which shipped it. 

The Lighterage Company has applied to the 
Federal courts to limit its liability to the value 
of the lighter, as it lies at the bottom of the 
river. As that is worth nothing, and will be 
blown up by the Government engineer as an 
obstruction to navigation, the Lighterage 
Company escapes. Some of the shippers se- 
cured bills of lading from the railroad com- 
panies for goods now on their way down the 
drainage canal to the Mississippi, and the rail- 
roads say these are not holding. The firms 
which shipped the goods state that they did 
not insure against marine risks, and the peo- 
ple who bought the goods allow they knew 
nothing about any marine risk, as they sup- 
posed the consignments were to come by rail. 

Out of the question involved will come some 
important decisions regarding the new system 
of shippin«~goods by lighters on the Lakes. 

The schooner Senator was caught' in a storm 
near Poverty Islands, Lake* Michigan, recently 
and rolled her masts overboard. The crew 
were taken off the wreck by the tug Smith and 
landed at Mackinac Island. The derelict was 
picked up by Ann Arbor No. 3 and towed into 
Frankfort. The masts and rigging are en- 
tirely gone, and there were twelve inches of 
water in the hold. 



The new steamer Peter White took out 8,830 
gross tons of hard hematite iron ore from 
Marquette for Buffalo as her maiden cargo. 



The total number of deaths from yellow- 
fever at New Orleans up to date was 41f). 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Marine Notes. 



The new 500-footer, building at Craig's, at 
Toledo, will be named in honor of Eugene Zim- 
merman, of Cincinnati, president of the C. H. 
& D. — Pere Marquette Railroad System. 

The D. & C. line has chartered the steamer 
Arabia, owned by M. Calvin, of Buffalo, for 
several trips from Cleveland to Detroit, to 
bring up accumulation of iron commodities. 

A fine of $200 has been placed on the steam- 
er Mariposa, of the Steel Trust fleet, for viola- 
tion of navigation rules in the St. Mary's 
River. She is charged with passing the steam- 
er Bessemer at Johnson's Point. 

The new lighthouse tender Aspen, being 
built for the Eleventh District at Craig's yard, 
was launched recently. The boat is to be de- 
livered to the Government not later than No- 
vember 22. 

Harry Molyneau obtained possession recent- 
ly of his yacht Hazel M., which was seized a 
month ago at Sandusky by the revenue-cutter 
Morrill, for sailing at night without a license. 
The fine was reduced from $200 to $10 and was 
paid. 

The schooner West Side, which reached St. 
Clair River on September 25, leaking badly, 
stopped at Detroit on the 27th and lightered 
100,000 feet of lumber. She then proceeded 
for Cleveland with extra men on board to 
work the pumps. 

The Richelieu & Ontario Navigation Com- 
pany had the biggest season's business in its 
history, with $250,000 increase over last season 
Eight per cent will be earned on the capital 
stock of the company. Several of the steamers 
are now closing the season. 

Captain Whitney Carr has been appointed 
assistant to Captain Samuel Leonard, manager 
of the Great Lakes Towing Company at Ashta- 
bula and Conneaut. The business has grown 
rapidly at the latter port, and Captain Smith 
decided to relieve Captain Leonard of some 
work. 

A cargo of wheat, which left Fort William 
on the steamer Rosemount recently, was later 
loaded on the ocean steamer at Montreal, for 
Europe, breaking the record for fast ship- 
ments. The grain was brought by the steamer 
Rosemount and came down the St. Lawrence 
in river barges. 

T. Wall, a seaman on the steamer Kaliyuga 
was recently injured by a falling stack and was 
removed to St. Joseph's hospital at Lorain. He 
was painting the sides of the vessel. One of 
the whirlies swung around and struck the stack 
of No. 3 machine, knocking it off. It fell on 
Wall's back and knocked him to the ground. • 

Articles of incorporation of the Franklin 
Steamship Company were recently filed in the 
office of the register of deeds at Duluth. These 
provide for a capitalization of $155,000. The 
highest liability to which the company can be- 
come charged is $220,000. The signing mem- 
bers are : President, David W. Stocking ; vice- 
president, John W. Wolvin; secretary and 
treasurer, G. Ashley Tomlinson, Fred P. 
Houghton and Herbert R. Spencer. 

The car-ferry Ann Arbor No. 3, which ar- 
rived at Manistique, recently, reported having 
passed the abandoned schooner Senator ten 
miles south of Point Au Barques. The spars 
were gone and the derelict was making heavy 
weather in the gale. There was no sign of the 
crew, who must have left the wreck some time 
before. The abandoned boat was built in 1863 
and was owned by Candler Bros, of Detroit. 
She measures 332 tons. 



TONAWANDA LETTER LIST. 



Anderson, H. B. 
Andrasen, Nills S. 
Atcheson, Fred 
Brown, Clarence J. 
Bergorstrom, Oscar 
Baase, Paul 
Brown, Fred C. 
Bandon, Fred 
Brown, Joe 
Brinniers, Heer K. 
Carlsen, Carl 
Coburn, J. 
Cobb, James W. 
Cunningham, John 
Clare, Frank 
Conger, Joseph 
Champine, Tony 
Cattanach, Ralph 
Christensen, Chas. 
Curire, John 
Corran, F. 
Charlson, Karl A. 
Danielsson, J. 
Donaldson, Chas. B. 
Daugherty, James 
Drucks, Louis 
Engelson, J. M. 
Fjeldsgaard, Adolf 
Furtaw, Parker 
Farran, James 
Glanz, Edw., Jr. 
Gillgren, Peter 
Green, J. S. 
Gay, Harry B. 
Housen, Thergrln. 
Hansen, Martin 
Heeley, Edmond 
Hillman, J. R. 
Hansan, A. 
Hansen, Karl Otto 



Herring, S. A. 
Hillman, Henry 
Hanson, P. 
Jacobson, August 
Johnson, Joe 
Johanssan, Carl 
Karlsen, Karl A. 
Knudsen, H. 
Kozlaske, Michael 
Karlsson, G. P. 
Leeland, W .M. 
Lundgren, Victor 
Lafarge, John 
Eabo, Peter 
Maese, Max 
Mathiasen, Oscar 
Magnassan, C. J. 
McGrath, R. 
McLawby, Ed. 
McDonald. MuraocK 
McLeod, Thos. 
McNamara, Michael 
Nicholson. Andrew 
Milsen, Nils. 
Nilsen, Welenius 
Pedersen, A. H. 
Palmatier, George 
Pederson, N. A. 
Omonsen, Tollak 
Rankin, Jae. W. 
Sullivan, S. P. 
Sarsen, Pick. 
Shannon. H. P. 
Stalls, William 
Sheldon, H. S. 
Tovatt, Frank 
Van Antyerp, Chas. 
Waters, Frank 
Young, James 



CONNEAUT LETTER LIST. 



Bjomlund, Axel 
Badgley, Frank. 
Caldwell, Jno. D. 
Critchley, Albert 
Davis, Thos. 
Devney, Will 
Dahl, Ernst 
Fuller, Archie 



Grant, Wm. 
Henderson, D. J. 
Hill, Harry 
Ingman, Gust. 
Isaacs, Freeman J. 
McNeeley, Matt. 
Paulson, Hans 
Wadsworth, Frank 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Charles Strachan, member of the Lake Seamen 's 
Union, is requested to communicate with Dr. H. Wilson, 
General Hospital, Conneaut, O. 

Emil Lundberg, of Boda, Oland, Sweden, last heard 
from in San Francisco in 1899, is inquired for by G. 
R. Lambert, 158 92d St., So. Chicago, 111. 

James Perry, a member of the Lake Seamen 's 
Union, is inquired for by his brother. Address, Fred 
Perry, 133 Clinton street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Milton Briggs Wiley is inquired for by his mother. 
at Philadelphia, Pa. Any information concerning his 
whereabouts should be sent to Lake Seamen 's Union, 
121-123 North Desplaines street, Chicago, 111. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lakes District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

121 and 123 North Desplaines Street, Chicago, 111. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 



BRANCHES. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 171 East River Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1295. 

TOLEDO, 719 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6981. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone Peoples 4615. 

BAY CITY, MICH 919 North Water Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 94 Hamilton Street 

SUB-AGENCIES. 

MANITOWOC, WIS 809 South Eighth Street 

ERIE, PA 107 East Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 

SANDUSKY, 1107 Adams Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 931 Military Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL; DETROIT, MICH.; CLEVELAND, O. 



RELIEF 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Erie, Pa. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludlngton, Mich. 
Manistel, Mich. 



STATIONS. 

Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



We Don't Patronize. 

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Bread — McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo.; 
National Biscuit Company. Chicago, 111. 

Cigars — Carl Upman of New York City; Kerbs. 
Wertheim & Schiffer, of New York City; The Henry 
George and Tom Moore. 

Flour — Washburn, Crosby Milling Co.. Minneapolis. 
Minn.; Kelley Milling Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City. 

Meats — Kingan Packing Company, of Indianapolis. 
Ind. 

Pipes — Wm. Demuth & Co., New York. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 



CLOTHING. 
Buttons — Davenport Pearl Button Company. Daven- 
port, Iowa; Krementz & Co., Newark. N. J. 
Clothing- — N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 

Clothiers' Exchange, Rochester, N. Y. ; Strawbridge 

& Clothier. Philadelphia, Pa.; Blauner Bros.. New 

York. 
Corsets — Chicago Corset Company. 
Gloves — J. H. Cownie Glove Co., Des Moines, [own; 

California Glove Co., Napa, Cal. 
Hats — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. 

M. Knox Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Shirts and Collars — United Shirt and Collar Company, 

Troy, N. Y.; Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co., Troy, N. Y.; 

Cluett, Peabody & Co., Troy, N. Y.; James R. 

Kaiser, New York City. 
Shoes — Harney Bros., Lynn, Mass.; J. E. Tilt Shoe 

Co., Chicago, 111. 
Suspenders — Russell Mfg. Co., Middletown, Conn. 
Textiles — Merrimae Manufacturing Company (printed 

goods), Lowell, Mass. 
Underwear — Oneita Knitting Mills. 1'tica, N. Y. 
Woolens — Hartford Carpet Co., Thompsonville, Conn.: 

J. Capps & Son, Jacksonville, 111. 



PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders — Geo. M. Hill Co., Chicago, 111.; Boorum 
& Pease Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Newspapers — Philadelphia Democrat. Philadelphia. 
Pa.; Hudson, Kimberly & Co., printers, of Kansas 
City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey Co., publishers, Hammond 
Ind.; Gazette, Terre Haute, Ind.; Times, Los An- 
geles, Cal. 

POTTERY, GLASS, STONE, AND CEMENT. 

Pottery and Brick — J. B. Owens Pottery Co. of Zanes- 
ville, Ohio; Northwestern Terra Cotta Co., of Chi- 
cago, 111.; C. W. Stine Pottery Co., White Cottage, 
Ohio; Harbison-Walker Refractory Co., Pittsburg, 
Pa.; Utica Hydraulic Cement and Utica Cement 
Mfg. Co., Utica, 111. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 

Carriage and Wagon Builders — S. R. Bailey & Co., 
Amesbury, Mass.; Hassett & Hodge, Amesbury, 
Mass.; Carr, Prescott & Co., Amesbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark, ^Etna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Iver Johnson Arms 
Company, Fitchburg, Mass.; Kelsey Furnace Com- 
pany, Syracuse, N. Y. ; Brown & Sharpe Tool Com- 
pany, Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery Com- 
pany, Turner's Falls, Mass.; Atlas Tack Company, 
Fairhaven, Mass.; Henry Disston & Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa.; American Hardware Co. (Russell & Er- 
win Co. and P. & F. Corbin Co.), New Britain, Conn.; 
Merritt & Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, of 
Carpentersville, 111.; Carborundum Company, Niag- 
ara Falls, N. Y. ; Casey & Hedges, Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; Gurney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont.; 
Sattley Manufacturing Company, Springfield, Ohio; 
Page Needle Company, Franklin, N. H. ; American 
Circular Loom Company, New Orange, N. J.; Payne 
Engine Company, Elmira, N. Y. ; Lincoln Iron Works 
(F. R. Patch Manufacturing Company I. Rutland, 
Vt. ; Art Metal Construction Company, Jamestown, 
N. Y. ; Erie City Iron Works, Erie, Pa.; David May- 
dole Hammer Co., Norwich. N. Y.; Singer Sewing 
Machine Company, Elizabeth, N. J.; National Ele- 
vator and Machine Company. Honesdale, Pa.; Pitts- 
burg Expanded Metal Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Iron, Architectural — Geo. L. Meskir. Evansville, Ind. 

Stoves — Germer Stove Company, Erie, Pa.; "Radiant 
Horn*" Stoves, Ranges and Hot Air Blast, Erie, Pa.; 
Wrought Iron Range Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
WOOD AND FURNITURE. 

Bag-s — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 
Bemis Bros., St. Louis, Mo. 

Baskets — Williams Manufacturing Company, North- 
ampton, Mass. 

Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster 
Company, of Davenport, Iowa; M. Goeller's Sons, 
Circleville, Ohio; Merkle-Wiley Broom Co., Paris, 
Illinois. 

Carriages — Crane, Breed & Co., Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Cooperage — Northwestern Cooperage and Lumber 
Company (otherwise known as the Buckeye Stave 
Company), of Ohio, Michigan, and Wisconsin; Elgin 
Butter Tub Company, Elgin, HI.; Williams Cooper- 
age Company and Palmer Manufacturing Company, 
of Poplar Bluff, Mo. 

China — Wick China Company. Kittanning, Pa. 

Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio; Brumby Chair Company, Marietta, (la.; 
O. Wisncr Piano Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Krell 
Piano Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; N. Drucker & Co., 
Cincinnati, Ohio, trunks; St. Johns Table Company. 
St. Johns, Mich.; Grand Rapids Furniture Manufac- 
turing Association, Grand Rapids, Mich.; Derby 
Desk Co., Boston, Mass. 

Gold Deaf — W. H. Kemp Company, New York, N. v.: 
Andrew Reeves, Chicago, 111.; George Reeves. Cape 
May, N. J.; Hastings Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Henry Ayers, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lumber — Trinity County Lumber Company, Grove- 
ton, Texas; Reinle Bros. & Solomon. Baltimore, 
Md.; Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company, 
Morehouse, Mo.; Union Lumber Company, Fort 
Bragg, Cal. 

Leather — Kullman, Salz & Co., Benicia, Cal.; A. B. 
Patrick & Co., San Francisco. Cal.; Columbus Buggy 
and Harness Company, Columbus, Ohio; Lerch 
Bros., Baltimore, Md. 

Rubber — Kokomo Rubber Company, Kokomo, Ind.; B. 
F. Goodrich Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio; Dia- 
mond Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Paper Boxes — E. N. Rowell & Co., Batavia. N. Y. ; J. 
N. Roberts & Co., Metropolis, 111. 

Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Co., Norfolk, N. Y. ; 
Potter Wall Paper Co., Hoboken, N. J. 

Typewriters — Underwood Typewriter Company, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, of Phila- 
delphia. Pa.; Crescent Courvoiseer Wilcox Com- 
pany; Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Company, 
Sag Harbor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Advertising Novelties — Novelty Advertising Com- 
pany, Coshocton, Ohio. 

Burlap — H. B. Wiggins' Sons' Company, Bloomfield, 
N. J. 

Bill Pasters — Bryan & Co.. Cleveland, Ohio. 

Railways — Atchison, Topeka and Santa !'•• Railroad; 
Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. 

Telegraphy— Western Union Telegraph Company, and 
its Messenger Service. 

D. M. Parry, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Wellman, Osborne & Co., Lynn, Mass.; Thomas Taylor 
& Son, Hudson, Mass. 

C W. Post, Manufacturer of Grape Nuts and Postum 
Cereal, Battle Creek, Mich. 

Lehmaier-Swartz & Co., New York City. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



On the Atlantic Coast. 



(Continued from page 3.) 



landed in New Sork every year. On motion, 
a committee of five was appointed to investi- 
the matter and frame such recommenda- 
tions, to be acted upon, as in their judg- 
ment would put a stop to the practice of smug- 
gling aliens into the port of New York with- 
out the knowledge of the Ellis Island au- 
thorities. 



Since the recent accident on the elevated 
road in New York, in which twelve persons 
were killed and forty injured through the in- 
capacity of a motorman, who was a Parley 
strike-breaker, the company has gradually 
dropped the men in their employ who got 
there through taking the places of strikers in 
the strike ( t last March. It is said that the 
damage suits against the company resulting 
from the nferesaid accident will aggregate sev- 
eral mill ion dollars, and as their experience 
with Farley's men has. up to date, been of the 
costly suit, it will be seen that the managers 
,,!' the road are not quite so wise as they 
thought they were. None but fools ever have 
much occasion to lock the door of the stable 
a ft ei- the horse has been stolen. 



President Roosevelt's admirers are busy 
with all sorts of schemes for furnishing him 
with outlets for the surplus strenuosity which 
he is expected to have on hand at the expira- 
tion of his present term. The latest is the 
raising of a fund with which to equip him for 
going in search of the North Pole and bring- 
ing it here. It is a cold proposition, to be 
sure; but as Mr. Roosevelt is generally 
credited with a warm temperament, it would 
not be surprising if he were to fall in with 
the scheme, heart and soul. 



The resolution favoring exclusion from the 
United States of Japanese and Korean coolies, 
which was adopted at the recent annual con- 
vention of the International Elevator Con- 
structors' Union, shows which way the wind 
is blowing. Better tell the watch below to be 
handy for a call; there is going to be a hot 
time this winter in Washington about this ex- 
clusion business, and before it is over Mongo- 
lian stock will be down to 30 cents per 1000 
shares. 



Jupiter Pluvius was the most conspicuous 
participant in the New York Labor Day pa- 
rade. Goodness, hut how it rained! If Mr. 
Post had conspired with the Weather Bureau 
no worse brand of non-union weather could 
have been turned out for the day of all days. 
However, the boys had a good time, just the 
same, for what the day lacked in spectacular 
displays it made up in enthusiasm and all- 
round good fellowship. 



The Presbyterian Church, it is reported, has 
entered upon an agitation to advance the 

cause of organized labor. This news suggests 
that some one must have read, marked and 
inwardly digested the tale about Mahomet 

and the mountain. 



The things that stimulate the minds of one 
generation of men often become as insipid to 
the next as wafer to a tippler or common sense 
In an Utopian reformer. I] very age has a spe- 
cial method in its madness. 



Fag Ends. 



[gnorance is a safer companion through life 
than error. 



To deserve succcess is not always to be able 
to command it. 



No wealth or power can compensate for an 
accusing conscience. 



Experience is about the only thing men 
would rather buy than borrow. 

Knowledge is power and time is money, yet 
most of us are wasters of both. 



'Tis better to be honored by the lowly than 
merely tolerated by the great. 



Man knows but little, and most of that little 
he would be much better off without knowing. 



Man's hatred still rules more strongly than 
his love ; revenge is ardent, gratitude but luke- 
warm. 



In passing through life it is of more im- 
portance to know what to avoid than what to 
choose. 



All the good intentions we ever had will 
not compensate for even one evil which we 
have done. 



Civilization's most absurd customs usually 

rest upon and are enforced by the hoariest 
precedents. 



Work for the Initiative and Referendjun 
and the Recall, the three fundamental props 
of democracy. 



< >nly that part of our existence which we 
have spent in improving ourselves really de- 
serves to be called life. 



It is better to deserve the esteem of our 
lellowmen without obtaining it, than to obtain 
it without deserving it. 



The truth concerning most things is gen- 
erally found at the half-way station between 
the extremes of unbelief and fanaticism. 



Persuasion is the weapon of rational men 
inspired by the spirit of charity; persecution 
is the weapon of bigots inspired by fanati- 
cism. 



Few men will make the journey of life with- 
out discovering that it is much easier to con- 
found one's enemies than to please one's 
friends. 



It is a curious paradox that men will go 
to war and fight to defend and uphold princi- 
ples which they seldom think of living up to 
in time of peace. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



We can not all be wise or witty or pro- 
found, but every man can be liberal in his 
views and opinions of other men, and only to 
the extent that we are thus liberal can we 
claim to be really civilized. 



Most minds are so constituted that they can 
not grasp even a little that is to the purpose 
unless that little has been greatly diluted with 
much that is not to the purpose. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with the 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER. Secretary-Treasurer. 
1V6A Lewis St., Boston, M;iss. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 
BOSTON, MASS., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
BANGOR, ME., 211 Broad St. 
PORTLAND, ME., 3T7A Fore St. 
NEW BEDFORD, MASS.. 7 South Water St. 
PROVIDENCE. R. I.. 464 South Main St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51-52 South St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 68 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA. PA., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, MD., 604 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK. VA., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, ALA., 104 Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS. LA., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 
BRUNSWICK, GA. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N .Y., 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, MASS., 284 Commercial St. 
JERSEY CITY, N. J.. 35 Hudson St 
PHILADELPHIA, PA.. 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, MR. 1736 Thames St. 
NORFOLK. VA., 89 Church St. 
NEWPORT NEWS. VA.. 2814 Washington Ave. 
MOBILE. ALA.. 104 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y. t 166 Christopher St. 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON. MASS., Commercial Wharf. 

Branch: 
GLOUCESTER, MASS.. 141 £ Main St 






INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, ILL., 121-123 North Desplaines St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, WIS., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., ^7 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND. O.. 171 East River St. 
TOLEDO, O., 719 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y.. 162 Main St. 
DETROIT, MICH., 7 Woodbrldpe St., East. 
SUPERIOR, WIS., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND. WIS., 515 East Serond St 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 94 Hamilton St 
BAY CITY, MICH.. 919 North Water St. 
MANITOWOC, WIS., 809 South Eighth St. 
ERIE. PA., 107 East Third St 
SOETH CHICAGO. H,I,.. ;. M - Mackinaw St. 
CONNEAET HARBOR. O. 992 Day St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 1107 Adams St. 
PORT HURON, MICH.. 981 Military St 






MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO. N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca S23 R. 

Branches: 
I iETROIT. MICH. 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TO.VA WANDA, N. Y., 164 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y.. 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY. MICH., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., Tel. 305. 
CLEVELAND, O., Atwater Bldg., Room 1. 
CHICAGO, ILL.. 42 Wells St. Tel. Main .",'',.",7. 
MILWAUKEE, WIS., 317 Florida St. 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT, O., 981 Day St. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., Southwest corner East 
and Mission Sts. 

Branches : 
TACOMA, WASH.. 3004 McCarver St. 
SEATTLE, WASH., 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNSEND. WASH, 114 Qulncy St. 
ABERDEEN - . WASH., P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND, OR., 40 Union Ave. 
EUREKA. CAL.. P. O. Box 327. 
SAN PEDRO ,CAL.. P. o. Box 2380. 
HONOLULU, H. T„ P. O. Box 96. 



PACIFIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S ONION. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 46 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, WASH., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters : 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.. 54 Mission St. 

BrjincliGS * 
SEATTLE, WASH., Colman Dock. Room 9. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL., P. O. Box 2155. 



FISHERMEN'S PROTECTIVE UNION OF THE 
PACIFIC COAST AND ALASKA. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 9 Mission St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, WASH., P. O. Box 4 2. 
ASTORIA, OR., P. O. Box 183. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 54 Mission St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, CAL., 200 M St. 



THE COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALIA 

29 Erskine Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



List of Union Offices 

ALLIED PRINTING TRADES 

COUNCIL 

of San Francisco, Cal. 



Abbott, F. H., 314-316 Battery. 

Altvater Printing Co., 2593-2595 Mission 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

American Printing House, 1067 Market. 

Art Printery, The, 41-43 Eighth. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery. 

Barry, Jas. H., The Star Press, 429 
Montgomery. 

Belcher & Phillips, 508 Clay. 

Ben Franklin Press, 123 Seventh. 

Bensen & Liss, 776 Bryant. 

Berry Bros., 320 Sansome. 

Bickell, L. A., 19 First. 

Black Cat Press, 402 McAllister. 

Boulin-Leichner Co., 519 Filbert. 

Brown, Andrew Printing Co., First and 
Mission. 

Brunt, W. N. Co., 102-104 Second. 

Budde, H. F., Cal. Press, 407 % Turk. 

Church Press, 23 Davis. 

Collins, C. J., 16 Hayes. 

Cook, The Morton L., 144 Second. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Cubery & Co., 587 Mission. 

Danish Printing Co., 410 Kearny. 

Daily Racing News, 21-23 First. 

Day & McClinton, 538 Sacramento. 

Drake & Baker, 850 Market. 

Drum Bros.. 638 Mission. 

Eagle Printing Co., The, 344 Kearny. 

Eastman, Frank & Co.. 509 Clay. 

Eastman & Mitchell, 415 Market. 

Fording & Halle, 22 Clay. 

Francis-Valentine Co., 5 Anna Lane, off 
Eddy. 

Gabriel Printing Co., 320 Sansome. 

Galloway Publishing Co., 146 Second. 

Gilmartin Publishing Co., The, 19 First. 

Guedet Printing Co., 935 Market. 

Golden State Printing Co., 73 Third. 

Golden West Press, 146 Second. 

Granger & Caldwell, 526 Montgomery. 

Hancock Bros., 809 Mission. 

Harvey, John D, 509 Clay. 

Hayden Printing Co., 417 Montgomery. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

Hiester, Wm. A., 529 California. 

Hughes, E. C. & Co., 511 Sansome. 

Illinois Pacific Glass Works, 10-16 Main 

Jalumstein Printing Co., 310 Hayes. 

Knarston Printing Co., 529 Washington. 

Lafontain, J. R., 603 Merchant. 

Latham & Emanuel, 511 Sacramento. 

Leader, The, 532 Commercial. 

Leilich & Colburn, City Hall Square. 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

Levingston, L., 540 Clay. 

Luce & Her Co., 406 Sansome. 

Lynch, James T., 514 Kearny. 

Lyon, W. T. & Co., 161 First. 

Majestic Press, The, 1566 Market. 

McCracken Printing Co., 509 Kearny. 

Medina & Co., 221 Sacramento. 

Meyerfield, Albert M., 414 Pine. 

Monahan, John & Co., 412 Commercial. 

Moore-Hinds Co., 149 Natoma. 

Morris & Bain, 320 Sansome. 

Murdock, C. A. & Co., 532 Clay. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Nevin, C. W. & Co., 532 Commercial. 

Occidental Mystic Press, 6 Cottage Row 

Pacific Goldsmith Publishing Co., 146 
Second. 

Partridge, John, 306 California. 

Pernau Bros., 543 Clay. 

Phelan, F. M., Ill Cook. 

Phillips & Van Orden, 508 Clay. 

Police Bulletin of San Francisco, Hall 
of Justice. 

Polyglott Press, 628 Montgomery. 

Recorder Publishing Co., 516 Commer- 
cial. 

Roesch, Louis Co., 321-25 Sansome. 

Rooney, J. V. Co., 1308 Mission. 

Samuel, Wm., 411% California. 

San Francisco Newspaper Union, 405- 
407 Sansome. 

Schreiber, P. H., 809 Mission. 

Shanly, J. M., 414 Clay. 

Smyth, Owen H, 511 Sacramento. 

Spaulding, Geo. & Co., 414 Clay. 

Springer & Co., 240 Ellis. 

Standard Printing Co., 518 Clay. 

Stanley-Taylor Co., 656 Mission. 

Sterett Co., W. I., 933 Market. 

Sterling Press, 229 Stevenson. 

Stuetzel & Co., 144 Second. 

Sunset Press, 1327 Market. 

Sutter Press, The, 240 Stockton. 

Tomoye Press, 144 Union Square av. 

Town Talk Printing Co., 146 Second. 

Turner, H. S., 3232 Mission. 

Valleau & Peterson, 410 Sansome. 

Wale Printing Co., 621 Clay. - 

Wenderoth & Brown, 319 California. 

Werner, Geo. A., 1067 Howard. 

Western Fine Arts Co., 529 Clay. 

Williams, Joseph, 142 Seventh. 

Wilson, Geo. F., 405 Front. 

Winkler, Chas. W., 146 Second. 

Winterburn, Jos., 417 Clay. 

Woodward, W. A. & Co., 12 Sutter. 
Bookbinders. 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

Brown & Power Co., 508 Clay. 

Buswell & Co., 536 Clay. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

McGreeney, Wm. H., 23 Stevenson. 

Kitchen, Jr. Co., John, 510-514 Com- 
mercial. 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

Mclntyre, J. B., 424 Sansome. 

Malloye, F., 422 Sacramento. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Phillips Bros., 505 Clay. 

Rotermundt, Hugo L., 413 Sacramento. 

Webster, Fred L., 19 First. 

Whelan, Richard I. & Co., 42 Steuart. 

San Francisco Mailing Co., 609 Mission, 
5th floor. 

Photo Engravers and Etchers. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery, near Mission. 

Bolton & Strong, 621 Clay. 

California Engraving Co., 506 Market. 

San Francisco Etching Co., 109 New 
Montgomery. 

McCabe & Sons, 611 Merchant. 

Sierra Engraving Co., 324 Grant av. 

Sunset Engraving Co., 108 Union Square 
av. 

Union Engraving Co., 144 Union Square 
av. 

Yosemite Engraving Co., 2.4 Montgom- 
ery. 

Electrotypers and Stereotypers. 

American Press Association, 19 First. 

Hoffschneider Bros., 412 Commercial. 

Martin & Co., 508 Clay. 




\A10FT> 

«"l BLUB FLANNEL 
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S FZANNBL 
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DEMAND ™BRAND 




General News. 



SCANDINAVIAN AMERICAN SAVINGS BANK 

Cor. Bush and Montgomery Sts. (Mills Building) 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Capital, $300,000. Total Assets, $1,000,000 

Directors Advisory Board 

Charles Nelson Martin Sanders E. W. Ferguson J. Jensen 

Lewis I, Cowgill W. H. Little Fr. C. Siebe A. T. Dunbar 

J. C. Eschen Henry Wilson Mikal Olsen J. C. Everding 

Geo. H. Tyson S. D. Denson, Attorney 

Saving Accounts Solicited. Commercial deposits subject to check. Inter- 
est paid on savings and commercial balances, and allowed from date of de- 
posit. Drafts, Telegraphic Exchange and Letters of Credit issued, payable 
in New York, London, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and all the prin- 
cipal cities of Europe and America. Open Saturday evenings from 6:30 to 8, 
for deposits. 




Notice! Notice! 
REMOVED 

THE UNITED STATES 
WATCH CLUB 

9 SPEAR ST., Buckley Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Merchant Tailor 

REMOVED TO 

9 Spear Street, Buckley Bldg. 

PHONE MONTGOMERY 1242 

SAN FRANCISCO 




The Scandinavian 
Sailors' Home 

Cor. Drumm and Commercial Sts. 

Telephone James 4846. 

A new building erected especially for sail- 
ors. Latest improvements, clean and light 
rooms, bath, reading and dining rooms. 
Flrst-clasa board and lodging at reasonable 
rates. Gospel service — Sundays, 3:45 p. m., 
and Wednesdays, 8 o'clock p. m. All wel- 
come. 

A. ANDERSON 

Missionary and Manager. 



The Hamburg Senate has abolished 
the order of September 1, which per- 
mitted the transportation of Russian 
emigrants through that port, but the six- 
day quarantine order remains in force. 

The Venezuelan Government has or- 
dered from the Creusot "Works, France, 
thirty batteries of field artillery and 
twelve batteries of modern guns of 
seventy millimeters caliber. 

It is rumored that the recent explo- 
sion on the Japanese battleship Mikasa 
was due to a mutiny caused by dissatis- 
faction among the crew over the peace 
terms. 

Tom Seabwright, a negro ex-convict, 
who committed criminal assault on two 
negro girls, was taken from the county 
officers at Bainbridge, Ga., by a mob of 
negroes and lynched on October 8. 

The Civil Service Commission is pre- 
paring to forward a circular letter to 
all Government employes warning them 
against campaign contributions as in 
violation of the regulations. 

The Mississippi State Board of 
Health has issued an order forbidding 
boarding schools and colleges in that 
State to open before November 1, on ac- 
count of the yellow fever infection. 

The Japanese Navy Department an- 
nounces the seizure on October 7, near 
the Island of Tsu, of the Norwegian 
steamer Amphrite, bound for "Vladivo- 
stok. The German steamer Carl, bound 
for Nicolaiefsk, was seized on the 6th 
near the Tsu Islands. 

The members of the British mission 
who spent two and one-half years in 
marking the boundary between Persia 
and Afghanistan, in the Seistan region, 
report that they encountered terrible 
hardships. Fifty of the members died 
from various causes, and nearly 5,000 
camels and 120 horses succumbed. 

In order that the damage resulting 
from the recent typhoon in the Philippine 
Islands may at once be repaired, and to 
prevent suffering among the many peo- 
ple whose houses and property were de- 
stroyed by it, the Quartermaster-General 
of the United States Army has cabled to 
Manila that an extra allotment of $50,- 
000 has been made to meet the expenses. 

The text of the international agree- 
ment for the suppression of what is 
known as the white slave traffic, has 
been issued in London. The countries 
joining in it are the United Kingdom, 
Germany, Austria-Hungary, Belgium, 
Denmark, Spain, France, Italy, Holland, 
Portugal, Russia, Sweden and Norway 
and Switzerland. 

Surgeon-General R. M. O 'Eerily of 
the Army has submitted an exhaustive 
report on the health conditions of the 
Army to Secretary of War Taft. There 
were 79,586 "admissions to the sick re- 
port" during the year, 406 deaths from 
all causes and 1377 discharges for dis- 
ability. The figures show a steady and 
progressive improvement in the health 
of the Army. 

By signing a receipt for $1,259,598,- 
278.58 2-3, which has been delivered into 
his keeping, after two months and a 
half had been spent in counting it, 
Charles H. Treat, of New York, Treas- 
urer of the United States, has completed 
the largest financial transaction in the 
history of the world. The sum named 
is the reserve fund of the United States 
and is stored at Washington, D. C. 

Responsibility for the accident on the 
New York Elevated Railroad, on Sep- 
tember 11, in which twelve persons Inst 
their lives, has been fixed upon two men, 
Cornelius A. Jackson, the towerman, 
and Motonnan Kelly, who were both 
charged with criminal negligence. Jack- 
son was arraigned before the Coroner 
and released on $5000 bail, Kelly, the 
motonnan, has been missing ever since 
the accident. 



b 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's WorKers 



\ strike of the motonnen employed by 
the Electric Street Car Company at San 
t iago de Chili, was declared on ( ' 
4. 

The British Trade-Union Congress, .-it 
its recent session, defeated a resolution 
in favor of compulsory arbitration by 
•' majority of 92,000 votes. 

It is said that the wages of the work- 
ers in the Scotch shipbuilding trades 

arc rising, on aeeoiint of a boom in that 

industry. 

The number of women factory inspect- 
ors in England is to lie increased. It 
is found that women an' an hi' successful 
in detecting offenders under the Factory 

ami Workshop Arts than arc men. 

The net effect of all the changes in 
rates of British wages reported in Au- 
gust was a decrease in wages of £966 
per week. The changes affected 247, 
47.". workpeople, of whom 92,76] receiv- 
ed advances, while about i."i4.7lu bus 
tained decn 

A lockout in three of the lii^' electrical 
works in Berlin began on September 30. 

It affects all the factories of the AJge- 
nieine, the Siemens Ilalske and tin 

mens Schiirkert companies, except 

lamp factory, and throws about 
workmen out of employment. 

A dispute in the building trades in 

Munich, Germany, has been settled, and 
work was resumed on August -'■' owing 
to an i t under which the mini- 

mum hourly rate I'm- bricklayers is to be 
(id., for carpenters, 5%d., and for la 

. I'j d. 
The strike of the electrical workers at 

Merlin, Qermany, 1ms extended to two 
factories. The total number of 

men out is 38, (Hid. No disturbances 
have occurred. Enough men have been 
obtained to Supply a current sufficient to 
keep two-thirds of the street cars going. 
A new Belgian law prescribes that in 
warehouses or shops in which goods are 
stmed or sold, seats shall be provided in 
the proportion of one to each female as- 
sistant, and that such assistants shall be 

allowed to use them whenever they can 
do so without hindrance to their duties. 
The French ami Colombian colonies at 
Colon, Panama, are increasing rapidly. 
The steamer Versailles, which recently 
arrived, brought 700 laborers from the 
island of Martinique, French West lu- 

and 300 from Cartagena, Col bia. 

These an- to I"- employed mi the Pana- 
ma Canal works. 

On and after July 17, 1906, a new law 

operated in Belgium, by which employes 
in industrial and commercial establish- 
ments (other than members of the em- 
ployer's family or his domestic ser- 
vants) will not be allowed to work more 
than six days per week, Sunday being 
observed as the day of rest. 

The changes in hours of British labor 
reported during August, affected 784 
workpeople, whose aggregate working 
time was decreased by 1642 hours per 
week. During the eight months — Janu- 
ary to August, the total number of Brit- 
ish workpeople reported as affected by 
iges in hours of labor was 6513, the 
net decrease in their working time being 
15,443 hours pel week. 

The Queensland Typographical Asso- 
ciation's half-yearly report congratu- 
lates the members on the steady progress 
of the organization. The assets are 
worth over £77<), liabilities nil, and the 
financial membership totals 186. Men- 
tion is made that the Association's rea- 
sonable request for preference for 
unionists seeking employment in the 
Government 1'rinting Office has been ac- 
to, and that the Association is 
now affiliated with the Australasian 
Typographical I'nion, thus coming into 
line with all the other Commonwealth 
typi igra ph ical societies. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters are advertised for six months 
an.l kept at the Sailors' Union Office for 
twelve months, all told. If not o 
for at the expiration of one year 1' 
will be returned to the Postofflce. 



Aamodt, 1. i-. 

A ass, T. A. 

Abrahamsen, A. 
Adolf. C. 
Aglitzky, Hans 
Allmers, !•'. 
Amundsen, Pet. 
Amundsen-1014 
Andersen-7 1 I 
Andersen-100'J 
Andersen, E. O. 
Andersen-1 80 i 
Andersen-1-:;.". 
Andersen. A. II. 
Andersen, Sigurd 
Anderi 

len, Eskil 
Andersen-1 l l 3 
Andersen-1 191 
Andersen-1 272 

isen, Ed. 
Balke, Henry 
Barber, A. 
Barleben. E. 
Barry, Midi. 
Bauer, Frank 
Bayerle, Ruperl 
Bennett, N. M. 
Bechler, J. 
Benson, Ken 
Bergh, A.-1378 
Berggren, w. 
Berggvest, Emll 
Bernard, Sandal lo 
Berthelsen. AH' 
Itiekrom. ( Mans 
Bindseil, W. 
Bengtson-1272 
Bjornvik, Karl 

in- 7 5 8 
('arisen. Hans 
Carlson-760 
Carlsson, John 
Carlsson- 1 19 

U. jas. B. 

Caspary, Sigard 
Chalmberlain. 1,. 
Chevis. Frank 
t thrlstensen-8 1 8 
Dahlgren. Oscar 
Danielson, Ernst 
Degn, Paul 
De Groot, J. 
De Jong, \V. 
Eck, Nicolas 
Ekblom-507 
Ekendahl. Carl 
Kklund, Ellis 
Ellassen, J. A. 
Eliassen. Ed. 
Flingsen, P. 
Engell, E. 
Engstrom, ("has. 
Fagerlund, G. E. 
Fahlesen, Emll 
Foley, James 
Forslund, Victor 
Forssell, Frans 
Gabrlelsen, Knud 
Gasman, <;. \. 
Gelssler, F. 
Gibbs. G. W. 
Gilholm, A. 
Gent-561 

Gottschalk, -Max 
Qrahn, C. 
. 1 1. 
Eiaglund, E. M. 
Hafstrom, Fred 
Hakansson, Fred 
Halvorsen. .1. 
Hallberg, Herman 
Hammarsten, O. 
Hansen- 1116 7 
Hansen, Alt'. 

!, Hans R. 
Hansen-1229 
Hansen, H. C. 
Hansen, Fred S. 
Hansen-1567 
Hansen-Edwart 
Hansen-146 1 
Hansen. Laurits A 
Hansen, Hans-125 
I tanson- 1 1 :: 1 
Ingebretsen, J. A 
Ingebretsen, C. J. 
Isakson, G. E. 
Jansen, Henry 
Jensen-1 298 
Jensen, O. 
Jensen, P. 
Jensen-69i> 
Jepsen, Antoni 
Johanesen, M 
Johanesen-142S 
Johansen-725 
Johansen-1275 
Johansen, Ludv. 
Johansen, O. C. 
Johanson-280 
Kahlbetzer, F. 
Kandela. E. 
Karelsen-270 
Karlstrom, J. R. 
Kask, John 
Kearon, Wm. 
Kera, A. 
Kerche, August 
Klemettlla-u67 
Klosson, Chas. 
Kolderup-l^o 
Kook, Harry 
Koop, John 
Kopmann, J. 
Korthe, W. 
Lajord, E. Peder- 

sen 
Lamson, Thi 
bane, Leeland 
Larsen, Christian 
Larsen, Herman 
Larsen-613 
Larssen, M. 
Larsson, Idorth 
Laurenson, Hugh 
Laurltzen, O. 
Leander, P. 
Leithoff. Carl 
Leineweber, J. 
Leite, Hans A. 
Lepsoo, II. 
Lerche. Andrew C 
Likait, Ch. 
Llnd, Christian 

Macbeth-1121 
Madsen, P. J. 
Madsen-1035 
Mahslng, J. 



Anderson-689 

\ nilersoii, A. E. 

Anderson 

Anderson, Adolf 
Anderson, Thomas 
Anoerson, Ed. A. 
Anderson, Fred 
Anderson, A. B. 
Anderson .Andrew 
Anderson-1 !'T 
Anderson-1093 
Andersson, Oskar 
Andersson-1060 
Andersson-1 1 1 '■' 
Andersson- 1 '_'.". I 
Anfindsen- 1 u :; 7 
Arntsen, Erick 
Aselius, 

Ash ford. Q. E. 
A ust rand. I.. 
Blackley. Albert 
Blank, Charley 

k. C. 
Block, Herman 
Bock, C. 
Bohrman, Wm. 
i. Jurgen 

■ n. Knud 

Boothby, J. 
Borjesson, E. 

Boston, Andrew 
la. strum, Carl 
iwski. M. 
Brock, He 'man 
Brown, Clarence 
Bruce, J. 
Bryndal, i; 

I;. Harry 
Buset, 1. 
( 'liristens.ii. i i. U. 

it ensen-986 
Chi a. 

i'. 
Cliristens.il. M. 
Clausen-793 
Conaughton. E. 
CConnor, Wm. 
Craig. A I ex- 
Curtis, R. H. 
Doyle, \v. P. 
I Herks, Johannes 
Duncan, Herbert 
Durand, JTves 
1 lurholt, Hugo 
Enlund. O. \\ . 
Bricksoi), E. 
Erickson, John 
Erlksen, Chas. 
Eriksen-539 
Frikson, S. S. 
Evensen, A. 

MS. '11, E. 

Forstrom, s. K 

Forssl rom-997 

Fosen, a. H.-512 

Fosen. Oscar 

Fredriksson, A. 

Gronberg, Erik 

i Jronman -606 

Grunbrock, H. J. 
lersen-515 

Gulliksen, Gus 

Gunsten, G. 

Gustafson 

Gustafson-600 

Hanson, Ed. 

Hanson, J. A. 

Hanson, Maurice 

Hanson-815 

Hanson, Adolph 

Mi nsson, John 

Haraldsen, K. 

Hauge, M. X. 

Hay-1179 

Eiazeleaf, 

Hedman, John M. 

Helander, Chas. 

Heloste, C. F. 

Hermansso/., H. 

Hinriclisen, Haxry 

Holm. J. 
. I [olmes, i ' 
o i [olmes, i 'iiris !•'. 

. ista.i. Olaus 

en, Frank 

Johanson, Herman 
Johansson-SSO 
Johannesen, Osker 
Johannson, J. W. 

S. 
Johnsen, Sigv. B. 
Johnson-1399 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Harry 
Jonasson, Frans 
Jorgensen ,P. 
Jorgensen, )i. I*. 
Jorgensen, J. \V. 
Kosa. P. 
Kotcharin, J. 
Knaph, John O. 
Knieling, John 
Knudsen, H. 
Knudson, Chris 
Krieger, Adolf 
Kristiansen, Gus 
Krlstensen, s. 
Kristensen, M. 
Kriza, R. 
Kroger, L. H. 
Krogstad, F. 
Kronvall, O. 

Lindb»rg, John 
Lindberg, Fred 
l.indhurg, J. 
Lindquist, Karl 
Lindquist, C. A. 
Lindseth, Gust 
Lindstrom, Olof 
Ljungberg, W. 
Lof, Oscar 
Lofgren, C. 
Lowrie, R. A. 
Luden. Albin 
Ludwick, Bert 
Lukin, Th. 
Lundgren. G. 
Lund, Martin 
Lundin-1054 
Laws. Harry 

Mann, E. 

Mannstrom, W. 

Martin, Albert 
Matiasen, x. 



Mattejat, \V. 
Matthews. J. 
Matusewitsch, .1. 
Mau, L. 
Maule, G. 
McCormick, J. 
McKenzie, a. 
Menthen. Otto 
Michael, Walter 
Nelson, Carl a. 
Nelson, Ole 
Nelson, H. 
Nelson, W.-820 
Nielsen-751 
Neilson-&25 
Nielsen-22f. 
Nielsen, Haakan 
Nielsen. Alt'. 
.Niemann. Chr. 
Ml lsen, Josef 
Nilsen-501 
i iberhauser, J. 
id, Hans 

( ilausen, L. 

533 
< Hsen-499 

a. L. K. 

n, Anton 

I!, Hans 
i 'Isen. S. Albert 
Patulny, A'. 
Pearson, c. A, 

Pedersen, K. M. 

rsen-563 
i 'edersen-793 
Pedersen, l J . 
Pedersen, Peder E. 
Pedersen, Sigurd 

I "I'der: ■ 

Petersan, Carl-555 
Ralg, Tormod 
Ramsey, Harry 
kasmusen-525 
Ratln, Anton 
Raven, Chas. 
Reichman 

I outer, i 'has. 
Richards, Jas. 
Richmond, L. 
Robinson. John E. 
Robisch, Theo. 
Samuelsen, W. I.. 
Sander-1068 
Sandston, v.nli 
Seha, ie. Wenzel 
Schilling, Carl 
evs, Jan 
Schmehl, Paul 
Sehroeder, Fred 
Schubert-887 
Schuhmacher, \V. 
Senden, Victor 

I, P. 
Stem, Cornelius 
Simonsen, Fred 
Simpson, L. C. 
Skogsfjord, O. 
Skrrio, Mr. 
Skutvick, J. J. 
Smedburg. Da \ Id 
Smith, John 
Taberman, Erik 
Talbot, A. E. 
Tallant, Christy 
Tenzer, Franz 
Thestrup, L. P. 
Thomas, Jas. W. 
Thoresen, Pet. 
Thuestad. M. J. 
Tlemann. John 
Uberwimer, F. 
Vangsoe, J. P. J. 
v. Lubke, Joh. 
Van i icker, Mr. 
Vanstone, Mr. 
Vassallo. P. 
Watson, J. F. 
Weber, Kmil 
Wendt, Herman 
Westergren, A. 
Westerholm, \v. 
Westin, Otto 
West in, Jolin 
Wlberg, John 
Young. Alt 
Zervas, John 



Mlchelson. H. M. 
Monrroy, P. 
Moran, Aleck 
Morrlsse, i>. 
Morrlsse, I. 
Morris. Wm. T. 
Morrison, H. 
Mortimer, E. 
Munroe-430 
Nilsen, Bernt 
Nilson-66 I 
Nilssen-737 
Nilsson-698 
Nisson, Ja no s 
Noack, II 
Norbin, Axel 
Nordberg, Oscar 
Nordlund, F. 
Nordstrom, O. E. 
Nylund, Chas. 

.N.inan. J. C. 
Olsson. Waldeaiar 
Olsson-562 
Olsson, Gus 
i ilsson, K. E. 
on, J A. 
Opderbeck, F. 
i isterberg, i !arl 
Oversell, Andreas 

isen, Gus E. 
I vt.-i son-990 
Peterson, M. 
Peterson, Chas. 
Pet row, F. 
Pettersen, Loren 
Pettersen, Joh 
Petterson, Axel 
i 'el terson-851 
Plckelmann, L. 

Rockwell, Theo. 

Kol.t. 
Rosenquist, Alf. 
-irom. F. 
Ross, Joseph A. 
Roth. G. 

Rudlaff, r.. 
Rudsit F. 
Russell, W. 

Smith, C. H. 
Smith. F. 
Sorensen-1 (92 
Sorensen, J. M. 
Sorensen, Th. 
Sorensen, Jorgen 
Sorensen, C. 
Stahn, Otto 
Starkey. W. 
Stedman, Q. F. 
Stephan-1 IBS 

1S16 
Storsten, Henrik 
Steuer, John 

pi a, S. M. 
Strandquist. L. 
Stromberg, W. 
Swan son-l 252 
Swartholm, C. 
ierg, Ax.-l 
Tiesing. Ed. A. 
Tlerney, John 
Todt, John 
Tollefsen. John 
Torkel-503 
Trepin. C. 

sen, Marinus 
Tuxen, Carl 
Tyrholm. Johan 
Unruh, Paul 
Voigt. Arthur 
\'<ui Asperen, W. 

l, V. 
Wall, R. A. 
W'arta. Arthur 
Wi 1st rand. C. F. 
Winter, John G. 
Williams. R. C. 
Wilson, C. 
Wilhelrnsen. Chas. 
Wolf, John J. 
Wolfe, John 
Wolte, Paul 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



id, Chr. 
Abrahamson, E. 

Ammel, A. 
Amundsen, P. 
Anderson, J. -760 
Anderson, Chas. 
Anderson, A. -650 
Anderson, H.-1073 
Anderson, K. 
Anderson, Anton 
Anderson. Simon 
Austin, Martin 
Ayliffe, A. J. 
Baardsen, Edvard 
Bakke, M. 
Bauer, Frank 
Bergqulst, C. 
Berkelund, Rasmus 
Bertelsen, Alf. 
Bjerregaard, Christ. 
B.iorkgren, Otto 
Bodian, T. 
Blom, C. 
Blomberg, G. 
Brandt, W. 
Brown, Frank 
I '.urke. Thos. 
Brunstrom, U. A. 
Calberg, Oscar 
Calo, Augustin San- 
tos. 
Camp, J. 
Candela, Emll 
Cook, Harry 

E. D. 
Carlson, Walter 
Carlson, Eric 
Carlson, J. 
Carlson, A. G. 



I 'is.'V, J. 

Casson, H. 
Chevilore, Bolllon 
Chrlstensen, P. 
Chrlstenson, C. 
Christiansen, Fred- 
erick. 
Courtney, Ed. 
I 'aniels. C. 
Danielson, Gustaf 
Danielson, Axel 
Delslng, Ernst 
Denk, Adolf 
Doran. Eugene 
I mis, J. 
Eckland, Otto 
Elneff, R. II. 
Engberg, Oscar 
Friksen, Fred 
Eriksen, Eneval 
Eriksen, M. 
Fraser, James 

Frederlcksen, Hans 
Freusel. Adolf 
Geta, D. 
Ginstrom. F. 
GJerlow, Ingaard 
Gorver, John 
Gosling, W. 
Gronberg, Carl 
Guldberg, Randolf 
Gustafsen, K. E. 
Ilahner, F. 
Halversen. Halver 
Hansen. H. c. 
Hansen, O. R. 
Hansen, Geo. 
Hansen-1366 
Hardy. W. 



Heggum, L. 
Helin, I.. K 
Hermansen, A. 
Hllke, Carl 
Hogberg, Wm. 
Holin, J. 
Hollappa, Oscar 
Horsley, Robin 
Iverssen, Ole J. 
Jacobs, Geo. 
Jacobsen, A. L. 
Jacobsen, Oscar 
Jacobson, J. P. 

Jansen, J. Ed. 
Jensen, C. H.-569 

en, J. G. 
Johansen, Chris 
Johansen. W. 
Johanson-1489 
Johanson-1338 
Johansen, Axel 
Johansen, K. 
Johansen, Paul 
Johansson, Evert 
Johannesen, Jo- 
hannes 
Johndahl, Harry 
Johnson, J. W. 
Johnsen. A. 
Johnsen, John 
Johnson-1516 
Johnson, August 
Johnson. ( '.-] (Ml 

in, II. 
J. Hansen. P. J. 
Karlsson, Julius 
Kelly, P. 
Klemetilla, G. 
Kloperstrom, Wm. 
Knudsen, F. 
Knudsen. H, L. 
Kristoffersen. Karl 
KristofTerson, Olaf 
I .a f strom, A. 
Lambert, Edward 
Karsen, Peter V. 
I. arson. Ha 
l.aurin. J. O. 
Leahy, W. 
Lei sen, W. 

I iard. John 

Lewis, George H. 
Lie, A. H. 
Lie, A. 
Llnd, Carl 
Llnd, Oscar 
Lindholm, G.-69 I 
Marthinsen K. M. 
Matiasen, Nels 
McCarthy, John 
M. I lonald. N. 

McNiell, J. 
Meyer, G. 
Millard, W. G. 
Miller, James 
Miller. Harry 
Moore, William 
Moore, J. C. 
Morgan, Oskar 
Morrison, D. 
Murphy, Ti 
Neilson, H. M.-T.Vi 
Nelson, Jacob 
Nelson, Nels 
Nlckolsen, Axel 
Nickel, E. 
Nicmerph, Aug. 
Nilsen, S.-731 
Nilsen, I lie 
Nilsen, John 
Nilsen, Axel 
Nissen, James 
X'ordenholt, J. 
Norholm. K. B. 
Nylander, J. A. 
' if tiger, Ceo. 
i Hafsen, M. 
O'Laughlin. M 
Olsen, M.-B07 



Olsen, B. 
Olsen, L. 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olsen, Anton 
Olsen, John C. 
Olsen, Harry 
Olsen, Olaf H. 
Olson, Claus 
Olson, Oben 
Olson, Regnvald 
Olsson, Oscar 
Dim, J. 
Orling, Gus 
Oshlin, A. 
< 'sterling, E. 
Osses, A. 
Overland, T. 
]■:. 
• ■rson, O. 
Fa I sen, T. 
Passo, Andrew 
Patterson, A.-s7r. 
Paverson. 0. 
Pedersen. Hans 
Perry, R. 
Peterson, Richard 
Petterson, Chas. 
Piedvache ,Emil 
Pobus, L. 
Punnhagen, Lotds 
Quigly, T. 
Qulnn, Daniel 
Ramm, A. 
R. H.-597 
Rosen. E. H. 
Rosness, C. B. 
Roy. P. N. 
Rude, A.* M. 
Salomon, E . 
Samuelson, A. M. 
Samuelson. E. 
Schabethal, K. 
Scarabocia, M. 
Sedar. W. 
Simpson. W. 
Smith, Andrew 
Smith, Paul 
Soderman, E. 
Soils, Ingvald 
Solrud, J. 
Sorensen, Soren 
Staaf, L. 
Steckman. G. W. 
Steffenson, S. 
Stenberg. Y. 
Sterro, J. 
Storhelm, E. N. 
Stossle, C. 
Svendsen, B. H. 
Svendsen, Olaf 
Svenson, A.-1193 
Svensen. J. 
Swansen. F. I. 
Swansen, Chas. 
Swansen, Iver 
Thlngwall, E. 
Thorn, A. 
Thornton, Thomas 
Timm, K. 
Tornstrom, C. A. 
Turnbull. R. R. 
Turner, Fred 
Tuttle, C. D. 
Van Ree. W. 
Vogt, C. 
Terna, F. 
Vvpinkel, L. 
Walsh. J. 
Weger, P. 
Well, Charles 
Kennerlund, A. 
West, James 
Westcott. W. 
Wick, Ole 
Wight, U. 
Wind. J. 
Wlnhneskl. F. 
Yunker, Paul 



PORTLAND, OB. 



Ardelenu, Joan 

Andersen, N. 

Bregler, Friedrich 

Carnaghan. Wm. 

Clifford, Ellc 

Diederichsen, 
Heinr.-786 

Engebretsen, Mar- 
cus 

Fristrom, Ivar 

Hansen, Emil 

Hermanson, Albert 

Holstenborg, Olaf 

Ivers, John 

Janson, Oscar 

Johnson, Herman 

Jacobsson, John 

Johansen, Chris- 
1592 

Johansen. Vlv-1288 



Krane, Karl 
Klover, H.-463 
Lie, Henry 
McLauglin 
Magnusson-1147 
Malmquest, C. 
McGregor. John A. 
Moe. John 
Nelson, C. 
Robinson, John 

Herbert 
Roever, E. 
Sjostrom, S. E. 
Seibert, Henry 
Swensson, L. 
Soderman, Elis 
ITnger, Paul 
Valet, Erling 
Vanstone. Jack 
Westin. John 



EUREKA, CAI.. 



Andersen, Chas. 
Arversen, Arturt 
Boysson, B. C. 
Dldrlcks, Dlllef. 
Flenrle, Georges 
Forstrom, H.-500 
Gottberg. J.-622 
Hansen, Hans T. 
Hornberg, G. P. 



Larsen, Alfred 
Olsen, Anton 
Olsen, Arthur G. 
Olsen, H. 
Potujansky. R. 
Rohde, Robert 
Spreeslis. F. 
Torluk. Christian 
Walburg, oJhn 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



Anderson, Gilbert 
Baldvin, Melmer 
Hasel, Gustaf 
Hubraber, W. 
Johnson, H. 
Jorgensen, Ras- 
muss 



Lange, Max 
Larson, Werner 
Molden, Jakot 
Olber, Morsehins 
O'Harrow, Frank E. 
Pad. S. V.-478 
Sundberg, John 



Jorgensen. Rasmus Wiebroc, Charley 
Kearon, William 



DEMAND THIS LABEL 



133UED BY AUTHORITY OP 




WHEN PURCHASING OVERALLS, SHIRTS, OILSKINS, OR 
READY-MADE CLOTHING OF ANY DESCRIPTION! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 




LOOK FOR 

' 'Inion Label 

On Back of Each 

BUTTON 

International Seamen's Union of America 

BUTTONS 

For Sailors, Firemen, Cooks and 
Fishermen 

FIFTY CENTS EACH 

ED. ANDERSEN 

7 East St. SAN FRANCISCO 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



HOFFMAN CIGAR STORE 



Union-made Cigars and Tobacco. 
No Asiatics Employed. 



W. C. BERGIN, Proprietor 

Corner Hotel and Nuuanua Streets, 

HONOLULU, H. T. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Anderson, Fritz 
Abrahamson, A. 
Anderson-512 
Anderson, A. -1060 
Anderson, Ed. 
Anderson, Eskil 
Andersen, L.-1245 
Anderson, Axel 
Begovich, J. 
Berthelsen, A. 
Bernhardsen, C. 
Block, Hermann 
Blrkelund. R. 
Caiman, George 
Chlausen, J. 
Danielsen. D. 
Dishler, Peter 
Dlttmayer. Ch. 
Dyb=land, P Th. 
Eckman, G. A. 
Elfstrom, J. 
Farstad, K. E. 
Ehlers, Henry 
Hanson, J. F. & F. 
Hanston, Rob. 
Hansen, Henrik 
Hansen, Th. 
Hansen, Wm. 
Jacobson. John 
Jensen. P. 
Jugman, M. 
Janhunen, W. 



Kelly, Patrick 
Klinker, J. 
Kenna, P. J. 
Martin, John F. 
Mikkelsen. Alf. 
Murphy, P.-919 
Mietinnen, Adolf 
Moe, John 
Nilsen, M. P. 
Nilsen, N. A. 
Nielsen, N. F.-51. 
Olsen, Servin 
Olsen, Adolf 
Olsen, Emiel M. 
Peterson, John 
Pederson, Hans 
Paar, Ernst 
Palmer, James 
Pettersen-41.> 
Reynolds, Roy 
Salvesen, Sam 
Schwenke. Carl 
Sylvain, Cloa 
Swanson, Oscar 
Sorensen, M. 
Sillman, A. 
Svenson, John 
Swenson. James 
Thies, Harry 
Weissin, Charles 
Werner, Frederick 
Zambuera, M. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



Anderson, Alfred J 
Benhardsen. C. 
Buch, David 
Christianson, An- 
ton 
Davey, Chas-524 
Eckland, Otto 
Grant, Bert 
Harju, K. G. 
Hansen, Carl 
Hubsher, W. 
Hansen, Maurice 
Johansson, Knut 
Johanssen, O. 
Kunigk, A. 
Larsen, John 
Leupstadlus, Chas. 
Lie .Jens L. 



.Lindblom. Wolter 
Lowe, John A. 
Mooney, Thomas 
Myhrvold, Krist 
Nelson, I. H.-777 
Nissen, Jens 
Nordeland, George 

Olson, A-621 
Petterson, Oscar 
Petterson, Richard 
Ross, Ben 
Scharjen, John 
Schultz, Alex. 
Tham, Charles 
Thomas, Hamon 
Thomsen, Thomas 
Voss, Peter N. 



POST TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Allen, Frans 
Anderson-1119 
Currie. Jas. 
Edlund, J. A. 
Engebretsen, M. 
Gilhooly. H. 
Gottschalk, Max 
Hinner, G. 
Ingebretsen, Nil! 

407 
Jensen, Jens 
Jensen, Johan 
Jensen, V. E. 
Johansson. John 
Karlson, Julius 

Letters in the Office of the Fishermen's 
Union of the Pacific Coast and Alaska, 
San Francisco. 



Larsen, J. H. 

Lundberg, H. 

Mikkelsen, Julius 

Olsen, Sam 

Olson, O. A.-104 

Pearson, J. L. 

Perry, Ben 

Pledwache, Emlle 
l- Roman, Ted 

Schilling, C. 

Smith, J. A. 

Stone, M. 

Swenson, H. 
L. Thomsen, Thomas 



Fishermen's Lis 
Bjorstrom, Carl 
Ekstrand, Frank 
Gustafson, A. A. 
Jensen, Carl-268 
Johnson. Henry 
Jaeobsson, C. E. 
Mick, Caeciceo 



Nelson, John 
Knudtsen, Hans O. 
Sterens, Vint. 
Peter, Chas. W. 
Smith, Harry 
Vogt. Wilhelm 
Wilson, Harry 



Letters in the Office of the Marine 
Cooks and Stewards' Association, San 
Francisco. 



Ahlquist. F. W. 
Alverson, Edward 
Anderson, A. F. 
Aspengren, Theo- 

dor. 
Beardall, Robert 
Branford, chas. 
Campbell, Neil H. 
Cederholm, Victor 
Duke, Charles 
Gleason, Wm. 
Godley, G. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hanslng, W. 
Henryks, Bert 
Jensen, J. C. 
Jessamine. James 
Jorjrenson. Chas. 
Kendall. E. C. 
Kennedy, Thomas 
Kloot, Johannes 
McConaghy, Dav. 
McDonald, T. 
McLaughlin, Hugh 



McStay, Edward 
Miller. A. T. 
Mills, A. 
Nelson. Frank 
Olsen. Charles 
Palmer. John W. 
Pestell. Stanley 
Pons, Simon S. 
Purday. Harry 
Rlos, Manuel 
Roberts, Stanley 
Sannlno, Giuseppe 
Spldowsky, Theodor 
Turner, W. 
Veldon, Thos. 
Wlckstrom, John 
Wilson, Joe 
Wilson, J. T. 
Wilson, Peter 
Wllshart. Dav. 
Wolf, John 
Wolters, Geo. 
Young, Charles 



(Continued on Page 14.) 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE.) 

General Outfitters for Men and Boys 



Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m. ; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE. TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE-NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. 
Store closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 



1332 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



News from Abroad. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

WALTER EHRLICHMAN, 717 Pacific Ave. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



HOQUIAM, WASH. 



When in Port at Gray's Harbor Call 
at the 

Horseshoe Store 

HOQUIAM, WASH. 

For your Clothing, Furnishing Goods, 

Hats, Shoes, Rubber Boots 

and Oilskins. 

Honest Goods at Honest Prices. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing & Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in union-made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
WATER ST., FORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



OLD TACOMA CICAR STORE 

J. A. DAVID, Prop. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Tobaccos 
and Smokers' Articles 

Union Made Goods a Specialty. 
2319 NORTH 30th ST. 

OLD TACOMA, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



K. A. Johnson, last heard of in the 
schooner William Kendal, in 1902, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen 's 
Journal. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BROS. 




19 HERON ST., 



JEWELERS AND 
CHRONOMETER 
MAKERS. . . . 

Union Kacle 
Watches & Jewelry 
ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Chas. Eisenbeis 



F. W. Eisenbeis 



GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

EISENBEIS & SON 

Dealers in 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Crack- 
ers. Ships' Stores a Specialty. 
316 "Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co.(Inc ) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 
Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Port Townsend, Wash. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 
Dry Goods, Clothing', Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ing' s and Sailors' Outfits. 
315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank, 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND 

VEGETABLES. 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. - 



UNION HARDWARE STORE 

WM. GRIGGS 

404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 



Fine Pocket Knives, Tin 
Ware and Granite Ware. 



BARKLEY CYR CO. 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 
n6 SOUTH "G" STREET 

ABERDEEN, - WASH. 



W. C. JUDS0N 

EXPRESSMAN 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
Phone 693 ABERDEEN, WASH. 



When in Port at Aberdeen and looking 
for Union Goods call on 

L. FOGEL 

Watch for the Red Front, 24 Heron St. 

Headquarters lor Seamen's Outfits. 

Everything from a pair of Rubber Boot::, 

to a Tailor-made Suit. 



FOR UNION-MADE 

Tobacco and Cigars 

GO TO 

F. RINGSTAD 

Stand on Enerance to Union Office. 
ABERDEEN, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

James F. Russell, a nat've of Geneva, 
\. v.; Insi beard of aboul eighteen 
months ago, when going to Alaska, is 
inquired for. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 



The Japanese peace treaty passed the 
Privy Council at Tokio on CM. 4. 

Bubonic plague has broken out at 
Chinde, in Portugese East Africa. Sev- 
eral deaths are reported. 

The Swedish elections have placed 
rival parties in possession of the two 
houses of the Riksdag. A deadlock will 
result. 

The attempt to create agitation in 
favor of a Norwegian republic is said 
tn be finding no support from the coun- 
try. 

Admiral Togo, with a squadron of the 
best ships in the Japanese navy, will 
\i-dt European and American waters 

Some time next year. 

A tidal wave struck the village of 
Campechuela near Manzanilla, Cuba, on 
Oct. 4. Fifty houses were damaged, but 
no lives were lost. 

Field Marshal Kdhein Pasha, who was 
commander-in-chief of the victorious 
Turkish army in the war with Greece, 
died at Constantinople on October 6. 

Israel Zangwill, the Jewish author, 
lias declared his expectation that his 
plan for a Jewish autonomous state un- 
der a British protectorate will lie real- 
ized. 

Government reports show that the re- 
sult of the recent storm at Manila, I'. I.. 
is very serious. At least 200 natives and 
twenty-five Americans and foreign* rs 
were killed. 

It is said that Secretary of War 
Taft's visit to Tokio has resulted in an 
important understanding as the outcome 
of Japan's explicit disavowal of any de- 
signs on the Philippines. 

Fifty thousand Bengalis recently met 
in the Temple of Kalighat, Fas! Indies, 
and resolved to boycott all foreign goods 
and workmen, as a protest against the 
position of the Province of Bengal. 

John ('. Sanger, late of New York, 
lias been murdered in Sonera, Mexico. 
acording to a report brought to El 
Paso, Texas, by J. R. Seaton. Sanger's 
brother was also recently killed in So- 
nora. 

Official circles at The Hague expres:- 
doubt as to whether arrangements can 
be completed early enough for the sec- 
end peace conference to be held in 1906 
and do not expect it to assemble before 
1907. 

Following closely upon the publication 
of the text of the Anglo-Japanese treaty 
has come considerable talk of the possi- 
bility of an understanding between 
Great Britain and Russia for the main- 
tenance of peace in Central Asia. 

The rector of the Moscow University 
has closed that institution because of a 

recent mass meeting held in its precincts 

tit which a number of the participants 
were outside agitators totally uncon 
needed with the University. 

The presence of the British cruiser 

Fox tit Hodeida, Yemen province, Turk- 
ish Arabia, litis resulted in :i speedy set- 
tlement of .all the British claims in con- 
nection with the piratical attacks of 
Arabs on British dhows in the Red Sea, 

Andrew Dewet, nephew of I he fa- 
mous Boer, Christian Dewet, has been 

arrested ni his residence in a suburb of 
Windhoek, German Southwest Africa, 

with four liners, accused of plotting to 

overthrow (he German rule in Southwest 
A I'rici. i.ii reate a Boei n public, 

Professor Behring of the Pasteur In 
stitute, who believes he has disci rered 
i me for t uberculosis, w ill. upon demon 
st rat iug the value of bis remedj . i 

ipso facto 24,000 francs of hi 

from the l'rix Lacave, n erved by the 

a ademy for the conqueror of tul 

i , and the sum of 10,000,000 francs 

,i t apart for the bi ■ pui posi 

wealthy Brazilian. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



The eight-hour movement of the Inter- 
national Typographical Union contin- 
ues to make headway in various parts of 
the country. 

It is reported that the Chicago Fed- 
eration of Labor has expended $50,000 
since May in litigation arising from the 
teamsters' strike. 

Members of the committee are said to 
believe it easily possible to reduce the 
expenses of the Government Printing 
Office al least $1,000,000 a year. 

Switchmen in the employ of the Grand 
Trunk Railroad, at Chicago, 111., went on 
strike on September 129. Officials of the 
road took the places of the strikers. 

The strike of the drivers employe, 1 on 
United States mail wagons in New York 
City, which had been in progress for 
several weeks, was settled on September 
30. The strikers got all they demanded. 

Orders have been received by local of- 
ficials of the Carnegie Steel Company, 
at Columbus, O., to start the mills of the 
any in that city which have been 
idle for almost two years. About 500 
men will be given employment. 

The Supreme Court of Nevada on 
October 'J handed down a decision op- 
holding the constitutionality of the 
Eight-Hour law. The law was passed 
by the last Legislature and was contest - 
,.,'l by several of the large mine-owners. 

Because several printing establish- 
ments at Cincinnati refused to granl 
the demands of members of Typograph- 
ical Union No. :S for an eight -hour day, 
the union men employed in job printing 
establishments in that city have gone on 
strike. 

On October 2, 6000 carpenters in Bos 
ton, Mass., and vicinity had their wages 
advanced Us cents per day. The change 
became operative under a decision of 
Judge O. L. Wentworth of the Munici- 
pal Court as arbitrator, given about a 
month ago. 

A bulletin issued from the office of the 
International Typographical Union shows 
that 224 subordinate unions are now 
working on an eight-hour basis, or have 
arranged to do so not later than January 
1. 1906. Since September 8 such agree- 
ments have been signed in sixty six cities. 

six hundred and fifty Canal laborers, 
brought to Colon from Martinique, 
French West Indies, were landed at the 
former port against their will. I me 
hundred and fifty men were seriously 
beaten by the police. The laborers ob- 
jected to the unsanitary conditions on 
the Isthmus. 

The printers employed by the General 

Electric Company at Schenectady, N. 
V., went on strike recently to enforce 
their demand for an eight-hour day, with 
no reduction in pay. The company lias 
Offered to grant the reduction of hours, 

but insisted on reducing wages corre- 
spondingly. 

Preparations are under way for a con- 
certo. I movement on the part of the big 
railroad brotherhoods to secure a reduc- 
tion of the present working hours for 
railway employes all over the country. 
It is expected that the movement will 
assume definite form within the next 
two months. 

Organized labor of Muskagee, I. T., 
is opposing the proposed Stab; Constitu- 
tion to lie voted upon on November 7, on 
account of its "Open Shop" declaration, 
which reads as follows: " No person shall 
he denied or refused employment for tin' 
reason that he is or is not a member of 
any labor union." 

The United States District Attorney 
at New York has caused the arrest of 
eleven heads of manufacturing concerns 
of that city, on warrants charging them 
with having conspired, through the medi- 
um of an employers' association, to vio- 
late the Alien Contract Labor law by the 
importation of foreign workmen. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



SAWTELLE CLOTHING STORE 

H. A. SCHWARTZ, Prop. 



Headquarters for Seamen's Wearing Apparel. 
A complete line of Union Made goods in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats, Furnishing Goods, 
Oil Clothing, Rubber Boots, etc., etc. 



AGENTS FOR W. L. DOUGLAS 

$3.00 to $5.00, Union Made. 



SHOES 



Just around corner 
from Union Office. 



307 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



HERMAN SCHULZE 
CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F 

EUREKA. CAL. 

White Labor Only 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

J. A. ANTJEKSON, Proprietor. 



BOARD AND LODGING 

$5.00 PER WEEK. 
Neatest and Cleanest Place in Town. 



CORNER FIRST AND D STREETS. 



The Finest Beer Brewed on the Coast 
by the 

Humboldt Brewing Co. 

2996-3048 Broadway. 

Delivered and shipped to any part of 
the City and County on short notice. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG. 



Manufacturer of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottler and dealer in En- 
terprise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



SMOKED 

The "Popular Favorites," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigar* 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second St., EUREKA, CAL. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 



First-class Board and Lodging 

Reasonable Rates. 



Front Street, between C and D, 
EUREKA, CAB. 



The Eabi Lodgitg ta 

F. BORGES, Proprietor. 

NEATEST AND CLEANEST PLACE 
IN EUREKA. 

313 FIRST STREET. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 

OSCAR SWANSON, Proprietor. 
An old-time Union Man. 



Board and lodging,2 $5 per week. 
Single meals, 25c. Beds, 25c. and 50c. 



322 First Street, between D and E, 
EUREKA, CAB. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



5 



MORlTY OP 




X^cT^ 



From 
Maker to Wearer. 



The only Clothing Establishment on the Pacific Coast selling goods at less 
than Eastern Prices. 

JACOBS EN. CLOTHIER 

Manufacturer and Retailer 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS AND FURNISHINGS. 

812 and 814 FIRST AVENUE. SEATTLE, WASH. 




CLOTHING HOUSE 



Wbolesale and Retail 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 
Boots, Shoes 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits 
ALL UNION MADE GOODS 

Only Union Clerks Biaployed. 
SEATTLE, 'WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL StltOL 

navigation and nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH Principal 

Miss Helen C. Smith Assistant 

Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Naviga- 
tion. Successful Compass Adjuster. 
Ocean license unlimited. Steam and 
sail, American and British. 
472 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300 




SHOE & CLOTHING COMPANY 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 



615=617 First Ave. 

SEATTLE, WASH 



OPPOSITE 
TOTEM POLE 



THE "OUR HOUSE" CIGAR STORfc 

E. J. HABERER, Proprietor, 

151 WASHINGTON ST., SEATTLE. 



LETTER LIST. 



(Continued from Page 13.) 



Letters in the 
Cooks and 
Seattle, Wash. 

Brady, W. L. 

Brantford, Chas 

Fuller, E. E. 

HafTord, H. 

Harrlgan, E. 

Klool, Mr. 

Lewis, Miles 

Magnusen. Gus 

McCarthy, T. J. 

Menton, John 

O'Brien. P. 



Office of the Marine 
Stewards' Association, 

Pane, Fred 
Prell. H. 
Purdy, Harry 
Romero, S. 
Ruderman, Jacob 
Shreve. H. S. 
Smith. J. P. 
Vlnce. H. 
Waring, H. 
Yager. Ralph 
York. Geo. 



WHEN DRINKING BEER 




Carries a full line of Cigars, Tobaccos 
and Smokers' Articles. 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY. 

Telephone Ind. 118. 



When Purchasing from our Advertisers Always Mention the 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SEE THAT THIS LABEL 
IS ON THE KEG OR BOTTLE 



EUREKA. CAL. 



J. Perrv F. Hess 

UNION TRANSFER 
Baggage and Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES 
Office, 119 D Street 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDG. 
Phone Main 70. EUREKA, CAL. 

FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

OR 

SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKACHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D St., Eureka, Cal. 
WM. GOETZ. Prop. 



ASTORIA, OR. 



COLUMBIA RIVER 

Fishermen's Protective Union 

Headquarters. Astoria. Or. 

H. M. LOBNTSEN, Secretary, 

P. O. Box 138. 

The Reading Room Is open at all 

times to Members of the 

Sailors' Union. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



EXPRESS No. 101 



Stand near Sailors' Union Office. 

Also Furnished Booms. Call at Cigar 

Store, 201 Burnside St. 

P. P. JOHNSON, 

Phone Scott 5921'. Portland, Or. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



B0NNEY & STEWART 

UNDERTAKERS 
Third & Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a 
specialty. All orders by telephone 
or telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

C. J. BERENDES 

SOUTH SIDE HOTEL 

806 THIBD STREET, 
Between Berry and King Streets. 

The rooms are all newly furnished 
and the accommodations first class. 
Hoard and Lodging, $5 per week. All 
rooms single. 



ODD FELLOWS CEMETERY 

AT COLMA 

Near San Francisco 

Is now ready for interments 

Telephones West 806 and 
Church 5568 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

240 Montgomery St., Cor. Pine. 

Booms 14-15-16. Phone Main 5719. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



CITY FRONT DRUG STORE 

"W. L. BOURNS, Proprietor. 

10 Mission Street 
Phone Bush 810. San Prancisco. 

Careful attention given to Supply- 
ing Ships with Drugs. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 California Street, San Francisco. 



Guaranteed Capital and 

Surplus $ 2,600,098.42 

Capital actually paid up 

In cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, June 30, 1905... 37,738,672.17 



Board of Directors. 

John Lloyd, President; Daniel Mey- 
er, 1st "Vice-President; Emil Rohte, 2d 
Vice-President; Ign. Steinhart, L N. 
Walter, N. Ohlandt, J. W. Van Bergen, 
F. Tillmann Jr., and E. T. Kruse. 



A. H. R. Schmidt, Cashier; Wm. 
Hermann, Asst. Cashier; Geo. Tourny, 
Secretary; A. H. Muller, As6t. Secre- 
tary; W. S. Goodfellow. General Atty. 



California Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company 

Receives Savings Deposits of 
Ten Dollars and Upwards. 

IT PAYS INTEREST 

TWICE A YEAR. 

Eate — 

3 14 per cent on ordinary accounts 
3 6/10 per cent on term accounts 



CAPITAL &. SURPLUS, 
TOTAL ASSETS, - 



$ 1.521. 711. 98 
7,888,697.13 



Deposits may be made by P. O. 
Order, Wells-Fargo Money Order 
or Bank Draft 

Send for Pamphlets Descriptive 
of our Business 

OFFICES 

Cor. California and Montgomery Sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




THB WOLF OP ADVEESITY 
will get no mercy from the man with 
a snug bank account. The wolf is al- 
ways kept from the home of those who 
are economical and lay by every week 
a part of their earnings. Be it ever so 
little, it amounts to much at the end 
of the year, and with interest added 
makes your heart glad. Economy is 
wealth when the savings are deposited 
in a, strong, safe bank, which pays a 
good Interest rate. We pay 3% per cent 
on savings accounts, and 4 per cent on 
term deposits, both compounded semi- 
annually. 

Open Saturday evenings from 5 to 8. 

THB MARKET STBEET BANK, 

Seventh and Market Sts., 

San Francisco. 

Safe Deposit Boxes for rent from $2.50 per 

; ear upwards. 



California Undertaking Co. 

PRIVATE - RESIDENCE - PARLORS 



Devlin, Manager 
Lindscv, Secretary 



713 POST ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
EMBALMING A SPECIALTY 

OREN OAV ANO NIGHT TELEPHONE EAST 1203 



Frank J. Symmes, President Henry Brunner, Cashier 

Chas. Nelson, Vice-President F. F. Ouer, Asst. Cashier 

O. A. Hale, Vice-President Otto Ottesen, Asst. Cashier 

E. W. Runyon, Vice-President 

CENTRAL TRUST CO. OF CALIFORNIA 

42 Montgomery Street, Corner of Sutter Street, SAN FRANCISCO 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS PAID IN. - - $1,765,000.00 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

3*4% per Annum on Ordinary Deposits 3 6/10% per Annum on Term Deposits 

We sell Drafts and Money Orders on all cities 
in Norway, Sweden and Denmark at Cheapest Bates 
Our Bank in Norway is: Our Bank in Denmark is: 

Central Banken for Norge in Den Danske Landmands Bank in 

Christiania. Copenhagen. 

Our Bank in Sweden is: Skanes Enskilda Bank in Malmo. 
We write and speak tho Scandinavian languages. 
DIBBCTOBS: 
F. W. Dohrmann James Madison 
Frank J. Symmes 
Henry Brunner 
C. C. Moore 
W. A. Frederick 



Chas. Webb Howard 
Geo. C. Perkins 
Mark L. Gerstle 
E. A. Denicke 
O. A. Hale 



Gavin McNab 
Charles F. Leege 
J. M. Vance 
Charles Nelson 



John M. Keith 
E. W. Runyon 
G. H. Umbsen 
R. D. Hume 



FRANK 
BROS. 



Union-made Clothes 
Tailor-made Clothes 
Underwear V? Shoes 
Hats ^ s? ^ * 



Cor.KEARNYS SACRAMENTO STS. 

San Francisco. 



Political Printing 

ALL KINDS 

The James H.Barry Co. 

("The Star" Office) 

429 MONTGOMERY ST. 

Phone Main 358 

: GOOD WORK FAIR PRICES 



M. A. MAHER 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS 

Boots, Tobacco, Cutlery, etc. 

United Working-men's Shoes. 
Also Agency for the Orthopedic Shoe. 

206 East St., near Howard. 
Phone Red 4272. San Francisco. 



JOE HARRIS 

SEA-FARING MEN'S OUTFITTER 

Beady-Made Uniforms. 

Cap Making a Specialty. 

5 JACKSON ST., NEAB EAST, 

Tel. John 3501. San Francisco. 



EXPRESSING 



CHRIS 



Done by 

JORTALL 



Stand at Union Office, 
Southwest Corner East and Mission Sts. 



GREEN'S UNION STORE 

14 CLAY ST., one Block North of 
Market St., near Ferry. 

SAILORS' OUTFITS 

Best qi ality Rubber Boots and Oil 
Clothing, Shoes, Flannel Underwear, 
Hats, etc. 

ALL WITH THE UNION LABEL. 
We give you a square deal. 



D. EDWARDS 

4 MISSION ST., SAN FBANCISCO 
Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

We sell the kind of Goods you require. 
Extra Strong Hickory Shirts \ 
Best Overalls jUNION 

Good Lumber Shoes LABEL 

Stockton Flannel Underwear/ 
Uso a full line of Gentlemen's Furnish- 
ing Goods and Hats. book at our 
goods. You will be pleased. No trou- 
ble to show them. 



SMOKE 



RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



RED SEAL CIGAR CO 

324 BATTERY ST., S. F. 



Heavier 

Garments 
All Along the 
Clothes Line 



These brown October days — these 
days of chilly winds and bracing in- 
vigorating Fall weather — call for 
heavier wearing apparel. Overcoats 
and Underwear are prime factors in 
the preservation of health and com- 
fort. Heavier suits and trousers — 
all Union made, too — suits with the 
label sewed into the seams — Union 
men to wait upon you for Unlion 
garments. 

RUBBER 
TIME 

Rainy weather will soon be with 
us and with it comes the use of rub- 
ber boots and overshoes. Rubbers, 
to be good rubbers, must be new 
rubbers. Sailors will appreciate our 
kind of rubber boots. 



The Red Front 
Clothing Co. 

MARKET ST., pfe, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



STILL ON DECK 

ED. ANDERSEN 

7 EAST ST., NEAB MARKET 

Cigars, Tobacco and Notions 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY. 
LUMBER HOOKS. 



Union Boot and 
Shoe Store... 

Repairing Neatly Done 

C. LESTER 
12 Steuart Street. 



Domestic and Naval. 




The Allan line has suspended service 
to New York. 

Boston is to have a passenger steam- 
ship line to Glasgow, Scotland. 

Nineteen ships, with average tonnage 
of 9,000, were launched for the United 
States Navy during last year. 

A fleet of more than two score steam- 
ers, barks and schooners is now bound 
to Philadelphia, Pa., with sugar. 

The United States battleship Missis- 
sippi was launched from the Cramp yards 
at Philadelphia, Pa., on September 30. 

A new freight steamship line between 
Philadelphia and Boston is contemplated 
among shipping men. Two vessels have 
been chartered, it is reported. 

The steamer- Virginian of the Leyland 
line, which has been on the rocks below 
Quebec for a month, was successfully 
raised and brought to that port on Octo- 
ber 5. 

The Vigilant, the Canadian cutter, re- 
cently captured eighty-six nets belonging 
to Captain Hanson, of the tug Arrow, 
at Dunkirk, N. Y. Captain Hanson saw 
tho tug coming and ran south into Am- 
erican waters. No shots were fired. 

The schooner C. P. Dixon, from Phila- 
delphia for" Colon, Panama, while an- 
chored below Marcus Hook, N. Y., on 
October 1, was run into by two barges, 
in tow of the tug Lenape. The Dixon's 
figurehead was smashed, and she sus- 
tained other damage. 

The steamer Colonia, which is laying 
1 he Commercial Company's new cable 
from Ganso to Ireland, reported on Oc- 
tober 1 from latitude 53 degrees 17 min- 
utes N., longitude 27 degrees 3 minutes 
E., that she had laid out 1568 nautical 
miles. 

True bills have been returned by the 
Grand Jury of Chicago against the own- 
ers of the steamer City of Traverse, 
charging them with keeping a common 
gambling house. This boat has been 
known for three months as Chicago's 
"floating pool-room." 

The owners of the schooner Job H. 
Jackson, which was sunk in the lower 
Chesapeake Bay recently by the steamer 
Bayport, have libelled the Bayport in 
the Federal Court at Norfolk, Va., for 
$ 1 12,000 damages. The Bayport is now 
in drydock at Newport News. The 
Jackson is to be raised. 

A new, though roundabout, steamship 
service between Southampton and New 
York was inaugurated on September 30 
by the sailing from Southampton of the 
Royal Mail Steam Packet Company's 
steamer Tagus, which, after calling at 
West Indian ports, will proceed to New 
York. The service will be fortnightly. 

I,'( ar-Admiral Kobley D. Evans, with 
part of the North Atlantic fleet, has re- 
turned to New York, and will prepare 
fur the formation of a fleet of eight bat- 
tleships, four armored cruisers and the 
11 sw protected cruiser, Charleston, which 
will welcome Prince Louis of Batten- 
berg, who is to arrive at that port be- 
tween November 2 and 7. 

With the arrival of the new dredge of 
the Maryland Dredging Company in the 
Delaware River, work has begun under 
;ill three contracts given out by the Gov- 
ernment for deepening the channel. 
Work is now being done between New 
Castle, Del., and the Pennsylvania state 
line. The three contracts must lie com- 
pleted by the end of 1906. 

Passengers arriving at New York on 
the Cunard liner Lucania, from Liver- 
pool, told of sighting a monster iceberg 
stranded on the banks of Newfoundland. 
For more than a fortnight the big berg 
has been Htainlingf on the same spot, un- 
moved by wind or wave. Officers of the 
Lucania declared that they also sighted 
the big berg on the hist eastward pas 
sage. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



Though "Love is blind," as poets sing, 
A cynic bachelor wight 

ires thai marriage is the thing 
That will restore its sight. 



The Cause of It.— Cholly— " I admit 
it frequently takes me some time to 
lp my mind, but — " 

Miss Pepprey— "Ah, naturally. You 
must lose time trying to locate it." 



No Eoom For It. — Citiman — "I don't 
suppose you ever had smallpox or ty- 
phoid out in Swamphuret. " 

Subbubs— "No, indeed; there wasn't 

any room for it. The place is too full 
of malaria. 



The Old Stone.— Hicks— "There's a 
sort of grin called 'bloodstone,' isn't 
there? Ever hear of it?" 

Dunn (the bill collector)— "No, but 
I frequently hear of the stone you can't 
get any blood out of. ' ' 



Up to Her.— "John!" whispered 
.John's wife, "I'm thoroughly convinced 
there's a burglar downstairs." 

"Well, dear," replied the husband, 
sleepily, "1 hope you don't expert me 
to have the emnage of your convic- 
tions. " 



lie Had One. — Prof essor— " We know 

that heat expands, and we also know, 
Mr. Smart, that cold contracts, do we 
not?" 

Mr. Smart (hoarsely)—"! guess so; 
but I'll bet it doesn't contra, t itself as 
much as we contract it." 



Foiled.— Mr. Phoxy— " T was going to 
ask you to try this little trick; Multiply 
the years of your age by three, sulitract 
twenty-one from the total, and what 's the 
answer?" 

Miss Kute— "You should be able to 
guess the answer at once. ' ' 

Mr. Phoxy— "Yes? What is it?" 

Miss Kute— "None of your business." 



A Hint.— Mr. X. Entrick— " See here, 
young man, all the other young fellows 
who called to see Mabel before yon, 
never stayed later than 10 o'clock 
and—" 

Mr. Meanwell— "Yes, sir." 

Mr. X. Kid rick— "And I was going to 
say, if you don't stay until 11 o'clock at 
least, I'll take it that your intentions are 
no more serious than theirs were." 



LUNDSTROM'S 



$2.50 Hats 



UNION 
MADE 

Made by 

PACIFIC COAST 

HAT WORKS 

1458 Market St., opposite Central 
Theater, and 605 Kearny Street. 



Countrv Orders Solicited. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 



Bagley's 
Lime Kiln 
Club 



-~to»*< tt Author^ olttK"- T*l 




Established 
Over 

30 Years 
on the 
Pacific 
Coast 



I£v©ry Packag© bear© 
the Union Label 




\M0nmade 



Clothing 







•sk'J 



« 



I55UE0 BY AUTHORITY V 



We are one of the pioneers to adopt the union 
label of the Garment Workers. We manufacture all our clothing in 
our own workshops, and all of it is made by union men. Ours are 
the only thoroughly union clothing stores in San Francisco. 

Other stores have only a few union-made lines to show union men 
when they call. But everything Is union-made in our store. 

In purchasing here you buy direct from the makers at a saving 
of middlemen's profits. 

Ready-to-wear suits and overcoats $10.00 to {35.00. 

Made-toorder suits and overcoats $10.00 to $45.00. 

Garments can be purchased in either one of our two stores. 



TWO LARGE 
STORES 



S. N. WOOD & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Cor. POWELL, A. ELLIS 
AND 740 MARKET 



James A* Sorensen Co. 

WATCHMAKERS, JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 




103 to 111 SIXTH STREET, 

Telephone Jessie 2821 



Below Mission. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Eyes 






All Watch Repairing Warranted for two years 
Tested Free by an Expert Optician. 

ALARM CLOCKS REDUCED TO 45 CENTS. 

Open Evenings till 8 p. m. Saturdays, 10 p. m. 

THE BIG JEWELRY STORE 



SMOKERS 



See that this labei (in light blue) 
appears on the box from which 
you are served. 



Issued by Authority oi the Cigar Makers' International Union of Arner« 

Union-made Cigars. 

U,hl$ (CCllif IfS, Inn the Cwjafi coined inthu bo* hivf bwn mjd« by a FlBl-QcS WOI 

jMLMKROf rHCClGAA MAKERS' I NUftNATlOHAl UNION d Amenta »r> oroarwatKW OevuteO tTj the ad 

vencf MM of the MORAi MATERIALS INTQLECIUAL WlilAflt Of TUC CRAfT. Therefore *t (Kanmend 

try ie CiQjrs to ill smoker-, throughout ifw world 

All inliingenMm upon Uui Libel mil be pu rusted ««ydi*g to l*w 



f! W fiUkUt*. f 



Pfradent, 

HIV e/Amemm 



*mt*8^?£&'*!m,<s^y*^***»^ &*£,*&*, < ** i_as% ■ . «« ^ %*•* ,<«■•». «*** * 



PATRONIZE UNION INDUSTRY 

SHOKE UNION-MADE CIGARS THAT BEAR 
THE ABOVE LABEL 



(Otherwise known as SAM.) 

808 THIRD STREET 

Between King and Berry Sts., San Francisco. 

GENTS', YOUTHS' AND BOYS' CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing Goods. Hats, Caps. Trunks, Valises. Hags, etc.. Boots 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing of all kinds. Everything strictly 
UNION MADE. Seamen's outfits a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at the lowest market price give me a call 
Do not make a mistake — LOOK FOR THE NAME AND NUMBER. 



Taylors Nautical School 




506 



BATTERY STREET 

COR. WASHINGTON ST. 



Opposite 

U. S. Custom House SAN FRANCISCO 



Oldest School on Pacific Coast, Largest 
and best equipped private Nautical School 
in the United States. Graduates prepared 
for the American and British Merchant 
Marine Examinations. Warrant officers of 
the United States Navy prepared for ex- 
amination for commissioned officers. Spec- 
ial course for cadets entering the United 
States Naval Academy and American Mer- 
chant Marine. 

Taylor's Modern Navigation, a book for 
both young and old navigators, is now in 
the Library of every Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship, In many Universities, and is highly 
recommended by many noted navigators. 
Send for circulars and testimonials. 



Moving Sales at Hale's 

YOUR SAVING TIME NOW. 

The week just passed has marked 
important progress. The walls 
of the present store have been 
broken thru. 

And stairways and elevator shafts 
are being completed to join the 
new six-story annex to the Mar- 
ke't-street building. 

Exteriorly the new store is prac- 
tically finished. Nearly twice as 
much room. Already we can 
see the added opportunities it 
will give us_ to make a better 
store for you. 

Already certain departments are 
moving reserve stocks to new 
quarters, 6th floor. Moving is 
cif no benefit to merchandise, so 
to save handling and conse- 
quent damage as well as lighten 
labor, many departments have 
made remarkable values so that 
you will do the moving for us. 

Open at 9. Closed at 6 every day. 

MARKET ST., NEAR SIXTH 
San Francisco 



Union 
Clothing Store 

A COMPLETE STOCK OF 

Sailors' and Firemen's Clothing 
and General Supplies. 



ERNEST COLBY 

17V6 Steuart Street, 
Bet Market & Mission. San Francisco 




oris 



TheTarpest first class 
tailorindestablishment 
on the Tacif ic Coast 

iivstn 



this 




label 



Suits to'order 
from $J(J 00 up 

Trousers to order 
from$gOO up 

Samples apd Self -Measurement Blanks 
free by mail 

•^CHARLES LYONS 
VS/ LondonTailor ft 

721 Market g 122 Keanpr s? 



SCOTTY'S MILWAUKEE 
SWEATERS & JACKETS 

Have stood the test against all 
competitors. 

Lake Faring' Men All Know It. 

SWEATERS SENT BY 
MAIL FOB 93.00 
Beware of Imitations. 

WILLIAM LISLE 

"SCOTTT" 

111 Menomenee St., Milwaukee, Wit. 




for the seafaring people of the world. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



Vol. XIX. No. 4. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1905. 



Whole No. 940. 



BRITISH TRADE-UNION CONGRESS. 



Membership, and Measures Adopted. 

Compulsory Arbitration Again Defeated. 



THE Thirty-eighth Annual Congress of the 
Trade- Unions of the United Kingdom was held 
in the Victoria Hall, Hanley, on Monday, Sep- 
tember 4, and five following days. The Congress was 
presided over by the Chairman of the Parliamentary 
Committee, Mr. James Sexton, General Secretary of 
the National Union of Dock Laborers. The standing 
orders of Congress provide that it shall consist of 
representatives of trade-unions who are actually 
working at their trade at the time of their appoint- 
ment, or are permanent paid officials of the unions 
they represent. 

This qualification of delegates to the Congress was 
adopted about ten years ago. The circumstances 
which led to the adoption of the rule that delegates 
must be actual workers at their trades or permanent 
paid officials of their respective unions, and the effect 
thereof, may not be without interest to American 
trade-unionists. Prior to the adoption of this rule, 
the Congress annually contained a number of delegates 
who, although retaining membership in their organiza- 
tions, had ceased to work at the trades they repre- 
sented. In many instances these delegates occupied 
public positions, some as Members of Parliament, 
others as members of local governing boards, etc. In 
the nature of things these, delegates exercised an in- 
fluence in the proceedings of the Congress that was 
out of proportion to their nominal standing as repre- 
sentatives of certain trades. It naturally transpired 
that the influence thus wielded did not always accord 
with the proper purposes of the Congress. In a word. 
much of the time of the Congress was occupied in dis- 
cussion of a purely political character, to the exclusion 
of trade-union questions. This diversion of interest 
resulted in great dissatisfaction and wasteful bicker- 
ing among the delegates. The rule in question was 
therefore introduced in the Congress as the only rem- 
edy for the evil which had developed. The opponents 
of the proposed qualification argued that its adoption 
would work a denial of the trade-unions ' right to pass 
upon the qualifications of their representatives. This 
objection was met with the reply that the Congri ss 
must be vested with authority to make such regulations 
as might be found necessary to conserve its own safety 
and efficiency. The further objection was raised that 
the adoption of the rule under discussion would result 
in barring out a number of men who had theretofore 
distinguished themselves by devotion to the cause of 
trade-unionism, as well as by great service to the Con- 
gress itself. At this point the names of several dele- 
gates well known throughout the world were men- 
tioned as prospective victims of the new rule. This ap- 
peal to the personal sentiment of the delegates toward 
certain of their confreres might have resulted in the 
defeat of the measure, but for the attitude taken by 
the more prominent of the delegates whom it was pro- 
posed to legislate out of the Congress. John Burns, 
at that time a powerful and conspicuous figure in the 
deliberations of British trade-unionists, espoused the 
proposed rule. Burns was then, as now, a Member of 
Parliament, and had for years previously ceased to 
work at his trade of engineer. lie, however, declared 
his approval of the qualification under discussion, upon 
the ground that, while it would debar himself and 
others of like disposition from participation in future 
sessions of the Congress, it would also debar a larger 
number of men who, in the absence of such a rule, 
would enter the Congress for ulterior or personal pur- 



poses, rather than for the good of the labor movement. 
For his own part, Burns declared, while he regretted 
to sever his official connection with the Congress, he 
freely recognized the wisdom and necessity of that 
course and as freely pledged his continued interest in 
the cause of organized labor. The rule was adopted, 
and, so far as is known, has given entire satisfaction 
to the British trade-unionists. The Congri. ss has been 
freed from political agitation, while it has suffered no 
loss of loyalty on the part of those former delegates 
who, having quit the field of active trade-unionism, 
have carried their faith in that institution into other 
spheres of activity. 

Trade-unions may send to the Congress one delegate 
for every 2,000 members or fraction thereof, but many 
of the larger societies do not send the full number 
of delegates to which they are entitled. Voting on 
important questions is by card, on the principle of 
one vote for every 1,000 members represented. 

The analysis into groups of trade's given below 
shows the composition of the Congress, and the trade 
groups represented are compared with the correspond- 
ing figures for the Congress of 1904: 



o 
on 


^5 

o S 


° 6 ±i 

ZD £ 


"'I £ 

6-5.2 


o 

ON 


.A 

s 




No. of 

Organi- 
zations. 




rt 

H 

a. 

3 
O 

6 



tn - - w vo 


CONO-1 


m 00 oo 


VO m 


" 


ON 

vO 


moO <* •« 


m On « •* W 


Oco o* 


-? 


" 


* 


cow*n 


OfCO-OO 


2-- 


W ON 


•* # - 






N VO «£> - 

O m in N 

M m-O OO 

oo f*» mvo 

M m. 


r^ w In m 

q t^ q in £ 

N NO ■* f*loo" 
vo m in w vo 


On O m 

•"■-*•* 

moc \D 

o. w~ - 
^. m 




moo 
q o 

Onto' 
m rr, 


3 

6 


ON N vo M 

W OO m w 


t-»vo ■* On •* 
m On ci m m 


(XnN 


"? 


t**vO 




m O m m 


« in C O 


M«0> 


N OtN 


■ 



.-3 — 13 

■no! 



-/ s 



ton J 2 

=5.5.5! 



2 2 



• </>o 



'. to "J 
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The number of organizations accounted for in the 
foregoing statement is 154, but allowing for the num- 
ber of distinct societies included in federations, mem- 
bers of about 218 separate trade-unions attended the 
Congress as delegates this year out of a total of about 
1,166 unions in existence. The membership repre 

sented, however, comprise. I about three -fourths of the 
total membership of all trade unions. The number of 
organizations represented this year Was five less than 
in 1904, but the total membership was greater by 
149,082. This increase is more than account..! for by 
the inclusion in 1905 of the Amalgamated Society of 
Engineers and the Durham .Miners' Association, which 
were not represented last year. The glass trades in- 



creased their representation, and the Postoffice em- 
ployes and miscellaneous unions continued to show 
an increased membership. The decrease in the mem- 
bership of the building group is largely owing to the 
Operative Plasterers' Society and the Associated So- 
ciety of Carpenters and Joiners not being represented 
this year. The general labor group of trades again 
showed some falling off in membership. 

Among the principal industrial subjects on which 
the Congress passed resolutions were: Restriction of 
the hours of labor to eight per day for miners and 
work-people generally; certificates of competency for 
persons in charge of steam engines and boilers; 
amendment of the law in relation to trade-unions and 
industrial disputes; amendment of the Mines Regula- 
tion Act, the Factory and Workshop Acts, the Simp 
Clubs Act, the Workmen's Compensation Acts, and 
the Truck Act; the wages and general conditions of 
labor of Governmenl employes; general old-age pen- 
sions; abolition of the character note system; im- 
proved housing accommodation for working people; 
investment of trade-union funds; municipal trading 
and banking; uniform compulsory hours of closing 
for shops; special courts for trial of claims for wages 
due, etc.; measures to prevent the dismissal of work- 
men for being members of trade-unions; use of trade- 
union labels on manufactured goods; nationalization 
of mines, railways and canals; and abolition of the 
privilege cab system at railway stations. 

A resolution in favor of compulsory arbitration in 
trade disputes was rejected by a majority of 92,000 
votes; the majority at the previous Congress was 
486,000. 

The resolution favoring compulsory arbitration was 
strenuously opposed by the miners, who denounced the 
project with forceful arguments. The miners charged 
the small organizations, who were the principal sup- 
porters of compulsory arbitration, with being nar- 
row-minded and adherents of an ancient spirit of caste, 
which prevented them from seeing the benefits to be 

derived through strong and powerful organization, 
and thus being unable to fight their employers by 
virtue of their own inherent strength. 
The Eight-Hour resolution was opposed by Thomas 

Ashton, of the Textile Workers, who argued that an 
eight-hour day in the textile industry would make it 

impossible for the British manufacturers to compete 

and hold their own in the world's markets. Mr. Ash- 
ton asserted thai at present tour-fifths of the British 
textile product was sold abroad. 

A resolution favoring the continuance of free trade 

was adopted by 1,253,000 to 26,000 votes. 
Delegates representing the American Federation of 

Labor, the Cooperative Union, the General I'Y.l.i:. 

tion of Trade-Unions, and the Labor Representation 
Committee attended the Congress and delivered ad- 
dresses-. Two Brit]sh delegates were elected to attend 
the Annual Convention of the American Federation 
of Labor, to be held in December next. 

The voting by the Congress for members of the 

Parliamentary Committee for the ensuing year result- 
ed in representatives of the following organizations 

being elected: Northern Counties Weavers, Boiler 

Makers and Iron and steel Shipbuilders, Cotton Spin 
ncrs. Shipwrights, Gas Workers and (ioneral Laborers, 

Railway Servants, Miners' Federation, Boot and Shoe 

Operatives, Dock Laborers, Brassworkers, London 
Compositors, and Amalgamated Engineers. Mr. W. 

1 . Steadman, Barge Builders' Society, was elected 
Secretary of the Committee, Mr. D. C. CummingB, 
representative of the Shipbuilders' Society, was ap- 
pointed by the Committee as Chairman for the enau 

ing year. 

It was decided thai Dexl year's Congress should be 
held at Liverpool. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Substitute for the Compass. 



As "true as the needle to the pole" is a 
trite comparison, but the scientific world un- 
derstands well that it means very little. The 
needle, in the first place, does not seek the 
geographical pole at all, nor does it point 
steadily toward any one region, but varies in 
its direction with place and time. Besides 
this, far from being true, the needle's affec- 
tion is easily distracted — a chance bit of 
magnetic iron, close by, will draw it more 
powerfully than the eoncentrated pull of the 
earth's magnet ism. In these days of iron 
ships the deviation of the compass has become 
increasingly hard to compute. And even 
when the sailor knows theoretically how much 
his needle is to be expected to swerve from 
the meridian in any part of the voyage, the 
magnetic characteristics of the ship change 
with locality, and the navigator is constantly 
passing into regions of different intensity of 
arth's magnetic attraction. The useful- 
ness of the original computation is thus con- 
stantly impaired by distance in time or 

ph Navigators who have been casting 

about for some substitute for this capricious 
instrument, or for some standard by which 
its accuracy may be checked or tested from 
time to time, have been experimenting with 
a swiftly rotating fly-wheel, using the prin- 
ciple that such a body tends to place itself 
with its axis always in the same direction in 
space. A correspondent of the Evening Post 
New York, September 8), writing from 
Washington, D. C, on this subject, tells us 
thai it is proposed to maintain in rotation, 
by means of an electric motor, a heavy-rim- 
med wheel, mounted in gimbals. He says: 

When the rate of speed amounts to three 
thousand revolutions per minute, or there- 
abouts, the plane in which the ring revolves 
will maintain itself constantly in one direc- 
tion. If the navigator starting from the port 
of New York were to set the wheel of the 
gyroscope revolving in the plane of the merid- 
ian, it would continue to revolve in that 
plane with great regularity. An ordinary 
compass could be compared at intervals with 
the fixed direction marked out by the wheel 
of the gyroscope, and so the error of the 
compass could be ••checked up" from time 
to time. This is the conservative prediction, 
making the gyroscope useful as an auxiliary. 
to secure greater accuracy. Some observers 
go further and predict that it will displace 
the compass altogether. The greater prob- 
ability, as in so many other things, is that 
a compromise result would follow, each 
method having its own field. 

At the port of New Yoik, for example, the 
gyroscope could be set by astronomical in- 
struments of the greatest refinement so as to 
point to the North Pole with absolute accu- 
racy. As the ship advanced this device would 
not point to the North Pole from new posi- 
tions, hut it would always give a line show- 
ing the direction between New York and the 
North Pole, which, with a knowledge of the 
convergence of the meridians, would allow 
of its use for direct comparison with the 
compass in any other place, and would thus 
everywhere afford the navigator a fixed 
direction with which to work. This device 
would lie mounted on gimbals, and a card 
like a compass-card placed by its side, on 
which zero, instead of being the magnetic 
north, would be this fixed line established at 
tlie poll of departure. 

This is not merely a theoretical proposal. 
Tests have been undertaken at the instance 
of the German naval authorities on board 
the warship Undine lasting two days, and 
made with a view to determining with what 
accuracy the gyroscope shows alterations in 
the ship's course, and how well it would 
stand violent concussion. To quote again: 



On the first day the ship described a large 
number of curves to ascertain whether the 
instrument would deviate from its original 
position, and whether it would accurately 
show the angles of alteration in direction. 
With the assistance of carefully placed eon- 
trolling buoys, no error was detected. On 
the contrary, several small errors' in the 
position of the buoys were discovered by 
means of the gyroscope. A number of man- 
euvers were then executed with the machin- 
ery and big truns to ascertain the effect of 
concussion and vibration. These movements 
consisted of sailing at forced draft and then 
suddenly reversing the engines, and of firing 
shots from the heaviest guns and in such 
a position that the gyroscope received the 
heaviest shock, so that the severest possible 
concussions were brought to bear upon the 
instrument. The greatest vibration and con- 
cussion that could >h'<-\w on a vessel of the 
Undine type were proved to have no effect 
whatever on the apparatus. 

The gyroscope was then carefully set with 
the assistance of a series of buoys, and for 
four hours the most eccentric course was 
followed. By means of intermediate buoys 
and a set destination it was proposed to dis- 
cover any possible errors in the indications 
of the apparatus during the time of trial. 
At the end of this trial no error could be dis- 
covered. It. is therefore presumable that, 
under less favorable circumstances and in a 
longer period, say eight hours, no appreci- 
able error could occur which would render 
the apparatus unreliable. A comparison of 
the gyroscope with the amplitude compass 
was then made. Upon comparison with an 
accurate deviation tabic, errors up to 1.5 
degrees were discovered, apparently attrib- 
utable to the gyroscope. The test which was 
immediately applied showed, however, that 
this was not, the case, but that the co-efficients 
of deviation had altered, presumably on ac- 
count of the previous severe vibration and 
concussion. It was possible, by means of the 
gyroscope, to discover errors in the compass. 

The result of these tests, our consul re- 
in its. was the acknowledgment by disinter- 
ested parties that no inaccuracy arises in the 
instrument on account of the earth's rota- 
tion, that the angles of changes of course are 
shown with the greatest exactitude, and that 
shocks of vibration which would render a 
compass inaccurate or even useless have no 
effect upon it. — Literary Digest. 



Employment of Children. 



I'nited States Consul Muench, of Plauen, 
Germany, referring to a former report on cer- 
tain new legislation in Germany tending to 
prohibit infant labor and exploitation, says 
that a sufficient test of the law has been had 
to judge of its fruits, and that these are not 
regarded very favorably. The consul says : 

A sufficient test of the new legislation has 
been had to judge of its fruits, and these are 
not spoken of in the most enthusiastic strain. 
Optimists had believed that infant labor need 
only to be forbidden to be also prevented. That 
such has not been the result in this instance 
is now frankly admitted by the German press. 
It is pointed out that while the control of child 
employment in factories, restaurants, and all 
public or semi-public works presents compara- 
tively small difficulty, such control in case of 
"home work" becomes well-nigh impossible. 

To be sure the inspectors, and other officials 
intrusted with the enforcement of this law, 
have sought and received the hearty co-opera- 
tion of the school authorities in their endeavor 
tvi locate cases of absence and their cause; 
but hesitancy is naturally felt to practice a 
system of espionage upon the movements of 
children in their own domicile, and it is opined 
that since the home employment of the child 
and its consequent withdrawal from the bene- 



fits of scholastic instruction is generally caused 
either by dire necessity or a willful disregard 
of the best interests of the child on the part of 
the parent, a close inquiry into the reasons for 
non-attendance is more apt to develop a species 
of deception and prevarication on the part of 
both parent and child than to evoke truthful 
statements of the real causes of such absence. 
It is feared, also, that a systematic course of in- 
vestigation into the private home life of the 
child would tend to shake that confidence be- 
tween scholar and teacher which is looked up- 
on as an element of value in pedagogy. 

Serious doubt exists whether the benefits un- 
der the new law have not been wholly offset by 
its baleful consequences. While it must be 
admitted that child labor in the factories has 
become easily controllable, it is charged that 
the very exclusion of children from these 
plants has called into being numerous other 
phases of infant labor. Thus, for instance, the 
industrial commission at Dantzig reports that 
the home workers engaged in doing piecework 
for a wooden-ware factory employed not less 
Hum 489 children, aged from 6 to 14 years, 
at their homes at the work of platting cane for 
chair seats. Out of 317 children attending 
school. 135, viz, 42 per cent, were set to work 
a Iter 8 o'clock p. m. nor did any of them enjoy 
their freedom during the recess of two hours 
at noon or of one hour in the afternoon. Thus 
the inhibition against factory work resulted to 
Ihese unfortunates in the opening up of a far 
more cruel and deleterious employment. 

It is strenuously urged, and w . 
son, that in order to fully suppress this evil 
it will first of all be requisite to remove the 
temptation to this abuse by offering opportun- 
ity for parents to keep their young children 
at school and to do without the earnings now 
exacted from them. 

Help is also expected from further legisla- 
tion in the direction of curtailing all such 
home employment of immature children. Most 
of all, though, it is insisted that the induce- 
ments to parents toward keeping their minor 
children at school during school age should be 
greatly increased, and that not only the act lal 
ly indigent, but the entire working classes, 
should be accorded free schooling for their 
children. The end of sociological legislation 
is not thought to be fully attained until it 
lights the way of childhood, as it even now 
smooths the path of old age. Thus it will be 
noted that elements are ever active in this 
country making for a broadening and deepen- 
ing of the national schemes for patriarchal 
care of those not wholly able to take care of 
themselves, and the day is evidently not far 
distant when Germany will be able to boast 
of a public school system almost a.s free as our 
own. 



At the May session of the Paris Academy 
of .Medicine a treatise, by Doctor Fournol, rec- 
ommending hypodermic injections of sea 
water against tuberculosis, attracted much at- 
tention. Doctor Fournol, together with anoth- 
er physician, has prepared a sea-water serum, 
which possesses the property of increasinir the 
blood pressure. lie treated twenty-four pa- 
tients at a Paris hospital with it. Some of 
these suffered from recent tuberculosis of the 
lungs, others for old tuberculosis of the bones. 
In all cases a distinct improvement was notice- 
able in the local as well as in the general 
condition. It is stated in German papers that 
the results appeared so important to the mem- 
bers of the Academy that it was resolved to 
notify the tuberculosis commission, so as to 
make further experiments. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



On the Atlantic Coast. 

(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions.) 



New YorK Labor Statistics. 



The report of the New York State Commis- 
sioner of Labor for the quarter ending June 
30, 1905, confirms the prevalent opinion that 
the present year has so far been a compara- 
tively prosperous one in trade and business. 
From returns made to the Department from 
trade-unions embracing a membership of ap- 
proximately 100,000, it is shown that the 
average monthly number of unemployed mem- 
bers during the quarter was only 151 per 1,- 
000, as compared with 202 last year and 168 
in 1902. At the beginning of May the num- 
ber of idle men among the wage-earners in 
the State was only 118 per 1,000, as com- 
pared with 153 per 1,000 in 1902, while at 
the beginning of July the proportion was 91, 
as against 145 in 1902. 

The building trades were particularly act- 
ive during the quarter. In the months of 
April, May and June work was begun on 7,- 
316 buildings in New York City, as compared 
with 5,164 a year ago. The number of build- 
ings completed during the quarter was 4.673, 
as compared with 3,455 a year ago. These 
figures, however, fail to convey an adequate 
idea of the extent of building operations now- 
going on in New York City. According to 
the report, the estimated cost of projected 
buildings for which plans were approved and 
permits issued in the second quarter of 1905. 
attained the enormous sum of $78,417,896. As 
a matter of fact, the cost of buildings project- 
ed in the first six months of the present year 
in New York City exceeds the cost of these 
projected in the entire twelve months of 1902 
or 1903. In the other large cities of the 
State also building operations are shown by 
the report to be well above the average, al- 
though, of course, conducted on a much small- 
er scale than in New York City. In Buffalo, 
for instance, the cost of buildings authorized 
in the second quarter of 1905 was $2,370,237 ; 
in Rochester $1,846,125, and in Syracuse 
$669,263. 

On the subject of immigration the report 
says, in effect, that because of the close rela- 
tions between European working people who 
have settled in this country and those abroad, 
an unusual demand for labor here is almost 
automatically satisfied through the migration 
of additional European laborers. To quote 
the report: 

Thus it is that American prosperity is quickly re- 
flected in the statistics of immigration. In the second 
quarter of 1905 the number of alien arrivals in the 
port of New York broke all records, having attained 
the figure of 294,381, as against 202,099 last year, and 
274,507 two years ago. The largest contingent of im- 
migrants, as usual, comes from South Italy, and now 
amounts to a small army — 95,025 persons, or 32 per 
cent, of the total. Polish immigration also increased 
largely, and assumed the second place with 33,438 ar- 
rivals. The Germans, with 20,904 arrivals, maintain 
tlic third rank, while the Hebrews (17,285) have 
dropped to fourth place from the second place a year 
ago. .Scandinavian and Irish immigration is station 
• ary, while a large increase appeared in the immigra- 
tion of Slovak, Croatian, and Magyar peoples. New 
York State received one-third of the immigrants, as 
against 41 per cent, a year ago. 

Concerning the work done by the State 

Bureau of Mediation and Arbitration during 

the quarter, the report recounts that fifty-six 

labor disputes were settled, as compared with 

forty-three in the corresponding period of 

1903. One-half (twenty-eight) of the disputes 

were the outcomes of strikes for higher 

wages, and resulted, in nineteen cases, in the 



complete or partial success of the workmen. 
The number of employes involved in trade 
disputes, however, was only one-third as la rue 
as it was a year ago. This, the Commissioner 
thinks, is mainly due to the progress of the 
joint-trade-agreement system, which substi- 
tutes arbitration for industrial warfare. 

Commissioner Sherman also reviews the re- 
cent strike among the bakers on the Bast Side 
of New York City, saying that "the dangers 
to the public health threatened by the perpet- 
uation of these standards in city bakeshops 
illustrate the need of protective legislation 
and an adequate force of inspectors." What 
these "standards", etc., are like is already 
known to the readers of the Journal, and it 
may be said here, in passing, that the greatest 
benefit derived from the New York bakers' 
strike, both to themselves and to the public, 
has been the focusing of the attention of the 
authorities upon the evils complained of, with 
the certainty of remedial legislation. In this, 
as well as in all other matters, the report 
shows that Commissioner Sherman is a con- 
scientious and capable public official. 



Miscellaneous. 



Our BlviejacKets. 



Tin se who remember the extent and nature 
of the "shore sprees" indulged in by Ameri- 
can man-of-war's-men of the old school are 
pleasantly impressed by the decorum shown 
by the younger generation of our naval sea- 
men while on shore. Commenting upon this 
metamorphosis in the manners of American 
man-of-war's-men, the New York Herald 
says : 

It is a joy to the patriotic heart to note the trim, 
alert, keen-eyed, sun-browned and self-respecting en- 
listed men and youths that constitute our first line of 
defense. It was an old and unwarranted reproach 
against the representatives afloat of our national 
greatness that in the exuberance of rare shore leave 
their conduct left much to be desired, and that their 
haunts were the purlieus of the port. But this was 
never true in any large sense, even in the days of 
wooden walls and hearts of oak, when the sailor of 
tradition was leniently gauged as a hard-drinking, 
hornpipe -dancing, open-handed and reckless son of the 
sea. In every ship's company there may have been a 
few of this dead and gone type, but those who 
shamed their shipmates were least of all typical of an 
honest and rigorous trade. The opportunities and re- 
wards are too great for any such foolishness, and we 
may be sure that the native-borns seen ' ' on liberty ' ' 
are as worthy of the respect and honor of their fel- 
low-citizens as any other class that is adding to the 
dignity and progress of our country. 

With the exception of "the opportunities 
and rewards", what has been said here by the 
Herald anent our naval seamen applies equal- 
ly well to the seamen of our merchant marine. 
Where drunkenness formerly used to be the 
rule it is now literally the exception, and in 
many other ways improvement may be noted. 



Secretary Taft has already begun to un- 
load the cargo of Chinese notions which he 
brought with him from the Orient, and il is 
solemnly pointed out by the press for Cooling 
the people all the time that, in consequence, 
the President is deeply impressed with the 
gravity of the impending crisis in our rela- 
tions with China, in so far as it may affect 
our future trade with that country, etc., etc. 
All of which suggests that humbug is the 
spice of life. 



The Collector of the Port of New York, on 
the 2nd inst., ordered the imposition of a fine 
of $5,000 against the master of the French 
liner L'Aquitaine for violation of the United 
States Passenger Act, in not having the men 
and women properly separated in the vessel's 
steerage. 



Since the last strike of the New York bak- 
ers the Health Department of that city has 
inspected forty-two Manhattan bakeshops. Of 
this number thirty-three were found to be in 
such bad shape that they had to be closed 
pending repairs which would bring them up 
to the standard of sanitation required by the 
law. 



A "Socialist School" will shortly he estab- 
lished in New York City, at a cost of $200,- 
000. The primary design is to provide for an 
"intellectual center" for the Socialist move- 
ment in the United States, and to afford in- 
struction to men in the dogmas of Socialism. 
Branches will gradually be formed in other 
cities. The money for the undertaking comes 
from a bequest made by the late .Mrs. E. I). 
Rand, whose daughter married Professor 
<>'eorge D. Herron, the noted Socialistic prop- 
agandist. 



To attempt to combat error with any weap- 
on other than reason is the greatest error 
of all. 



Prominent members of the Negro Business 
Men's League have taken umbrage at the 
term, "a white man's country," as applied to 
the United States. Well, if this isn't a white 
man's country it must be confessed that it 
looks very much that way to one who is not 
color blind or standing on the wrong side of 
the color line. It will certainly never do to 
associate this great and glorious country in 
our minds with the appearance of a checker- 
board. 



The New York Mail Drivers' Union, which 
went on strike about a month ago for an in- 
crease of wages, shorter hours, and overtime 
pay, won what it struck for. A four-year 
agreement has been signed by the representa- 
tives of the Union and the New York Mail 
Company, by the terms of which the men will 
receive an increase of wages of twenty-five 
cents per day for drivers of double teams, fif- 
teen cents for single teams, twenty-live cents an 
hour for overtime, a vvorkingday to consist of 
twelve hours, including one hour for dinner. 
This will make the pay of the drivers of 
double teams $2.25 per day, and of one-horse 
drivers $1.65 per day. The agreement is dat- 
ed September 30, 1905, and expires on the 
same date in 1909. 



The Jersey City Printing Company has 
brought suit for $100,000 damages against 
Typographical Union No. 94. The trouble 
began about a month ago, when the employes 
of the Company, all members of Typographic- 
al Union No. 94, made a demand for an eight- 
hour day, which was refused. The employes 
thereupon quit work and were replaced by 

non-union men, but the C pany now alleges 

that the members of Typographical Union No. 
94 enticed the non-union men away from the 
Company, thereby inflicting great pecuniary 



(Continued on page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Home News. 



The advent of frosl in Louisiana has 
had a good effect in reducing the amount 
of yellow fever in that State. 

Associate Justice Tucker of the Terri- 
torial Supreme Court of Arizona has been 
requested to resign, on the ^r< >u n.4 of 
misconduct. 

The Commercial Cable Company's fifth 
cable across the Atlantic, from Causa to 
Waterville, Ireland, was completed on 
October 6. 

The first animal convention of Ameri- 
can Indians convened at North Yakima, 
Wash., on October 10, with ten tribes 
represented. 

The population of New J< reey is 2,- 
II i.i 1 1. according to census Bgures just 
announced. Newark leads the cities with 
283,289 residents. 

The Panama Canal Commission has an- 
nulled the contract awarded to .1. E. Mar- 
ke] nf Omaha, for feeding and caring foi 

the employes Of the < 'anal. 

ThC Beef Trust lias entered the retail 
trade in New York by operating through 
a supply company and Boliciting for the 
custom of hotels and boarding Ihmis. -. 

The independent telephone companies 
of the United States met in Rochester, 
N. Y.. recently and formed an organiza- 
tion for mutual protection and progress. 

Episcopal clergymen have organized 
•in association to further union of the 
Anglican Church with the Russian ortho- 
dox ami ancient Eastern churches. 

S ii ms t'ri ti: n has agim developed 
in the administrate e machinery of tin' 
Panama Canal project. A disagreement 

Let ween Secretary of War Tat't and 
President Shouts is reported. 

It is now believed that President 

Roosevelt, in his message to Congress, 

will pass over the subject of the tariff 

and deal strongly with the need of rail- 
road legislation. 

Secretary of state Root has declined 

to accept charge of the Panama Canal 
work, and Secretary id' War Taft will re- 
main in Control, visiting tin- Isthmus in 

November. 

The gold .shipments of the Yukon Ter- 
ritory fol' the season of 1905 jllst closed 

will run approximately to $6,000,000. 

It is est imated that half or more of the 

Fairbanks output had gone to the Coast 

this summer by way of Dawson. 

Judge Wing, of Cincinnati, <>.. having 
declared the Chinese Exclusion Act void 
by the lapse of the treaty between the 
United states and China, a test case will 

lie made in the United States Circuit 

Court id' Appeals, at Cincinnati. From 

there the ease will lie taken to the 

United States Supreme Court. 
The State Department has received 

complaints from consuls in China that 
much - imposed upon 

them by personal investigation of the 

identity of emigrants, the character of 
their business, etc.. ami it is possible that 
Secretary "t' state Root will ask for addi- 
tional assistance in the Chinese consular 
corps. 

The Pullman Company's annual meet 
ing will he held in Chicago on October 
lit, with the expectation that an extra 
cash dividend of possil 1\ _'> per cent will 

lie declared fur the benefit of the stock 
holders. The earnings of the company 

in Hun wen- $24,788,729, an excess of 

more than $1,000,1 ver 11103. The 

i vrnoga for the yeai will approximate 

$25,000,1 

What is said to lie a new record in re- 
ceiving wireless telegrapl gee has 
been made by the Government plant at 

the torpedo station at Newport, R. I. 

Eighteen words a minute were n ived 

dearly and accurately from Cape Henry, 

350 miles; Washington, 325 miles; Phila- 
delphia, 250 miles; Portsmouth, N. II., 

l.'.ii miles, and several Other points where 

the Government has stations. A German 
system was used. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BRILLIANTS 

CLOTH I NG STOR E 
SAN PEDRO. CAL. 

We make a Specialty of Handling only the Best Goods Manufactured 

for Seamen. 

YOU WILL FIND THE UNION LABEL ON OUR GOODS ALSO. 



LIPPHAN BROS. 

CLOTHING AND SHOE, STORE 

"We Carry- the Finest and Most Up-to-date maKes 
of Union Made Goods 

WIEDWALO B'-OCK, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD WINES AND 

LIQUORS. 

BOTTLERS OF SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES BEERS. 

All soods soli! at lowest San Francisco prices. 

We buy direct from Kentucky Distilleries and our California Wineries. 

Seafaring men Invited to inspect our stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN FEDRO, CAL. 



JOHN HELANDER 

Dealer in 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

Groceries, Provisions, Cigars 

Fourth Street, near Beacon, 
San Fedro, Cal. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO, 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Fedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and all San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drug's, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



J. P. SYLVA, Jr. 

Dealer in 

Groceries, Hay and Grain, also Green 

Fruits and Country Produce 

BEACON ST., het. Fourth and Fifth. 
Phone No. 164. SAN FEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. MUNSON 

Dealer in 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE Till-: OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, opposite S. F. Depot, 

SAN PE1 IRO, CAI* 



CIGAR AND TOBACCO STORE 

JACOB OLSEN, No. 324, Prop. 



THE BEST CIGARS IN TOWN. 



Store on Fourth Street, near Beacon, 
SAN FEDRO, CAL. 



FRED SVENDSEN 

UNION EXPRESS 

AND DRAY CO. 

STAND AT FRONT STREET 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SEASIDE MARKET 

CAPTAIN McVICAR and R. L. BAAND 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Beef. Pork, Mutton and Sausages of all Kind: 

Meats Inspected by U. S. Inspectors. 

FRONT STREET, SAN FEDRO, CAL. 

Vessels Supplied at Lowest Rates. 

Telephone 203. 



WHEN DRINKING BEER 



(HAS. A. LUCAS 
Undertaker and Embalmer 

FOURTH ST. 

Bet. Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 




SEE THAT THIS LABEL 
IS ON THE KEG OR BOTTLE 



PEOPLE'S BARGAIN STORE 

Headquarters for UNION MADE CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing' Goods, Boots and 

Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 

Outfits. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 

Ent.f Front and Beacon Sts., San Fedro. 



UNION CIGAR AND 
TOBACCO STORE 

ELIAS WEBERG, Proprietor. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN FEDRO, CAL. 

Union-Made Cig-ars, Tobaccos, Pipes, 
Notions, Etc. 




UNION LABEL 



OF THE 



UNITED HATTERS 



OF N. A. 



When you are buying- a FUR HAT, either soft or 
stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union Label is sewed 
in it. The Genuine Union Label is perforated on the 
four edges exactly the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer has loose labels 
in his possession and offers to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize him. 
l^oose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. Unprincipled manufacturers are 
using them in order to get rid of their scab-made hats. The John B. Stetson 
Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., Is a non-union concern. 

' _ JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 

MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 WaTsrly Place, Room 15, New York, H. T. 



LETTER LIST. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Andersen, < 'lias. ,\. Jurgei si n, Will 
Indersen, Ami p. Johannesen-1557 
Andersen, Alsel Karlson, Gus. E. 

Andersen, Aml-1 litnivlahn. K. 
Admand, I. Knutsen, Knut 

' ndersson, E. Krietsamtn. Ferd. 

Andreasen, Edward Kronvall, Oskar 

lion. A. E.-906Kammermans, w. 
A nilei rim. A. J. Keinis, linns 

Anderron, A. -1055 Krensman, Martin 
Absolonsen. Ole M. Kauai 1, Erik 
Andersen-515 Kirstein, J.-626 

Andersen, A. B. Koso J.-590 



Andersen, Joseph 
Anderson, Olaf 
Anderson. W. G. 
Anderson, S. 
Anderson. W.-991 
Andreasen, N. S. 
Angelbeck, G. 
Appelgren, John 
Arkerlund-l 263 
ion I'. B 
Bogan. Patrick 
l 'i Mt burg, A 
[306 



Kahlbetzer, Fred 

Knmlseii. 1 1 
Koater, 

Ladelane. John 
Lcutter, John 
Larsen, Louis-536 
l.tndnolm, Nestor 
Lund, Charles-599 
i.iiiii.iii Ukee 
Larsen, Robert 
l.i.'. i'.i. i 
G.-Lund, Martin 
Lindgvist. Ernst 



Boj .1. Andrew-1379 Luksie, F ,-689 



I'll!'. A. 

Barnekow, A. O. 

.loll!! K. 

Bernard, tjandalia 
Buch, David 

\. c. 
Booth, a. J. 
Bohman, Erik 
Brlllowskl, Moritz 
Brown, W. J. 
Berg, Gustaf 
Buberg, Nils-989 
■■■. ('. 



holm. B 
ien, A. -961 
Larsen, Ed., I'hotos. 
M.iatta, John 
Magnussen-1147 
McAdam. J. 
McHume, W. H. 

MOOre, James 

Michael. Walter 
Mikkelsson, Alfred 
Mjornes, Arne 
Nelson, Frank 
Nelson, Julius 



Bracca, G.-Reg. let. Nielsen, K. N. 



I'.i 
Bergqvist, J. A. 
Berntsen, O.-1280 
Blanemo, Oscar 
Hlohie, Le Henry 
Brandt, Wm., 
Pregler, Friedrich 
i 'arl son. Fred 
Carlson. J.-388 
Cheodore, Bodiou 

Chrlstensen, Harry Nysinnii. Emil 
Christiansen. Ludv. Nylund, John 
Coffman, Mtlo Olsen. Erik-726 

Danielsen. Gustav Olsen, John B. 
Damianie, Alessan-Olsen, Emil 



Nielson. N. G. 
Nielsen, Niels Chr. 
n, Berger 

Niels, . n , Niels A.-G14 

N i el set 

Xai.i.i. George 
Nilsen 780 
Nummelin, A. 

Nilsen. .lens A. 
Nilsen, Sigurd 



.in, 
Davey, C. 
Diener, Alik 
iMiis. I. -547 
Edson, Frank 
Edlund. J. A. 
Eliason, K. A. 
Evensen, C.-484 
El Ikset 
Eriksson-338 
Ekluna, S. 



• Us. li. S. It. 

i Usen, Ernst 
Olsen, Oscar-630 
< ilavesen, Bven. A. 
i Usen. Wm.-75S 
i ihlsson, i i. 
Perouwer, G. 
Petersen. Chris. 
Pettonen, K. H. 
Petterson, Auel 
Pettersen, Olaf-982 



Ellingren, Frithjof Persson, ft. B.-764 
Eriksen, .Martin Pedersen-896 



Espei 

Engstrom, C. E. 
Freastad, Hans 
i V i na ml.-/.. I '■- 

Km st i om. II. 

Forslander, A. 
Foldat, John 



Pearson, Charles 
Petersen 9 
Pad. s. v.- 17s 
Pou 1 sen. M. P. 
Rasmussen, Adolph 
Rasmussen, TCdw. 
Rasmussen, Victor 



Gronvall. Johan F. Redehman-505 
Gunlach, John Reld, .Tames-326 

Gulbransen, And. RJetad, S. J.-1355 
Gronberg, Erik Rudl, A. M.-677 

Goodmunden, Joh'sRoni, Erik 
Graff, Ed. n A. 

Gustatfson. J.-432 Rohde, Robert 



Gustafson, A. F. 

Gustafson, Oskar 

Hansen, August 

Hansen. J. 

Holtte. John 

Heckman, V 

tte, E, N. 

Ilailit'f. Henry 

Hellman. M. J. K. 

Ham. H T, 

Hazel, Wm. 

n, Harry 
rg, C. II. 

Hill. Frank 

Hlnze, August 

I [akanssen, 

i Hans s. 

Hansen. Karl 

I tansen-676 

Hansen, Laurits 

Haraldsson-1204 

Henrlksen, K. 



Rudolph. Fritz-Reg. 

lett. P. i '. 
Soi onsen, M. -Photo 
Sorensen, C.-1664 
Svendsen, Christ 

!-. Edvin 
Stalsten, Karl 
Schatze, Otto 
Saunders, Carl 
Stokes. Charles 
Selzer, Matt. 
Sin i'o nl, .Mr. 

Harry 

Smith. Henry 
Sundquist, W. W. 

• g, I tern t 
Skogsfjord, Olaf 
Samslo. B. 
Sandon-1579 
Sanltone, J. 
Smith. Pat. 
Smith. Paul 



[mbola, An? -Res Sodergvlst. Otto 

letter. Strand. Ednar 

[mbola, August Svenssen, Hans M. 

etsen, HahlorSwanson, C. 
[ngebretsen, Johan Tornqvist, A. N. 
Jacobsen, Peder Tikander, T. M. 
Jansson. A. -351 Tomask, Math. 

Jansson, Edward J. Verbrugge, 1). 
.lanson, Oscar Verzona. Felix 

.leshke, Hans Wahlstedt, A. It -77S 

Johansen. E. H. Wahlman, .1. - Res. 



Johansen, E. W. 
Johansen. Gunen 



letter P. I ». 
Warren. W. A. 



Johnson. Emll-1576 Westergren. Carl 



Jordan. C. 
.ii.h i nssen-1 428 
Julians. Chas. 

nsen, Th. 
Jorgensen, Walter 



Wahlstedt, Rafael 
nan, Frank 
Wlkstrom, W. 
Wirtanen, Gustaf 

Warta. Arthur 



Johansson. Charles Wisbel, Johannes 
Jeskke, Hans Westerholm. Aug. 

Johnsson, 0. W. Wilson, Edward 

ii. Julius L. Yves. Allaisu 
Johannesen, HansH.Yerna, Frank 
Jensen, Rasmus Zugehaer. Alex. 
.1 i r\ Inen, Karl G. Zeidler, Fi 
Johansson, Anders Zimmerman, Fritz 

usen. J. W. Zlllmann, Bernhard 
Johnson, Otto 



ASTORIA, OR. 



COLUMBIA RIVER 

Fishermen's Protective Union 

Headquarters. Astoria. Or. 

H. M. LORNTSEN, Secretary, 

P. O. Box 138. 

The Reading Room Is open at all 

times to Members of the 

Sailors' Union. 



When making purchases from our adver- 
tisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen 's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






Pacific Coast Marine, 







The schooner Tartar was sold at San Francisco on 
October 12 by the United States Marshal for $220. 
Richard A. Sehmalle was the purchaser. 

Captain Casey reports that the Stanley Dollar, re- 
cently stranded on the Japanese coast, is a total loss. 
The wreck has been sold for $13,500. 

The British four-masted barkentine Renfield, 123 
days out from London for Fremantle, and for some 
time quoted at 5 per cent for reinsurance, is reported 
to have reached her destination in safety. 

The contract for repairing the Canadian Govern- 
ment steamer Quadra, which was ashore near Raci 
Rocks, iias been awarded to the Victoria Machinery 
depot. The work will cost about $10,000. 

The French bark Leon XIII, reported on October 3, 
as having put into Montevideo in distress, broke her 
rudder at sea and will be surveyed and repaired. It 
may not be necessary to discharge the cargo. 

Another libel was begun against the towboat George 
R. Bailey on October 4 in the United States District 
Court at San Francisco. James A. Thomson sues for 
$241, alleged as due for material and towing. 

The steamer Argo, which had been stranded at the 
mouth of the Eel River, Cal., since October 8, was 
floated on the 10th. The vessel, which was undam- 
aged, was towed to the dock at Port Kenyon. 

The British bark Antiope, which was seized by the 
Japanese, has been declared a prize. The Antiope 
sailed from San Francisco on June 21 for Nicolaevsk 
and was seized by the Japanese in the Gulf of Sag- 
halien on August 13. 

A contract has been arranged between the under- 
writers and a well-known shipping man for the salving 
of the cargo, fittings and everything detachable, and, 
it' possible, the hull, of the steamer St. Paul, which 
went on the rocks near Point Gorda, Cal., recently. 

The Norwegian steamer Reidar is on her way to the 
Coast from the Orient, and will be used upon arrival 
by the Western Fuel Company in the coal trade be- 
tween Puget Sound ports and San Francisco in con- 
junction with the Titania, Tellus and Terje Viken. 

Major William Glassford, in charge of the United 
States cable office at Seattle, Wash., has inaugurated 
a private marine exchange, which will report the ar- 
rival and departure of every steamer that touches at 
an Alaskan port. 

Four large steamers, sailing on October 2 and 3, for 
Nome, Alaska, will race to see which can reach Behr- 
ing Sea first, land their freight and get away. The 
vessels are the steamers Oregon, Victoria, Senator and 
Leelanaw. 

The barkentine Archer, from Honolulu, arrived at 
San Francisco on October 8, in the fast time of thir- 
teen days. Her passage from Hawaii is remarkably 
good. Most of the sugar vessels have been consuming 
three weeks or more on the trip. 

The bark Roderick Dim, for years plying regularly 
in the Island sugar trade, has been chartered to carry 
wheat from Tacoma or Portland to San Francisco at 
a rate of $2 a ton. She is chartered for three voyages, 
and is to be towed along the Coast. 

The schooner Oakland arrived at Astoria, Or., on 
October 7, under her own canvas, but flying a signal of 
distress. She was out sixteen days from San Fran- 
cisco, but on account of lack of a tow and inclement 
weather was unable to make Tillamook bar. 

Captain John Bermingham, Supervising Inspector 
for this District, has received orders from Secretary 
Metcalf, through George Uhler, head of the Steam- 
boat Inspection Service, to begin at once a reinspec- 
tion of all the steamers in service within his juris- 
diction. 

The British bark Kirkhill, bound from Newcastle, 
England, for San Francisco, has been lost near Cape 
Horn. The telegram received on October 3, from Lou 
don reported that the vessel had struck on Wolf Bock 
and foundered. All on board were saved and taken to 
Stanley, Falkland Islands. 

The Oceanic liner Alameda has made temporary re- 
pairs and docked to discharge the remainder of her 
cargo. It is believed that the vessel will be able to 
resume her service within two months or less. The 
cost of her repairs, roughly estimated, will amount to 
about $60,000. 

The steamer Tees, at Vancouver, B. C, on October 
13, from the North, reports the finding of dead cattle, 
boat's gear and a life-buoy without any lettering at 
the Christie Passage. One of the worst storms ever 
experienced up the Coast had been raging for twenty- 
four hours. 

At a meeting of the freight bureau of the Northern 
Pacific Asiatic line, held at Seattle, Wash., on October 
12 it was decided to increase the rate on Hour ship 
meats to the Orient 50 cents on the ton. Conrmencing 
January 1 the rate will be $4.50, instead oi $4. The 
rate to Shanghai will be $5. , . , , , 

Captain Arthur H. Scott of the bark Gerard C. 
Toby, was reinstated to citizenship by Judge Kerrigan 
in the Superior Court at San Francisco on October 11. 
Captain Scott was recently compelled to surrender Ins 
citizenship papers and master's license on account ot 
irregularities in his naturalization. 

Captain H. T. Payne had his license as master sus- 
pended thirty days by Supervising Inspector ('apt am 
John Bermingham at San Francisco on October LO, as 
a result of the collision between the steam schooner 
Del Norte, of which Payne was master, and a South- 
ern Pacific car float, on September 21. 

Changes of masters reported at San Francisco on 
October 12 included W. Kidston, in the steamer Costa 
Rica, vice C. Randall; Captain W. B. Seabury, vice A. 
Zeeder, in the steamer Korea; A. Reed vice H. U 
Pavne, in the steamer Del Norte; L. A. lose,,, < u 
Wenkel, in the steamer Alcazar; M. Mikkclscn, vice 
J. F. Chlemens, in the steamer Confianza. 



Frank Turner and John B. Wolters have been ap- 
pointed Assistant Inspectors of Steam Vessels at 
Seattle, Wash. Mr. Wolters has been chief engineer 
of the steamer Umatilla for the past eight years and 
resigned his position on that steamer to accept li is ap- 
pointment. He will be succeeded by Peter Sheppard, 
first-assistant engineer of the Umatilla. 

The bark Nicholas Thayer is safe. She sailed from 
San Francisco some months ago for Nome, and her 
failure to arrive al the Alaskan port caused some 
anxiety. On October 11 a report was received thai the 

Thayer had arrived at Paget Sound, after a voyage to 
Alaska. The Thayer did not go as far north as Nome, 
and for this reason was not reported by steamers lately 
returning from the mining camp. 

The license of H. F. McMullen, chief engineer of the 
Pacific Mail liner Newport, has been suspended for 
ninety days by the Local Inspectors Bulger and Bolles. 
Complaint against McMullen was brought by Captain 
W. J. Russell, of the Newport, who alleged that Mc- 
Mullen had been guilty of insubordination and intoxi- 
cation while on duty. The decision of Bolles and Bul- 
ger states that the charge of intoxication is not sirs 
tained. 

Japanese Consul S. Ilisamidzu at Seattle, Wash., on 
October 12 presented a medal for bravery to Captain 
Conrad R. Larsen of the American bark Eclipse. The 
presentation was made on behalf of the Japanese Em- 
peror for saving the lives of two survivors of a fishing 
sloop, lost off the Japanese coast a year ago. Captain 
Larsen, then in command of the bark William F. 
Garms, picked up the two survivors 150 miles off the 
Japanese coast, the day following the wreck. 

There were numerous additions on October 5 to the 
list of overdue vessels, but no high rates of reinsur- 
ance were quoted on any of them. The Italian ship 
Orealla, which had been on the board for some time 
at a rate of lo per cent, was reported to have arrived, 
after a passage id' 142 days from Jiinin to Rotterdam. 
The additions to the list include the British ship Dean- 
mount, French bark Ville de Mulhouse, Wulfrau Puget 
and British bark Renfield. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at San 
Francisco on October l(i: German bark Edmund, 144 
days from Port Talbot for [quique, 35 per cent. 
French bark St. Donatien, 144 days from Bordeaux for 
Adelaide, 10 per cent. British bark Principality, 165 
days from Junin for Rotterdam, 90 per cent. British 
bark Kilmallie, 147 days from Shields for Tacoma, 10 
per cent. Italian ship Affezione, IIS days from Bahia 
Blanca for Stockholm, England, 25 per cent. British 
bark Forteviot, 14fi days from Shields for San Fran 
cisco, 2o per cent. French bark Duchesse de Berry, 

1S3 days from Swansea for San Francisco, 15 per cent. 
Captain Casey, who was in command of the steamer 
Stanley Dollar when she went ashore on the Japanese 
coast on September <>, arrived in San Francisco on Oc- 
tober 13. According to the finding of the naval court 
investigating the stranding of the Stanley Dollar, it 
was found that she struck an isolated and sunken 
rock two and one-half miles east-southeast from Hachi- 
man, and, having been seriously damaged, was floated 
as soon as possible and taken to Kawadzu village, 
where she was finally abandoned by the crew on Sep- 
tember 18. It appears from the evidence that Captain 
Casey was entirely blameless in striking the uncharted 
rock. 



DIED. 



August Nylund, No. 509, a native of Finland, aged 
28, drowned from the steamer Chico, off Fort Bragg, 
Cal., October 9, 190."). 

William Schimmeck, No. 1624, a native of Germany, 

aged 23, died at United Slates Sanitarium, Fort Stan- 
ton, N. M., October 5, 1905. 

CORRECTION. 

The name of Harrold Syoersen, published in last 
week's issue, should read Harald Syversen. 



StriKes in Great Britain. 



HOW'S THIS? 



We offer One Hundred Dollars Reward for any case 
of Catarrh that cannot be cured by Hall's Catarrh 
Cure. F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, O. 

We, the undersigned, have known F. J. Cheney for 
the last 15 years, and believe him perfectly honorable 
in all business transactions, and financially able to 
carry out any obligations made by his firm. 

Walding, Kinnan & Marvin, 
Wholesale Druggists, Toledo, O. 

Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken internally, acting di- 
rectly upon the blood and mucous surfaces of the sys- 
tem. Testimonials sent free. Price, 75c. per bottle. 
Sold by all Druggists. 

Take Hall's Family Pills for constipation. 



F. R. Wall, who was for many years an officer in 
the United States Navy, is now practicing marine law 
in San Francisco. He gives claims of all seafarers 
careful attention. Merchants' Exchange building, 

California street, near Montgomery; rooms 208-209 
Phone Bush 508. 



Bagley's Sun-Cured is now packed in pouches and 
the fronts will be received assorted with labels from 
the foil packages, for premiums. 



A report of the British Board of Trade on 
strikes and lockouts in the United Kingdom 
in the year 1904 has just been published. It 
shows that 354 labor disputes were recorded 
during the year, involving about 87,- 
000 work people, or less than one per 
cent of the industrial population of 
the country, exclusive of agricultural laborers 
and seamen. The disputes, old and new, 
which were presented for arbitration and set- 
tlement in 1904, resulted in the loss of about 
1,450,000 working days. Mori; than two-fifths 
of the disputes arose in the mining and 
quarrying industries. Taking the whole 
industrial population into consideration, the 
time lost by these disputes amounted during 
the year to only about one-seventh of a day 
for each employe. The average annual num- 
ber of labor disputes in the five years from 
1899 to 1903 was 568. The average number 
of work people affected was 184,000, and the 
average duration of the disputes was 3,125,000 
days. In the five preceding years, from 1894 
to 1898, the average annual number of dis- 
putes was 835; the average number of work 
people affected, 254,000, and the average dur- 
ation of the disputes 8,927,000 days. 

The principal cause of the labor difficulties 
in 1904, as in previous years, was the wage 
question. There was a smaller number oi' 
persons affected by disputes last year over 
working arrangments and through the re- 
fusal to work with non-union men than in the 
preceding year. The number of labor disputes 
in 1904 was far less than the annual average 
for the decade from 1894 to 1903, while the 
number of work people affected by these 
disputes in 1904 was about one-third of the 
average number affected from 1894 to 1898, 
and less than one-half of the average number 
affected from 1899 to 1903. 

There are many unemployed in Great Brit- 
ain at the present time, and great unrest pre- 
vails amongst cotton workers because of 
dissatisfaction with the scale of wages paid, 
but misunderstandings between employers 
and employes seem to be diminishing and to 
be more readily adjusted. Whether or not this 
is merely a passing phase of the labor situa- 
tion in the United Kingdom or an indication 
of growing good will between the employers 
and the wage-earners can only be determined 
by future developments. 



Scientific circles in Winnipeg, Canada, are 
interested in the discovery of a process for 
welding copper, which has been made by a 
local blacksmith. It is said fhe process has 
been thoroughly tested and found perfect, and 
that copper can be welded to copper or to 
other metals without impairing the electrical 
conductivity and other properties of the metal. 
The process is said to be very simple and no 
more costly than the Avoiding of steel. The 
work can be done with a forge, blowpipe, or 
any apparatus which will heat the metal 
cherry red. Patents have been applied for in 
(he United States and Canada. 



The Indian Government has prepared plans 

and drafts for improving the city of Calcutta. 
The estimated cost of the projected works is 
$27,500,000, which is to be raised by a loan. 
The latter will be guaranteed by the Govern- 
ment, but the city is to pay the interest and 
amortization, for which purpose a fax on jute 
and on real estate is to be levied. 



Demand Hi 1, anion label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 
JOURNAL^ 



Published Weekly by 

THE SAILORS - UNION OF THF PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



W. MACARTHUR.... Editor | P. SCHARRENBERG, Manage! 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail. - $2.00 | Six months, $1.0' 

Single copies, 10 cents each. 
Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Satu> 
Jay noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply correspondents shoulii 
address all communications of a business nature tc 
the Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
southwest corner East and Mission streets, San 
Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, 



OCTOBER 18, 1905. 



COMPULSORY ARBITRATION. 



The attempt to commit the British trade 
unionists to compulsory arbitration was again 

defeated by the r nl Trade-Union Congress, 

the proceedings of which arc noted elsewhere 

in this issue. The proposition was defeated 
by a majority of 92,000 votes. Last year the 
majority against compulsory arbitration was 
486,000, in a total vote slightly smaller than 
that recorded in the present instance. The 
falling off in the majority opposed to the plan 
in question does not indicate a corresponding 
change of sentiment in favor of the plan; on 
the contrary, it merely indicates a willingness 
that those who favor compulsory arbitration 
shall have an opportunity to test its alleged 
virtues in their own case, without danger to 
other organizations. The fact that even this 
compromise with the proposition failed of 
adoption is a very significant illustration of 
the conviction that prevails in Great Britain 
against the proposition to settle (?) the labor 
question by a process of judicial suppression. 
From our European exchanges we learn 
dial tin' plan of compulsory arbitration in- 
troduced in the recent Congress provided For 
the establishment of that system under condi- 
tions which would make it applicable only to 
such labor organizations as might agree be- 
forehand to be governed by it. Such a pro- 
posal is safe and reasonable on the surface, 
but only on the surface. The avowed purpose 
of compulsory arbitration is to stop strikes. 
With that primary purpose in view the ad- 
ministrators of the system have ruled that 
compulsory arbitration laws must be so con- 
strued and administered as to prevent the pos- 
sibility of strikes occurring through the 
failure of any organization to become party 
to the law. Thus we find, as in Australia and 
New Zealand, the "common rule," under 
which an award rendered in the case of a 
single organization is made applicable to all 
the workers in the trade, and the law pro- 
vides that a few men may form a union and 
register under the law, thus establishing a 
dual union, the effect and purpose of which is 
to force the original and bona fide organiza- 



tion into compliance with the decisions of the 
compulsory arbitration court. Doubtless the 
Miners and others who opposed the compro- 
mise plan in the British Trade-Union Con- 
gress were aware of these dangers and realized 
that compulsory arbitration, once established, 
is certain to be applied to all and sundry, will- 
ing: and unwilling. 

For a conclusive illustration of the manner 
in Avhich the "common rule" operates against 
the interests of legitimate trade-unionism we 
need but look to Australia, the country to 
which the compulsory-arbitrationist is wont 
to refer in justification of his hopes. In New 
South Wales we find the Australian Workers' 
(Shearers) Union, once the most powerful or- 
ganization in the Colonies, compelled to assume 
a defensive attitude, and, in fact, to accept 
a non-union rate of wages, as a result of the 
creation (by the employers) of a dual union 
and an award of wages based upon the non- 
unionists' (this is, the employers) proposals. 
The award thus rendered was made a "com- 
mon rule," and the union shearers were forc- 
ed to relinquish a winning strike and accept 
work at the non-union rate. Thus the Austra- 
lian Workers' Union received a blow from 
which it has not yet recovered. The organiza- 
tion in question publicly acknowledged that 
the law which had been designed for its bene- 
fit, and for the existence of which it was 
largely responsible, had operated to its serious 
injury ; further, that, instead of bringing about 
peace it had created strife. There are not want- 
ing numerous instances of a like kind, which. 
despite the evident determination in many 
quarters, especially in official quarters, to pu1 
the best possible face upon the matter, dem- 
onstrate a growing dissatisfaction with the 
system and forecast its ultimate repudiation. 
Certain of these instances have been cited in 
these columns from time to time. Another in- 
stance in point occurs in a current issue of the 
Brisbane (Queenland) Worker, a leading 
Australian labor paper, as follows: 

it unjustifiable ami uncalled-fur wage-reducing 
awards by the West Australian Arbitration Court have 
thoroughly disgusted the workers in that State, who 
have lost all confidence in that body, as at present 

(•(instituted. In union circles the Court is universal];. 
regarded as " the weapon in the hands of employers." 

In the light of these developments the ac- 
tion of our British fellow-unionists is a lu- 
minous example of the wisdom that follows the 
fact ! 



The views expressed in another column by 
'The Doctor", touching the treatment ac- 
corded the men of the steward's departmenl 
on the wrecked steamer St. Paul, will be ap 
proved by all disinterested persons. AVe would 
point out, however, that our correspondent s 
suggestion that the legal responsibility of the 
shipowner toward the crew ends with the loss 
of the vessel, is an error. The shipowner's legal 
responsibility continues until the shipwrecked 
crew are returned to a home port and paid off. 
The idea of abandoning shipwrecked men im- 
mediately they are cast ashore is repugnant to 
the sense of humanity, and. what is more to 
I he point, it is clearly a violation of the law. 



Referring to Captain Taylor's proposal for 
tie establishment of a trainin<?-ship, as con- 
tained in that gentleman's communication in 
this issue, it is to be hoped that those who 
favor the plan outlined will take into consid- 
eration the facts concerning the previous ven- 
ture of the kind in San Francisco. Experi- 
ence is a school that even the wise man may 
go to occasionally, with profit to himself ami 
others. 



Brigadier-General Funston, commanding 
the Department of California, in his annual 
report notes the large number of desertions 
from the Army, and discusses the cause and 
remedy therefor, as follows: 

One of the causes is the pool pay received by the 

enlisted man. as compared with the wages he ear earn 
in civil employment. It is not fair to compare his 

pay with that received by soldiers in the sane 

in foreign countries where military service is compul- 
sory. There military service is a duty to be rendered 
to the State, pay or no pay. Comparison may lie in 

cited to the lower pay received by the English soldier, 

as his service is not compulsory. However, while his 
pay is less than the pay of our soldiers, it bears about 
the same relation to his wage-earning capacity as decs 
the pay of our soldier to his wage-earning capacity. 
But the English are having more trouble getting good 
men than we are, and one of the remedies mrgi 
their Parliament is increase of pay. 

Desertion is not so common in the English army as 
in ours because public opinion in that, country con- 
demns the crime and public opinion in America does 
not. 

Our army is an army of volunteers. If we want to 
obtain a better class of men to enlist than we are now 
securing, a better rate of pay is the first inducement 
that should be offered. 

General Funston is to be congratulated up- 
on having touched the core of the subject, i. e., 
the comparison between the man's wage-earn- 
ing capacity as a soldier and as a citizen. 
The General's observations apply not only to 
the soldier, but also to the seaman, and not 
only to the naval seaman, but also to the mer- 
chant seaman. In the long run, the question 
of wages determines men's choice of service, 
in the Army, the Navy, the merchant marine. 
or in any other vocation. Considering the 
natural, not to mention the acquired disad- 
vantages of life in the Army and Navy, the 
wages in these services must be higher than 
Ihose paid for ordinary labor, in order to di- 
vert men from the latter field. General Funs- 
ton's reasoning is sound and his suggestion 
practical. We only wish that Congress might 
be prevailed upon to adopt a measure so sim- 
ple, and yet so comprehensive. 



Sacrifices are sometimes necessary to install 
great precautions. A thousand perished miserably in 
the Iroquois Theatre fire in Chicago, but millions have 
been safer by the lesson taught by that awful disaster. 
So the men of the Maine, Bennington and Mikasa have 
• 1 in vain if the naval powers of the world are 
taught the need of forethought in safeguarding their 
ships against such appalling sacrifices. — San Francisco 
Call. 

The Call's philosophy is very comforting, 

provided it isn't scrutinized too closely. The 
"if" in this instance is a very suggestive one. 
The defect in our contemporary's philosophy 
lies in the fact that the "awful disaster" 
teaches nothing to those responsible therefor; 
they make a great deal of fuss, and then "for- 
get it." The "awful disaster" is usually the 
result, not of any lack of forctln night, but of 
downright indifference, combined with greed 
or false economy, and no amount of sacrifice, 
on other people's part, will cure the trouble. 
The sacrifice of a few of the persons primarily 
responsible for the "awful disaster" might 
prove more to the point. Such a sacrifice 
would appall certain persons who seem most 
in need of that sensation. Of course, under 
the circumstances of its being, the San Fran* 
cisco Call can not be expected to go as far as 
I his. The most successful newspaper philos- 
ophy is that which stops short of including 
the newspaper proprietor. 



When we reflect upon the dangers of 
compulsory arbitration we can not but be 
grateful to our Australian fellow-unionists for 
having offered themselves as a "horrible ex- 
ample 



If the signs be not deceptive the day is not 
far distant in which the Australian and 
British trade-unionists will lead the United 
States in the demand for the union label. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Shipwrecked Men Deserted. ' Training-Ship Proposed. 



The San Francisco Call, of October 7, pub- 
lished a dispatch from Eureka, relative to the 
shipwrecked crew of the steamer St. Paul, 
which, in part, is as follows: 

Of the people on board the St. Paul only the help in 
the steward's department suffered. The company re- 
fused to provide hotel accommodations for the cooks 
and waiters, and they were left to rustle beds and 
food the best they could. Neither would the steward 
pay them the wages due them. He said he had orders 
to provide only for the passengers. The officers of the 
St. Paul are comfortably quartered at the Hotel Vance. 

The St. Paul was, I believe, controlled or 
operated by the Pacific Mail interests, one of 
the great companies which are striving tooth 
and nail to obtain a subsidy from the Federal 
Government, and this is how they treat the 
American seaman ! Assuming that the re- 
sponsibility of the Company ended with the 
loss of the vessel, common humanity would 
have dictated a more liberal policy. From all 
that can be learned from press dispatches and 
from statements made by passengers, the help 
of the steward's department were not derelict 
in their duties, but, on the contrary, con- 
ducted themselves as becomes American sea- 
men in the strenuous times subsequent to the 
stranding of the vessel. And this is their re- 
ward, to be left destitute, far from their 
home port, and refused even the meager pit- 
tance that they had more than earned, thus 
being compelled to throw themselves upon the 
charity of strangers. We are often asked, 
"Why does not the American boy go to sea?" 
The reasons arc self-evident. 

This is not the first time that the steward's 
department of the Harriman line has suffer- 
ed. The case of the steamer George W. Elder 
is a parallel one. Stranded in the Columbia 
River, the boys had to support themselves, 
and only after repeated telegrams to the gen- 
eral manager were they given a steerage pas- 
sage to San Francisco. 

Such matters are not conducive to the birth 
of that era of good feeling between shipown- 
ers and their employes for which we are all 
expectantly waiting, but engender ill-will 
and a feeling akin to hatred. The writer 
knew the general manager in his "salad days," 
as a junior officer in the United States Navy, 
when he was thought to be a pretty good sort 
of chap ; and it seems hardly possible that he 
has so degenerated as to be oblivious of the 
wellbeing of the men in his employ and per- 
mit them to become objects of public charity, 
to the shame of the Company and himself. 

These are the facts, and the writer trusts 
lliat Mr. Schwerin will disavow the actions of 
his subordinates, or the writer will blush with 
shame that the one here referred to ever trod 
the decks of that glorious old tub, the Wyo- 
ming. The Doctor. 

San Francisco. 



Considered as a clear case of "making a 
virtue of necessity," the Japanese are en- 
titled to credit for waiving their demands for 
indemnity. Considered as a voluntary act in 
the interest of "humanity and civilization," 
the Japs are entitled to no more credit for 
their diplomatic backdown than is the burglar 
who doesn't touch the "stuff" because he 
can't open the safe in which it is contained. 
Those newspaper editors who are now slob- 
bering over the Japs, attributing to them all 
the virtues of Heaven, will some day awake to 
a realization of their own contemned folly. 



Put your anti-Chinese principles into prac- 
tice by refusing to patronize Chinese labor in 
any forml 



Editor Coast Xeamkn 's, Jouhnal: I address 
you on the subject of a nautical school-ship 
for American youths desiring to become sea- 
men, with the ultimate object of becoming 
masters and officers of American vessels, eith- 
er steam or sail. The States of New York and 
Pennsylvania support the training ships St. 
Marys and Saratoga, respectively, on which 
young men are trained for the merchant ma- 
rine at the expense of the States. The Pacific 
Coast has not one training-ship, but instead, 
the American boy, if he wishes to become a 
seaman and a navigator must, if he can get 
a chance, serve as a deckboy, swabbing paint, 
washing decks, or driving a winch. After be- 
coming an A. B. he takes a smattering of 
navigation in a nautical school on shore, where 
he is crammed or stuffed with a few rules to 
enable him to pass the examination before the 
United States Inspectors of Steam and Sail 
Vessels. It is hardly necessary to remark that 
knowledge of the profession of a seaman and 
navigator acquired in such a happy-go-lucky 
manner hardly fits a young man for the great 
responsibility of commanding one of our mod- 
ern vessels. As to the plan for establishing 
a training-ship, I suggest the following: 

Acquire a vessel by proper representation, 
through responsible shipping men. No doubt 
one of the old, obsolete Navy frigates could be 
procured from the Navy Department. The 
old Marion would do nicely; the engines could 
be taken out and the deck closed. This would 
■jive plenty of room for the sleeping quarters, 
mess rooms, lavatories, and school-room for 
studies, etc. The Marion has a sufficient num- 
ber of yards, masts and good ground tackles, 
which could be utilized for drill purposes. 
The vessel could be anchored at Tiburon, or 
near Sausalito. 

The course of training would consist of 
swimming, boxing, wrestling, boat-sailing, 
boat-pulling, seamanship, rigging, setting and 
taking in of sail, sending up and down masts 
and yards, mathematics, navigation and nau- 
tical astronomy, maritime law, ship's business, 
itc A board of directors consisting of three 
representative shipowners or managers should 
be appointed from among our local business 
men. Financial secretary, treasurer and 
faculty to be appointed by board of directors. 

If the school should be conducted at the ex- 
pense of the State it could be made to pay all 
expenses, providing the students were charged 
a1 the rale of $300 per year. Students to be 
led for the above stun, but clothing, books, 
etc., to be charged extra. 

It will no doubt be understood that this 
letter is only a synopsis of the plan, so I shall 
be pleased to be interviewed by responsible 
parties. I sincerely hope that the State or 
shipping community will take up the matter, 
if not I may try it alone, should I secure the, 
moral backing of the shipping interests on the 
Pacific Coast. Respectfully, 

Henry Taylor, 
Principal Taylor's Nautical Academy. 

San Francisco. 



Don't drink Rainier beer nor any other beer 
that does not bear the union label! All fair 
brands bear the red label of the United 
Brewery Workmen's Union. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' AS- 
SOCIATION OF THE ATLANTIC. 



Headquarters, New Fork, X Y., Oct. 5, 1905. 
Shipping fair; prospeets » >• 

II. 1'. Griffin, Secretary. 
166 Christopher at. 



* 


OFFICIAL. 


* 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. Hi, 1905. 
Kegular weekly meeting was called to order at 7:30 
p. m., Ed. Andersen presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping fair. A donation of one hundred dollars was 
made to the Nanaimo, B. C, miners. The election of 
delegates to the International Seamen's Union eon 
vention at Cleveland, O., was proceeded with. 

A. Furusetii, Secretary. 
S. W. cor. East and Mission sts. Tel. Main 5397. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 9, L905. 

Shipping fair; prospects good. Men still scarce. 
H. L. Petterson, Agent. 
3004 McCarver st. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 9, 1905. 
Shipping fair. 

P. B. Gill, Agent. 
1312 Western ave. P. O. Box 48. Tel. James 3031 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 9, 1905. 

No meeting; no quorum. Shipping slack; few men 
ashore. 

Wm. Thorbeck, Agent. 

114 Quincy st. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 443. 



Aberdeen Agkncy, Oct. !>, 1905. 
Situation unchanged. 

Wm. C.ohl, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland (Or.) Agency, Oct. !>, L905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Pew men ashore. 

D. W. Paul, Agent, 
40 Union ave. Tel. Hood 352. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 9, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fair; prospects 
uncertain. 

C. Sorensen, Agent. 
222 C street. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 506. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. !), 1905. 
Shipping rather dull; prospects medium. 

Harry Ohlsen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 774. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' AS 
S0CIATI0N OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 12, 1905. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 7:30 
p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary reported 
shipping quiet; good many men ashore. The Quarterly 
Finance Committee reported having found honks, Will's 
and cash on hand and in banks correct. The Shipwreck 
Benefit was ordered paid to eleven members of the crevi 
of the wrecked steamer St. Paul. Comrade *'. A. Hall- 
berg died in Hoquiam, Wash., and was buried by the 
Association. 

Eugene Steidle, Secretary. 
54 Mission st. 



Seattle (Wash.) Agency, Oct. 5, l!)i).">. 
No meeting. Shipping quiet. Sailing ship cooks 
scarce. 

.1. .). llfcaii'.s, Agent pro tern. 

Sax Pedro (Cal.) Agency, Oct. 5, 1905. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

G. Lloyd, Agent. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters, Chicago, Ii.i.., Oct. 9, 1905. 
Shipping medium. Conditions normal. 

V. A. OLANDER, Asst. Secretary. 
123 North Desplaines st. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS OF THE 
GREAT LAKES. 



Headquarters, Buffalo, \. v., Oct. 3, L905. 

Shipping good for stewards. 

H. B. Walker, Secretary. 

55 Main st. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Oct. 10. 1905. 
Shipping fair. Prospeets for the general coasting 
I rade this winter poor. 

Wm. II. l'i. • \ her, Secretary. 
1M>A Lewis st. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION. 



Headquarters, Brooklyn, \. v., Oct. 4, i: 
Shipping slack; quite a few men ashore. Branches 

meet ing with fair BUCCOSS. 

Daniel Sullivan, Secretary. 
15 Union st. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOUENAL. 



= =Oo the Great Lake 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 
. . ... . . 




.^?><S> < ^-<fe<3><fr<>><jx3>a><3><3^^ 



SinKing of the Tuthill. 

Our man is believed to have losl his life as 
the result of the sinking of the tug Fannie 
Tut hill by an unknown strainer in Lake St. 
Clair near the canal on October 1. Captain 
Adair was penned in the pilot-house by escap 
ing steam from the broken pipes and was 
badly burned about the upper body before he 
could escape through the window. 

Fireman Harry Burr proved himself a 
hero by springing into the hold of the sinking 
craft and dragging three of the sleeping crew 
on deck before their boat was under water. 
After the accident the colliding steamer left 
the scene at once, but the steamers Mariposa 
and G. II. Russel succeded in picking up all 

but one. This man, whose name is not known. 

left the life-raft to swim to the City of Toledo 
and was not seen afterward. Seven of the 
crew were landed at Detroit from the .Mari- 
posa and the Russel brought down six. Most 
of the men were workmen on the dredges of 
M. Babbitt & Son which are now working at 
the Flats canal. 

For a time the smokestack of the tug pro 
jected above the water and in the hour be- 
tween the time of the collision and the rescue 
two of the crew. Harry Burr and Prank 
Murphy, were perched in safety on the edge 
of the stack- with their feet dangling inside. 
Two others clung to a keg, while tin remain- 
der of the crew had taken to the small boat 
and life-rafts. 

It is reported that the steamer I). C. Whit- 
ney was the colliding boat, and this is 
strengthened by the fad that she had a big 
temporary patch on the port bow when she 
passed down the following day. The tug was 
struck almost squarely on the bow and sank 
quickly. 

As the sunken tug is lying in the channel, 
across Lake St. Clair, vessel masters are in- 
structed to use great caution in passing. 
Colonel Davis, United States district engineer, 
has taken a steamer to move the wreck. 

The sunken tug lies aboul 1,000 feel belovi 
the gas buoy in the dredged channel nf the 
Lake and is directly in the way of passing 
vessels. The wreck was si ruck on the 2nd by 
the steamer Bransford. The Tut hill is own- 
ed by John P. Nagel, of Toledo, and under 
charter to M. Babbitt & Suns, contractors, 
now at work on the St. Clair Flats canal. 



The keel for the new car-ferry for Lake 
Erie service will be laid al the St. Clair 
yards of the Great Lakes Engineering works. 

A lii'j- steel dredge bcow is now building there 
for Dunbar & Sullivan, and work on the ear- 
ferry will be started as soon as this craft is 

launched. 



Lieutenant Commander J. M. Orchard, In- 
spector of the Ninth Lighthouse District, lias 
notified mariners that the lighl vessel on 
Gray's Reef, temporarily withdrawn from tin 
station for repairs, has been replaced. 



The lighting of the Well and Canal by elec- 
tricity to permit the free movement of vessels 
at night has been tried and has proved fairly 
satisfactory. It has cost the Dominion Gov- 
ernment $100,000 to install the plant. 



WrecKing the Maritana. 

A large factor in the release of the steel 
Trust steamer .Maritana from the rocks near 
Detour was the use of air compressors. And 
the most effective of the three air compri 
in operation was an eleven-inch rotary pump 
changed into a compressor. The Detroit Free 
Press says: 

The idea of making an air compressor out 
of a rotary pump, for wrecking operations, 
was conceived sometime since, but almost the 
first successful test of the project was made in 
releasing the Maritana this week. 

At the point where the suction-coupling is 

made in the rotary, Chief Engii r Simmons. 

of thewrecker Favorite,one ofthemosl practi- 
cal men in his line on the Lakes, succeeded in 
Fitting on a hood of considerable length, which 

tapered from eleven inches dow a to two inches. 
With this arrangement he was able to develop 
a pressure of ten to fifteen pounds. The 
rotary pump was then connected with the 
sounding hole in the tank top, which is used 
in determining the depth of water in the water 

bottom of the Vessel. When the connection 
was completed and the pump started, the wat- 
er bottom was speedily freed of water, and it 
was an easy matter to keep it free. Engineer 
Simmons who was asked about the matter by 
Captain C. 11. Sinclair, representative of the 
underwriters, maintains that the converted ro- 
tary was more effective than the air compres- 
sors. 

When the regular air compressors and the 
"converted" machine were put into operation 
the vessel was raised a foot in shorl order. As 

she rested on the bottom Hie freighter was 
comparatively free from a point beginning 
about 100 feet back from the bow. and was 
also unhampered aft. She seemed to lie rest- 
ing on rocks at the point mentioned, a 
hundred feet back from the bow. When the 
compressors went into action the three tugs 
and three steamers also got busy. The Mari- 
tana simply had to come off the rocks. 

The only similar case where a rotary was 
"converted" is said to have been the job done 
by Captain -lames Reid, of Port Huron, in re- 
leasing the John Sineaton. near Marquette, a 
lew years aeo. 



Re-Inspection of Steamers. 



Toledo vesselmen regard the steamer Pasa- 
dena as being hoodooed. On September 15 

(he steamer sank in Green Bay. After being 
raised she narrowly escaped going down 
again on Lake Huron on her way to Lake 
Erie. Upon reaching Detroit River she 
grounded twice. Arriving there the boat 
went into drydock to get fixed up again and 
celebrated her return to business by ramming 
Cherry Street bridge. These injuries are not 
especially serious and repairs will not be 
made until she reaches Chicago, but the city 
has a bill of $2,000 to present to her owners 
for damage to the bridge. 



Inquiries are being received in Detroit \\<r 
Storage room \'ov Canadian wheat in bond, 
and it is likely that a large quantity will be 
unloaded there by vessels this fall. The enor- 
mous crops of the Canadian Northwest will 
sorely fax elevator capacity, which is causing 
shippers and agents to look around for storage 
space. 



A reinspection of all steamers in the Unit- 
ed States was ordered on September 26, by the 
Department of Commerce and Labor, in a 
letter which Secretary Metcalf directed to 
George Uhler, Supervising Inspector General 

if flic Steamboat Inspection Service. No 

genera) inspection has been had since the 
revision of rules made in May to harmonize 
i hem with laws passed by the last Congress, 
following the General Slocum disaster at New 
York. 

The Secretary's letter to Mr. Uhler follows: 
"In order that I may be fully advised of 
the result of the application if the revise! 
rules and regulations of the Steamboat Inspec- 
tion Service, and with a view of as- 
CCrtaining whether the Supervising Inspect- 
ors .if the various districts, together with the 
heal force under their supervision, have car- 
ried out all the requirements of the law and 
the rules and regulations of the Department 
based thereon, you arc directed to order, 
through tic Supervising Inspectors of the 
various districts, a reinspection, so far as may 

he possible, of all the steamers in the different 

districts. 

The execution of this order will be left to 
you. When this reinspection is completed, you 
will please make a detailed reporl to me. giv- 
ing, among ether things, the names of any 
Supervising Inspector or Local Inspectors, if 
any, in whose district the boats are found to 
be below (he required standard of efficiency. 

It is requested thai you order this rein- 
spection at oi ." 

The Supervising Inspector General at once 
issued orders to the Supervising Inspectors of 
the various districts direct ing them to proceed 
immediately to carry out Secretary Metcalf's 
instructions. The Inspectors were told that 
they were expected pa rt icula rly to examine 
the life-preservers and fire-hose, and to witness 
fire drills on the vessels. 



Referring to a recent note in these columns 
concerning the youthfulness of the master of 
the steamer Sharpless. a correspondent writes 
that Captain Charles Rattray, of the steamer 
Homer Warren, is twenty-six years of age; 
Captain Thomas E. Goodwin, who sailed the 

Nicaragua in 190T-1904. beca master of 

that vessel when twenty-seven years of age; 
Captain Scott B. Worden, now master of the 
Northern Light, took his first command in 
1902, at the age of twenty-seven years. The 
two first-named masters bail from Port Hu- 
ron,, Mich., and the last-named from 9fc 
Clair, Midi. 



A new plan for the handling of freight will 
he reported out by a special committee of flic 
Lumber Carriers-' Association at the annual 

meeting of the close of the season. The com- 
mittee consists of Messrs. .1. A. Calbrick and 
W. 1). Hamilton, of Chicago, and C T. Wil- 
liams, of Cleveland. 



Captain Theodore Porter. I'm' several years 
Lighthouse Inspector for the Buffalo District. 
has been succeeded by Commander Thomas S. 

Kneeis. nf Washington, D. C. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Marine Notes. 



The steamer State of New York has arrived 
at Detroit to go into winter quarters. The 
City of Alpena has also completed her last 
trip of the season to Mackinac and way ports. 

The Dominion Government is likely to al- 
low $10,000 to the widow of Captain Clollard, 
who was killed by the explosion on the Gov- 
ernment steamer Scout last April. 

The steamer Arundel, of Buffalo, has been 
chartered by Detroit parties and will be used 
in the fruit trade during the remainder of 
the season. Captain Armstrong commands 
her. 

The demands of the "top men" on the 
docks of the South Shore line at Marquette 
have been granted and the men returned to 
their work. The advance is ten cents an 
hour. 

Captain S. J. Milieu has resigned as mas- 
ter of the Steel Trust barge Fritz, and is suc- 
ceeded by Captain J. R. Parker, of the steam- 
er Maritana, which was recently ashore near 
Detour. 

Frank Johnson, a seaman forty-six years 
of age, was seriously, if not fatally, hurt re- 
cently at Milwaukee by falling from the mast- 
to the deck of the steamer Mauch Chunk. 
Johnson's home is in Buffalo. 

Captain Bongard of the steamer Turbinia, 
whose license was suspended for nine months 
by the commission which investigated 'the 
Tnrbinia-Primrose collision, has appealed his 
case, alleging unfair treatment. 

Colonel G. J. Lydecker, in charge of the 
United States Lake Survey at Detroit, an- 
nounces that he has a revised chart of the St. 
Lawrence, which can be obtained for fifteen 
cents a copy. 

Another schooner Olive Jeanette victim has 
been identified as George Gabrielson, of G2B 
Indiana avenue, Toledo. He was formerly 
mate of the schooner Edwards, which vessel 
he left on August 20 to ship on the lost schoon- 
er. 

The schooner Challenge, of Manitowoc, 
was towed into Menominee recently badly 
waterlogged. She was bound from Detroit 
harbor to Green Bay and ran aground on 
Peshtigo Reef, being raised after jettisoning 
part of the cargo of cordwood. 

By means of photographs taken before in- 
terment in the cemetery at L'Anse, Mich., Mr. 
and Mrs. Elijah Hough, of Saginaw, have 
identified their son, Benjamin A. Hough, as 
one of those lost on the steamer Iosco, in the 
storm on Lake Superior last month. 

The Board of Service at Lorain has taken 
the first step toward keeping the river free 
of ice this winter. A tug will be maintained 
there for the purpose of breaking the ice and 
invitations have been sent out to vesselowners 
to lay up their boats at Lorain for winter 
repairs. 

The old steamer Peerless, recently pur- 
chased by L. B. Clark, of Chicago, at United 
States Marshal's sale, has again changed 
hands. The new purchaser is Thomas B. 
Banner, who represents a new corporation 
which intends to operate a line to St. Joseph, 
Mich. 

The recent shooting of Captain Matthew 
Ross, master of the schooner B. W. Parker, on 
Lake Superior by William McQuinn, a mem- 
ber of the crew, was accidental. McQuinn was 
exonerated by a coroner's jury at an inquest 
held on board the Parker at Marquette. The 
two men were shooting at sparrows at the 
time of the fatality. 



TONAWANDA LETTER LIST. 



Anderson, H. B. 
Andrasen, Nills S. 
Atcheson, Fred 
Brown, Clarence J. 
Bergorstrom, Oscar 
Baase, Paul 
Brown, Fred C. 
Bandon, Fred 
Brown, Joe 
Brinniers, Heer K. 
Carlsen, Carl 
Coburn, J. 
Cobb, James W. 
Cunningham, John 
Clare, Frank 
Conger, Joseph 
Champine, Tony 
Cattanach, Ralph 
Christensen, Chas. 
Curire, John 
Corran, F. 
Charlson, Karl A. 
Danielsson, J. 
Donaldson, Chas. B. 
Daugherty, James 
Drucks, Louis 
Engclson, J. M. 
Fjeldsgaard. Adolf 
Furtaw, Parker 
Farran, James 
Glanz, Edw„ Jr. 
Gillgren, Peter 
Green, J. S. 
Gay, Harry B. 
Housen, Thergrlm 
Hansen, Martin 
Heeley, Edmond 
Hillman, J. R. 
Hansan, A. 
Hansen, Karl Otto 



Herring, S. A. 
Hillman, Henry 
Hanson, P. 
Jacobson, August 
Johnson, Joe 
Johanssan, Carl 
Karlsen, Karl A. 
Knudsen, H. 
Kozlaske, Michael 
Karlsson, G. P. 
Leeland, W .M. 
Lundgren, Victor 
Lafarge, John 
Labo, Peter 
Maese, Max 
Mathiasen, Oscar 
Magnassan, C. J. 
McGrath, R. 
McLawby, Ed. 
McDonald. MurdocK 
McLeod, Thos, 
McNamara, Michael 
Nicholson. Andrew 
Milsen, Nils. 
Nilsen, Welenius 
Pedersen, A. H. 
Palmatier, George 
Pederson, N. A. 
Omonsen, Tollak 
Rankin, Jae. W. 
Sullivan, S. P. 
Sarsen, Dick. 
Shannon, H. P. 
Stalls, William 
Sheldon, H. S. 
Tovatt, Frank 
Van Antyerp, Chas. 
Waters, Frank 
Young, James 



CONNEAUT LETTER LIST. 



Anderson. Robt. 
Badgley. Frank 
Boufford, Fred 
Corey, Donald D. 
Cromwell, Birdsey 
Dorekermann, Geo. 
Dahl, Ernest 
Fuller, Achil 
Hill, Harry 
Hughes, Jas. J. 
Isaacs, Freeman J. 
Ingman, Gust. 



Janes, E. G. 
McNeeley, Matt . 
Moriarity, Danl. 
Meyers, Chas. 
McGuire, J. J. 
Muskon, F. 
Parsons, C. H. 
Paulson, Hans 
Roberts, Harry 
Whitcomb, Harry M. 
Wadsworth, Frank 



DETROIT LETTER LIST. 



Whitcomb. Harry M. 

Hansen. Carl 

Easu, Al. 

A dead letter ad- 
dressed to Wm. G. 
Weber. 

Larsen, Crean 

McManus, Wm. 

Gallagher. J. C.-2 

Westover. Alex. 

Olsen, Waldmar-2 

Brown, W. H. J. 

Johnnieson, Hilne 

Thomas, James-2 



Wald, Frank 
Ayers, E. E. 
Anderson, Harold 
Nadu, N., Jr. 
Nicklson, Donald 
Roland, Frank M. 
Almand, Albert 
Dovle, Jos. 
Blakly, A. 
Johnson, Victor 
Farwell, Roy 
Lenard, L. 
Pehnssen, John 
Squrr, W. J. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lakes District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

121 and 123 North Desplaines Street, Chicago, 111. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 



BRANCHES. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 93G R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, O. 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 171 East River Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1295. 

TOLEDO, 719 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6981. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone Peoples 4615. 

BAY CITY, MICH 919 North Water Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y ..94 Hamilton Street 

SUB-AGENCIES. 

MANITOWOC, WIS 809 South Eighth Street 

ERIE, PA 107 East Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 

SANDUSKY, 1107 Adams Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 931 Military Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL; DETROIT, MICH.; CLEVELAND, O. 



RELIEF 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Erie, Pa. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistel, Mich. 



STATIONS. 

Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, .Mich. 
Sheboygan. Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



"We Don 't Pa tronize. 

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 
Bread— McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo.; 

National Biscuit Company, Chicago 111 
Cigars— Carl Upman of New York City; Kerbs 

Wertheim & Schiffer. of New York City; The Henry 

George and Tom Moore. 
Floor— Washburn, Crosby Milling Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn.; Kelley Milling Co., Kansas City, Mo 
Groceries — James Butler, New York City 
Meats— Kingan Packing Company, of "Indianapolis. 

Pipes— Wm. Demuth & Co.. New York 
Tobacco— American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 



CLOTHING. 
Buttons—Davenport Pearl Button Company, Daven- 
port, Iowa; Krementz & Co., Newark, N. J 
Clothing— N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.- 
p A 1 T, r ? Exchange. Rochester. N. Y. ; Strawbridge 

& Clothier, Philadelphia, Pa.; Blauner Bros., New 

York. 
Corsets — Chicago Corset Company. 
G1 ° v f. s r^ J - H - c °wnie Glove Co.. Des Moines, Iowa- 

California Glove Co., Napa, Cal. 
H ^ S T", J - B - ste tson Company, Philadelphia, Pa ; E 

M. Knox Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Shirts and Collars— United Shirt and Collar Company 

Troy, N. Y. ; Van Zandt. Jacobs & Co., Troy N Y ' 

Cluett. Peabody & Co., Troy, N. Y.; James R. 

Kaiser, New York City. 
Shoes — Harney Bros., Lynn, Mass.; J. E. Tilt Shoe 

Co., Chicago, 111. 
Suspenders— Russell Mfg. Co., Middletown, Conn 
Textiles— Merrimao Manufacturing Company (printed 

goods), Lowell, Mass. ' 

Underwear — Oneita Knitting Mills, Utica N Y 
Woolens— Hartford Carpet Co., Thompsonville, 'conn ■ 

J. Capps & Son, Jacksonville, 111. 



PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders— Geo. M. Hill Co., Chicago, 111.; Boorum 
& Pease Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Newspapers— Philadelphia Democrat. Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Hudson, Kimberly & Co., printers, of Kansas 
City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey Co., publishers, Hammond, 
Inch; Gazette, Terre Haute, Ind.; Times, Los An- 
creles C7al. 

POTTERY, GLASS, STONE, AND CEMENT. 

Pottery and Brick— J. B. Owens Pottery Co. of Zanes- 
ville, Ohio; Northwestern Terra Cotta Co., of Chi- 
cago, 111. j C. W. Stine Pottery Co., White Cottage, 
Ohio; Harbison-Walker Refractory Co, Pittsburg 
Pa.; Utica Hydraulic Cement and Utica Cement 
Mfg. Co., Utica, 111. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 
Carriage and Wagon Builders— S. R. Bailey & Co.. 
Amesbury, Mass.; Hassett & Hodge, Amesbury, 
Mass.; Carr, Prescott & Co., Amesbury, Mass. 
General Hardware— Landers, Frary & Clark, ^Etna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Iver Johnson Arms 
Company, Fitchburg, Mass.; Kelsey Furnace Com- 
pany, Syracuse, N. Y.; Brown & Sharpe Tool Com- 
pany, Providence. R. I.; John Russell Cutlery Com- 
pany Turner's Falls, Mass.; Atlas Tack Company, 
Fairhayen, Mass.; Henry Disston & Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa.; American Hardware Co. (Russell & Er- 
win Co. and P. & F. Corbin Co.), New Britain, Conn.; 
Merritt & Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, of 
Carpentersville, 111.; Carborundum Company, Niag- 
ara Falls, N. Y.; Casey & Hedges. Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; Gurney Foundry Company. Toronto, Ont.; 
hattley Manufacturing Company, Springfield, Ohio; 
Page Needle Company, Franklin, N. H. ; American 
Circular Loom Company, New Orange, N. J.; Payne 
Engine Company, Elmira, N. Y.; Lincoln Iron Works 
<V R- Patch Manufacturing Company), Rutland, 
Vt.; Art Metal Construction Company, Jamestown, 
N. Y. ; Erie City Iron Works, Erie, Pa.; David May- 
dole Hammer Co., Norwich, N. Y. ; Singer Sewing 
Machine Company, Elizabeth, N. J.: National Ele- 
vator and Machine Company, Honesdale, Pa.; Pitts- 
burg Expanded Metal Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 
Iron, Architectural — Geo. L. Meskir, Evansville, Ind. 
Stoves — Germer Stove Company, Erie, Pa.; "Radiant 
Home Stoves, Ranges and Hot Air Blast, Erie, Pa ; 
Wrought Iron Range Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
WOOD AND FURNITURE. 
Bags — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 

Bemis Bros., St. Louis, Mo. 
Baskets — Williams Manufacturing Company, North- 
ampton, Mass. 
Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster 
Company, of Davenport, Iowa; M. Goeller's Sons 
Circleville, Ohio; Merkle-Wiley Broom Co., Paris 
Illinois. 
Carriages— Crane, Breed & Co.. Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Cooperage — Northwestern Cooperage and Lumber 
Company (otherwise known as the I'.uckeve Stave 
Company), of Ohio, Michigan, and Wisconsin; Elgin 
Butter Tub Company, Flgin, 111.; Williams Cooper- 
age Company and Palmer Manufacturing Company, 
of Poplar Bluff, Mo. 
China — Wick China Company. Kit tanning. Pa. 
Furniture — American Billiard Tabic Company, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio; Brumby Chair Company, Marietta, C.a ; 
O. Wisner Piano Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Krell 
Piano Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; N. Drucker <fc Co., 
Cincinnati, Ohio, trunks; St. Johns Table Company 
St. Johns, Mich.; Grand Rapids Furniture Manufac- 
turing Association, Grand Kapids, Mich.; Derby 
Desk Co.. Boston, Mass. 
Gold Leaf — W. H. Kemp Company, New York, N. Y. ; 
Andrew Reeves, Chicago, III.; George Beeves Cape 
May, N. J.; Hastings Company, Philadelphia. Pa ; 
Henry Ayers, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lumber — Trinity County Lumber Company, Grove- 
ton, Texas; Reinle Bros. & Solomon. Baltimore, 
Md.; Himmelberger Harrison 1, umber Company 
Morehouse, Mo.; Union Lumber Company, Port 
Bragg, Cal. 
Leather — Kullman, Salz <V- Co., Benicia, Cal ; A P. 
Patrick & Co., San Francisco. Cal.; Columbus Buggy 
and Harness Company, Columbus, Ohio; Perch 
Bros., Baltimore, Md. 
Rubber — Kokomo Rubber Company, Kokomo, Ind.; B. 
F. Goodrich Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio; Dia- 
mond Rubber Company, Akron. Ohio, 
Paper Boxes — 10. N. Powell & Co.. Batavia, N. Y.J J. 

N. Roberts & Co.. Metropolis, III. 
Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Co., Norfolk N Y- 
Potter Wall Paper Co., Hoboken. X. .1. 

Typewriters Underwood Typewriter Company, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Crescent Courvolseer Wilcox Com- 
pany; job. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Company, 
Sag Harbor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Advertising Novelties — Novelty Advertising Com- 
pany, Coshocton, Ohio. 

Burlap — H. B. Wiggins- Sons' Company, Bloomfleld 

N. J. 
Bill pasters Bryan & Co., Cleveland, Ohio, 
Railways Atchison, Topeka and Bants Fe Railroad; 

Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Comps 
Telegraphy — Western Union Telegraph Company, and 

its Messenger Service. 
D. M. Parry, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Wellman, Osborne & CO., P. vim, Mass.; Thomas Taylor 

& Son, Hudson. Mass. 
C. W. Post, Mannt i< i in • > or <:,.:,,,■ Nuts and Postum 

Cereal, Battle Creek, Mich. 
Let.maier-Swartz & Co., New York City. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






On tne Atlantic Coast. 



(Continued from page 3.) 



loss upon the concern. The summons was 
made returnable before Justice Gummere, at 
Trenton, N. J., on October 10. Justice Gnm- 
mere, it may be remembered, is the magistrate 
who about a year ago gained a national, al- 
beit rather unpleasant, notoriety by assessing 
the value of a child's life at $1, in a damage 
suit brought by the child's parenta against a 
railroad corporation. Notwithstanding this 
fact, the members of Typographical Union 
No. 94 regard the damage suit of the Jersey 
City Printing Company as more bluff than 
anything else. 



The plot begins to thicken ! It is now 
credibly asserted that Japan would welcome 
legislation by the United States to keep out 
Japanese immigrants from this country, pro- 
vided it can be done in a manner that would 
not be offensive to Japan or affect her dignity. 
After that, it is almost a foregone conclusion 
that our friends, the trusts, Avill insist on the 
immediate enactment of a sufficiently "of- 
fensive" Japanese Exclusion bill to cause the 
Japanese Government to demand "modifica- 
tions" such as the Chinese Government is 
now seeking to effect in cur Chinese Exdu 
sion Act. 



The recent clubbing of laborers in Colon 
because they would not go to work on the 
Canal was an object lesson which should ef- 
fectually silence those unpatriotic scoffers 
who affirm that our home brand of civilization 
does not necessarily follow the flag. YVhal 
more vivid illustration of our peculiar form 
of civilization could be wished for than the 
spectacle of a number of defenseless laborers 
unwilling to work being clubbed into submis- 
sion by a squad of ' ' cops ? ' ' 



Any plan of government which makes no 
allowance for the natural inequalities among 
men in the matters of strength and talents is 
bound to fail, for only those governments can 
endure under which strength and talents are 
encouraged to rise above mediocrity. 



The average reformer has less patience with 
those who believe a part of his creed than with 
those who deny the whole of it. And it must 
be admitted that an ingrained mugwump is 
enough to ruffle anybody's temper. 



It is the sad privilege of some minds to he 
permitted to clearly see and anticipate a 
brighter order of things for humanity, while 
knowing that they themselves will not live to 

enjoy it. 



No man can be happy who does not sym- 
pathize with the happiness of others, and do 
man can be wise who does not profit from the 
mistakes and follies of others. 



A great part of Andrew Furuseth's Labor 
Day address was quoted and approvingly com- 
mented upon by the labor editor of the New 
York Evening Journal. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



Fag Ends. 



Liberty, to be well enjoyed, must be well 
deserved. 



The recent disclosures in high life insurance 
show why the course of a straight Corrupt 
Practices bill never yet did run smooth 
through a crooked Legislature. 



Work for the Initiative and Referendum 
and the Recall! 



No emotion stirs an envious soul like watch- 
ing tile BU( ss of others. 



Pride makes a fool ridiculous hut prevents 
a wise man from becoming so. 



A virtuous soul with wisdom armed was 
never yet by evil harmed. 



No man is so good that he feels had when 
he hears his enemies abused. 

'Tis had to die without a mourner, yet 

worse to live without a friend. 



Where rules conflict with common sense, 

let common sense decide the issue. 



There is but one pursuit in life that pays; 
to find, 1 then to follow-. Virtue's ways. 



That man. indeed, '•needs little here bc- 

>w" who is respected by both friend and foe. 



Weak is the truth 1 hat rests but on the 
fame which hoary Time has lent to some great 
name. 



The worshipers of the Golden Calf may 
justly be proud of the fact that there is not 
a single hypocrite among them. 



Where an improbable truth may find a few 

lukewarm believers a plausible falsehood will 
sometimes deceive a whole nation. 



Who can compute the total cost of all the 
time that has been losl by men who seek re- 
lief from care by building castles in the air! 



None are so credulous as the average the- 
orist with respect to what confirms his theory, 
and none so incredulous of facts that oppose 
it. 



Most "reforms"" are like Down Last 

grapes: they are seldom ripe, and by the 1i 

they become so they an' generally out of sea- 
son. 



Work is the most moral and humanizing in- 
stitution of Providence, as the desire of get- 
ting something for nothing is the most demor- 
alizing sentiment that can be cultivated. 



ruder our present meretricious system of 
government and society men of talent will 
succeed better in public life than men of prin- 
ciple, and men of great wealth better than 
either. 



What Nature gives in one direction she gen- 
erally withholds in another; and the man who 
would conscientiously employ vested power 
for the good of his fellowmen usually lacks 
the initiative to acquire it — and vice versa. 



Nothing makes a man feel so humble as the 
realization of how much there is to learn, and 
how little can be learned in his short span of 
life, unless it be the realization of his insignif- 
icance and helplessness when trying to com- 
prehend the infinite. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OE AMERICA. 

Affiliated with the 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. ERAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer. 
1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
BOSTON, MASS, 1 Vj A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
BANGOR, ME.. 211 Broad St. 
PORTLAND. ME., 377A Fore St. 
NEW BEDFORD. MASS., 7 South Water St. 
PROVIDENCE R- I-. 464 South Main St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51-52 South Si. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 68 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., 12ft Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE. MD., 604 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, VA„ 228 Water St. 
MOBILE!, ALA., 104 Commerce St. 
NEW' ORLEANS, LA.. 937 TohOUpltOUlaS St. 
BRUNSWICK. GA. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N .Y., 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON. MASS.. 284 Commercial St. 
JERSEY CITY. N. J., 35 Hudson St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE. MD., 1736 Thames St. 
NORFOLK, VA„ 89 Church St. 
NEWPORT NEWS, VA., 2314 Washington Ave. 
MOBILE. ALA.. 104 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters : 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 166 Christopher St. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON. MASS., Commercial Wharf. 

Branch: 
GLOUCESTER, MASS., 141% Main St 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL. N. Y. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 
CHICAGO. ILL., 121-123 North Desplalnes St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE. WIS., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO. N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR. O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 171 East River St. 
TOLEDO. O.. 719 Summit St. 
NORTH TON A WANDA, N. Y.. 152 Main St. 
DETROIT. MICH., 7 Wondbridjre St., East. 
SUPERIOR, WIS., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND. WIS.. 515 East Second St. 
OGDENSBUR6, N. Y.. 94 Hamilton s> 
n\v CITY. MK'H.. 919 North Water St. 
MANITOWOC. WIS., S09 South Eighth St. 
ERIE, PA., 107 East Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, ill.. 9142 Mackinaw St. 
CONNBAUT HARBOR, o. 992 Day St. 
sandtsky, O., 11"7 Adam s St. 
PORT HURON, MICH.. »31 Military St 



:arine COOKS' AND STEWARDS' union of 
THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters : 
BUFFALO, N. Y.. 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, MICH., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO. O.. 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
dCDENSBURG, N. Y.. 94 Hamilton St. 
LAY CITY, MICH., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O, Tel. 305. 
CLEVELAND, O.. Atwater Bid*.. Room 1. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 42 Wells St. Tel. Main 3B37. 
MILWAUKEE, WIS., 317 Florida St. 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT, O., 981 Day St. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters : 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL., Southwest corner Easl 

ami Mission Sts. 

Branches: 
TACOMA, WASH , 8004 M. Carver St 
SEATTLE, WASH., 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNSEND. WASH., 111 Qulncy St. 
ABERDEEN, WASH., P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND, OR., 40 Union Ave. 
EUREKA, CAL., P. O. Box 327. 
SAN PEDRO .CAT,.. P. O. Box 23S0. 
HONOLULU, H. T, P. O. Box 96. 



PACIFIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.. 46 Steuart St 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, WASH., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters : 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 54 Mission St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. WASH., Colman Dork, Room 9. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL, P. O. Box 2155. 



FISHERMEN'S PROTECTIVE UNION OF THE 
PACIFIC COAST AND ALASXA. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 9 Mission St 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, WASH., P. O. Box 4 2. 
ASTORIA. OR., P. O. Box 183. 

BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 54 Mission St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO. CAL, 200 M St. 



THE COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALIA 

39 Ersklne Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



Brunt, W. N. 
Budde, H. F., 
Church Press, 
Collins, C. J., 



List of Union Offices 

ALLIED PRINTING TRADES 

COUNCIL 

of San Francisco, Cal. 



Abbott, F. H., 314-316 Battery. 
Altvater Printing Co., 2593-2595 Mission 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

American Printing House, 10G7 Market. 

Art Printery, The, 41-43 Eighth. 

Barnhart & Swasey,' 107 New Montgom- 
ery. 

Barry, Jas. H., The Star Press, 429 
Montgomery. 

Belcher & Phillips, 508 Clay. 

Ben Franklin Press, 123 Seventh. 

Bensen & Liss, 776 Bryant. 

Berry Bros., 320 Sansome. 

Bickell, L. A., 19 First. 

Black Cat Press, 402 McAllister. 

Boulin-Leichner Co., 519 Filbert. 

Brown, Andrew Printing Co., First and 
Mission. 

Co., 102-104 Second. 
Cal. Press, 407 Vz Turk. 
23 Davis. 
16 Hayes. 

Cook, The Morton L., 144 Second. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Cubery & Co., 587 Mission. 

Danish Printing Co., 410 Kearny. 

Daily Racing News, 21-23 First. 

Day & McClinton, 538 Sacramento. 

Drake & Baker, 850 Market. 

Drum Bros., 638 Mission. 

Eagle Printing Co., The, 344 Kearny. 

Eastman, Frank & Co., 509 Clay. 

Eastman & Mitchell, 415 Market. 

Fording & Halle, 22 Clay. 

Francis- Valentine Co., 5 Anna Lane, off 
Eddy. 

Gabriel Printing Co., 320 Sansome. 

Gallowav Publishing Co., 146 Second. 

Gilmartin Publishing Co., The, 19 First. 

Guedet Printing Co., 935 Market. 

Golden State Printing Co., 73 Third. 

Golden West Press, 146 Second. 

Granger & Caldwell, 526 Montgomery. 

Hancock Bros., 809 Mission. 

Harvey, John D, 509 Clay. 

Hayden Printing Co., 417 Montgomery. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

Hiester, Wm. A., 529 California. 

Hughes, E. C. & Co., 511 Sansome. 

Illinois Pacific Glass Works, 10-16 Main 

Jalumstein Printing Co., 310 Hayes. 

Knarston Printing Co., 529 Washington. 

Lafontain, J. R., 603 Merchant. 

Latham & Emanuel, 511 Sacramento. 

Leader, The, 532 Commercial. 

Leilich & Colburn, City Hall Square. 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

Levingston, L., 540 Clay. 

Luce & Her Co., 406 Sansome. 

Lynch, James T., 514 Kearny. 

Lyon, W. T. & Co., 161 First. 

Majestic Press, The, 1566 Market. 

McCracken Printing Co., 509 Kearny. 

Medina & Co., 221 Sacramento. 

Meyerfield, Albert M , 414 Pine. 

Monahan, John & Co., 412 Commercial. 

Moore-Hinds Co., 149 Natoma. 

Morris & Bain, 320 Sansome. 

Murdock, C. A. & Co., 532 Clay. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Nevin, C. W. & Co., 532 Commercial. 

Occidental Mystic Press, 6 Cottage Row 

Pacific Goldsmith Publishing Co., 146 
Second. 

Partridge, John, 306 California. 

Pernau Bros., 543 Clay. ' 

Phelan, F. M., Ill Cook. 

Phillips & Van Orden, 508 Clay. 

Police Bulletin of San Francisco, Hall 
of Justice. 

Polyglott Press. 628 Montgomery. 

Recorder Publishing Co., 516 Commer- 
cial. 

Roesch, Louis Co., 321-25 Sansome. 

Rooney, J. V. Co., 1308 Mission. 

Samuel, Wm., 411% California. 

San Francisco Newspaper Union, 405- 
407 Sansome. 

Schreiber, P. H, 809 Mission. 

Shanly, J. M., 414 Clay. 

Smyth, Owen H., 511 Sacramento. 

Spaulding, Geo. & Co., 414 Clay. 

Springer & Co., 240 Ellis. 

Standard Printing Co., 518 Clay. 

Stanley-Taylor Co., 656 Mission. 

Sterett Co., W. I., 933 Market. 

Sterling Press, 229 Stevenson. 

Stuetzel & Co., 144 Second. 

Sunset Press, 1327 Market. 

Sutter Press, The, 240 Stockton. 

Tomoye Press, 144 Union Square av. 

Town Talk Printing Co., 146 Second. 

Turner, H. S., 3232 Mission. 

Valleau & Peterson, 410 Sansome. 

Wale Printing Co., 621 Clay. 

Wenderoth & Brown, 319 California. 

Werner, Geo. A., 1067 Howard. 

Western Fine Arts Co., 529 Clay. 

Williams, Joseph, 142 Seventh. 

Wilson, Geo. F., 405 Front. 

Winkler, Chas. W., 146 Second. 

Winterburn, Jos., 417 Clay. 

Woodward, W. A. & Co., 12 Sutter. 
Bookbinders. 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

Brown & Power Co., 508 Clay. 

Buswell & Co., 536 Clay. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

McGreenev, Wm. H., 23 Stevenson. 

Kitchen, Jr. Co., John, 510-514 Com- 
mercial. 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

Mclntyre, J. B., 424 Sansome. 

Malloye, F., 422 Sacramento. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Phillips Bros., 505 Clay. 

Rotermundt, Hugo L., 413 Sacramento. 

Webster, Fred L., 19 First. 

Whelan, Richard I. & Co., 42 Steuart. 

San Francisco Mailing Co., 609 Mission. 
5th floor. 

Photo Engravers and Etchers. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery, near Mission. 

Bolton & Strong, 621 Clay. 

California Engraving Co., 506 Market. 

San Francisco Etching Co., 109 New 
Montgomery. 

McCabe & Sons, 611 Merchant. 

Sierra Engraving Co., 324 Grant av. 

Sunset Engraving Co., 108 Union Square 
av. 

Union Engraving Co., 144 Union Square 
av. 

Yosemite Engraving Co., 24 Montgom- 
ery. 

Electrotypers and Stereotypers. 

American Press Association, 19 First. 

Hoffschnelder Bros., 412 Commercial. 

Martin & Co., 508 Clay. 



PAINT- 



■This Trademark. 

On Your ~ 
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General News. 



OF THE 



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SCANDINAVIAN AMERICAN SAVINGS BANK 

Cor. Bash and Montgomery Sts. (Mills Building) 
SAN FBANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Capital, $300,000. Total Assets, $1,000,000 

Directors Advisory Board 

Charles Nelson Martin Sanders E. W. Ferguson J. Jensen 

Lewis I. Cowgill W. H. Little Fr. C. Siebe A. T. Dunbar 

J. C. Eschen Henry Wilson Mikal Olsen J. C. Everding 

Geo. H. Tyson S. D. Denson, Attorney 

Saving Accounts Solicited. Commercial deposits subject to check. Inter- 
est paid on savings and commercial balances, and allowed from date of de- 
posit. Drafts, Telegraphic Exchange and Letters of Credit issued, payable 
in New York, London, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and all the prin- 
cipal cities of Europe and America. Open Saturday evenings from 6:30 to 8, 
for deposits. 




Notice! Notice! 
REMOVED 

THE UNITED STATES 
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9 SPEAR ST., Buckley Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



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REMOVED TO 

9 Spear Street, Buckley Bldg. 

PHONE MONTGOMERY 1242 

SAN FRANCISCO 



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The Scandinavian 
Sailors' Home 

Cor. Drumm and Commercial Sts. 

Telephone James 4846. 

A new building erected especially for sail- 
ors. Latest improvements, clean and li^ht 
rooms, bath, reading and dining roomi 
First-class board and lodging at reasonable 
rates. Gospel service — Sundays. 8:46 p. m.. 
and Wednesdays, 8 o'clock p. m. All wel- 
come. 

A. ANDERSON 



Missionary and Manager. 



King Oscar of Sweden formally re- 
sumed the reins of Government on Octo- 
ber 14. 

The Missouri building at the Lewis and 
(lark Exposition, at Portland, Or., was 
destroyed by fire on October 13. 

The Russo-Japanese peace treaty was 
signed by the Czar and the Mikado on 
October 14, thus formally ending the war. 

After vicissitudes of a few years, the 
Boer colonists of the State of Chihuahua, 
Mexico, are disbanding through inability 
to secure a clear title. 

The disclosures before the insurance 
investigators are injuring American in- 
surance business abroad, according to ad- 
vicea from London, Eng. 

The Costa Eican Government has or- 
dered a census of the Chinese in that 
country, in order that those who have en- 
tered illegally may be expelled. 

The sum of $10,000 has been received 
at Rome, Italy, from J. P. Morgan for 
the benefit of the sufferers from the re- 
cent earthquakes in the Province of 
Calabria. 

The International Harvester Company 
has purchased the Vulcan Works near 
Noorkoping, Sweden. A Swedish cor- 
poration will be formed to manufacture 
harvesting machinery. 

The Peoria (111.) National Bank has 
closed its doors, an indictment for for- 
gery having been found against its presi- 
dent, N. C. Dougherty, superintendent of 
schools. 

Luke E. Wright, Governor-General of 
the Philippines and president of the 
Philippine Commission, will retire from 
that position about December 1, on ac- 
count of dissatisfaction with the situa- 
tion in the Philippines. 

The Holland American Construction 
Company, backed by Westinghouse inter- 
ests, has been organized in New York to 
construct the most extensive electric rail- 
way system ever projected by Americans 
in Continental Europe. 

The Southern Pacific Railway Com- 
pany has made a deposit with the Chi- 
huahua (Mex.) State Government 
amounting to $540,000 to guarantee the 
construction of the railway line between 
Guaymas and Guadalajara. 

The desertions from the United States 
army during the year ending December 
31, 1904, were 6,842; for the five years 
ending December 21, 1901, 27,388. An 
increase in the pay of privates is sug- 
gested by certain military authorities as 
a remedy for this condition. 

Herr Bebel, leader of the German 
Social Democrats, has inherited another 
250,000 marks, under the will of an ec- 
centric man named Kollmann, who, hav- 
ing quarreled with his relatives, made 
Bebel his heir to spite them, though he 
had no sympathy with the Socialists. 

The report of the Bureau of Immigra- 
tion for August shows that 63,409 aliens 
landed during the month, as compared 
with 59,777 for August, 1904. The great- 
est number arrived from Russia, with 
Italy second and Austria third. From 
China there were 215 landed, as compared 
with 520 for August last year. 

The Merchants' Association of New 
York has adopted resolutions calling on 
the District Attorney of New York 
county to ascertain whether an indictment 
.an not be found against officers of the 
life insurance companies who have con- 
tributed of the funds of the companies 
In the political campaigns. 

it is said that President Roosevelt will 
recommend to Congress the removal of 
that provision of the Chinese Exclusion 
I, aw which requires intending emigrants 
(if the excepted classes to secure permits 
I'll, in the Chinese Government, on the 
ground that such procedure involves 
great expense without advantage to the 
Exclusion law. 



k 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's WorKers 

The Sydney (N. 8. W.) tabor Council 

has passed a resolution protesting against 
the Slate Government 'b treatment of the 
unemployed. 

The workmen in the sugar factories of 
Russian Poland struck on October 12. 
They demand an eight-hour day and an 
increase in wages. 

The Workmen's Federation at Buenos 
Ay res started a general strike on Octo- 
ber 9. Congress has declared martial 
law throughout the country for ninety 
' days. 

"Generally speaking, the labor laws of 
the Colony are working smoothly, and 
with exceedingly little friction," says 
the August number of Journal of the 
Department of Labor, New Zealand. 

Representatives of the Sydney (N. 8. 
W.) unemployed declare that many of 
the unemployed are suffering acute |">\ 
,rty, they and their families existing on 
bread and tea, the gift of kind-hearted 
neighbors. 

The 1107 classified State school teach- 
ers in Queensland receive £171,293 yearly 
in wages, while 7(55 other civil servants 
draw £162,261 between them; "V a total 
Of £333,564 annually for all those, under 
the Public Service Act. 

The Sydney (N. S. W.) Labor Council 
has passed a resolution protesting 
against the locomotive contract being 
given to the privately-muted Clyde Com- 
pany, and urging that the work I"' dune 
by the State railway workshops. 

A boss carpenter at Duuediu, N. /.. 
was recently fined E30 tor employing a 
workman at lower than the wages fixed 
by the Arbitration Court, and the em- 
ploye concerned was fined Ms. tor ac- 
cepting less than the law provided. 

Doctors in the hospital at Bordeaux, 
France, to the number of 100, struck 
on October 7, owing to the refusal ol 
the directors to satisfy their claims. The 
authorities have called upon private 
practitioners to undertake the care or 
patients. 

Altogether it has cost only £3283 t<> 
administer the New Zealand Industrial 
Conciliation and Arbitration Act during 
the twelve months ending March 31, 
L906. Two hundred and ninety live cases 
were investigated and dealt with during 
that period. 

The majority of the factories at Mos 
COW, especially in the great industrial 
quarter of Zamoskvoretch, which is 
across the river from the rest of that 
city, have joined in the strike of printers 
and bakers. The movement threatens to 
become general, though it is opposed by 
a strong minority of the workmen. 

The New South Wales Shop Assistants' 
Union is again agitating for a compul- 
sory Saturday half-holiday, in place of 
tie- present law, which <;ives Bhopki 
the option of closing either on Wo. 1ms 
day or Saturday afternoons. The Syd 
ney Labor Council has extended its 
hearty co-operation in the movement. 

The Mexican Central Railroad firemen 
went on strike at Monterey. Mex., on 
October 7, and as a result traffic along 
the line is now practically at a stand- 
still. The firemen, it is said, demand :i 
cents a kilometer, Alabama coal for fuel 
and helpers. The company, it is said, is 
willing to concede everything but Ala- 
bama coal, claiming that it is too ex 
pensive. 

The British Trade-Union Congress, at 
Hanley, by a vote representing 1,2 
members against 26,000, declared for 
free trade, asserting that 'any departure 
therefrom would be detrimental to the 
interests of the working classes, upon 
whom the burden of Protection would 
press the most heavily.'' The resolution 
also expressed the opinion that a system 
of preference or retaliation would prove 
a hindrance to international progress 
and peace. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters are advertised for six months 

ivept at the Sailors' Union Office for 

twelve months, all told. If not called 

the expiration ..f one year letters 

will be returned to the Postoffiee. 



Aamodt, i. f. 

A ass, T. A. 

imsen, a. 

Adolf. C. 

p, Richard 
Aglltzky, Hans 
s, 1". 

Amundsen. Pet. 
Amundsen-1014 
Amundsen. l>an 
Amundsson, M. 

rsen-714 
Andersen-1009 
Andersen. E. G. 
Andersen-1 286 
Andersen. A. II. 
Andersen, Sigurd 

Andersen, Eskil 

Andersen-1 1 1 '■', 
Andersen- 
Baardsen, 
Bag-got, R. II. 
Balke, Henry 
Harber, A. 

le, Rupert 

it. II. c. 
Bennett, N. M. 
Bechler, J. 
Renson, Ben 
Rergh, A.-1S78 
Bergholm, Edw. 
Berggren, W. 
Berggvest, Emil 
Bernard, Bandallo 
Bernert, Fred. 
Berthelsen, Alf 
Blckrem, Olaus 
Bengtson-1272 
Bjornvik, Karl 
Blackley, Albert 
( !arlson-758 
('arisen, Hans 

i !arlson-760 

( 'arlsson- 1 19 
Carrlck, .las. B. 
Caspary, Sigard 
Chandler, Paul 
ChevlB. Frank 
Christiansen ..1 8 
Christensen, H. P. 
Dahlgren. Oscar 

'sen, l>an 

Danielson, Ernst 
Degn, Paul 
I >e c.root, J. 
De Jong. W. 
Kck. Nicolas 
Eide-419 
Ekendahl, Carl 
Eklund, Kllis 
Eliassen, J A. 
Eliassen. Ed. 
Klingsen, P. 
Ellis, T. W. S. 
Fagerlund, G. E. 

sen, Emil 
Fernandez-527 
Foley, James 
Forslund, Victor 
Forssell, Frans 
Forstrom, B. K. 
Gabrielsen. Knud 
Gasman, G. a. 
Gibbs, G. \V. 
Gilholm, A. 
Gent-661 

Gibbs, Harry D. 
Gibson, C. R. 
Gjesdal, E. 
Glaubltz, F. 
Gottschalk, Max 
Haglund, E. M. 
Harstrom, Fred 
Hakansson, Fred 
Halvorsen, II. 
Halvorsen, .1. 
Haiiberg. Herman 
Hammarsten, O. 
Hansen-lC 
I lansen-l 267 
Hansen, Alt'. 
Hansen, Hans K. 
Hansen-1 229 
Ilansen, H. C. 
Hansen, Fred S. 
I [ansen-1 r, « ; 7 
i [ansen-Edwart 
Ingebretsen, J. A. 
lngebretsen. C. J. 
Jansen, Henry 
Jansson- 1 23 I 
Jensen-1 -".is 
.lensen, O. 
Jensen- 1 279 
Jensen. Jens B. 

Jepsen. Antonl 
Johanesen, M. 

Johanesen-1 Rs 
Johanesen, John 
Johanessen-1 mi 

sen 159] 
Johansen-726 
Johansen, I.udv. 
JohanSOn, Herman 
Kandel 
Isarelsen-270 
Karlstrom, J. R. 
Kask, John 
Kearon, Wm. 
[{era, A. 
Kerche. August 
Klemettila-. : iK7 
Klosson. Chas. 

Ko'.lie. 1 

Kolderup-4i;3 
Kolstad, J. A. 
Koop, John 
Kopmann, J. 
Korthe, W. 
Laltone, Wiktor 
I.ajord, E. Peder- 
sen 

m, Thomas 
Barsen, Christian 
Barsen, Herman 
Barsen-613 
Larsen-957 
Barsen. Martin 
Barsen-1 jnj 
i.nrsen-769 
I.arssen, M. 
Barsson, Idorth 
Baurenson. Hugh 
Bailsman, John 
Beander. P. 
Belthoff, Carl 
Beineweber, J. 
Bikait. Ch. 
Macbeth-1124 
Madsen, P. J. 



Andersen-1272 
Anderson, C. K. W. 
And. rson-689 
Anderson-604 
Anderson, Adolf 
Anderson, Thomas 
Anoerson, Ed. A. 
Anderson. Fred 
Anderson, A. B. 
Anderson .Andrew 
Anderson- Hi 7 
Andersson-101 l 
Andersson. Oskar 
Andersson-1060 
Andersson-1119 
Andersson-1'J" I 
Anflndsen-1237 

A seli us. Algot 
Ash ford, G. B. 
Austrand, Chas. 
Blank, Charley 
Block, C. 
Block. Herman 
Bohrman. Win. 
.1 urgen 
Boisen, Knud 
Boothby, J. 
Borjesson. E. 
Borland, Wm. 
Bostrom, Carl 
Brauwer, G. 
Brillowskl, M. 
Brock. Herman 
Brown, Clarence 
Bruce, J- 
Buck, Harry 
Bnrke, Chas. 
Curious, H. 
Buset, I. 



Christensen-878 

Christensen. ( I. M. 

Chrlstensen-986 

Christensen. A. 
Christensen. M. 
Clausen-793 
Conaughton. E. 
Connor, Win. 
Craig, Alex 
Curtis. R. H. 
Doyle, W. P. 
Dierks, Johannes 
Duncan. Herbert 
Durand, Yves 
Durholt, Hugo 

Engell, E. 
Enlund, O. W. 
Erlrkson, E. 
Kriksen, Chas. 
Eriksen-539 
Evensen, A. 
Evensen, E. 
Eriksson, F. 
Forsstrom-997 
Fosen, A. II 
Fosen, < iscar 
Foyne, Sam 
Fredricson, Chas. 
Fredriksson, A. 

Grahn, c. 
Gronberg. Erik 
i fronman-606 
i lundersen-5] ■"■ 
Gulliksen, Gus 
Gunsten, G. 
Gustafson, F. 
Gustafson-600 
Gustafson, Oskar 

Hansen-] 464 
Hansen. Baurits A. 
Hansen, Hans-1250 
Hanson, J. A. 
I lansson- 1 2 . 
Hanson, Maurice 
Hanson-Sly 
Hanson, Adolph 
Helander, Chas. 
Heloste, c. E, 
Hinner, Paul 
Holm, A 
Holm, J. 
Holmes, C. 
Holmes, Chris F. 

Isakson, G. E. 
Iversen, Frank 
Johansson-880 
Johannson, J. W. 

S. 
Johansson- 1 1 86 
Johnsen, Slgv. B. 
Johnson-1399 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Harry 
Johnson- 1 162 

Johnson, Nataniel 
Jonasson, Frans 
Jorgensen ,P. 
Jorgensen, J. w. 
risen, Wm. 
Jurgis, J. 
Kosa, P. 
Knaph, John O. 
Knieling, John 
Knudsen, H. 
Knudson. Chris 
Kraut 7.. B. N. 
Krim. AugUBl 
Kristlansen, Gus 
Krislensen. Hans 
Kristensen, B. 
Kristensen. M. 
Kristoffersen, J. 
Krlza, R. 
Kroger. B. H. 
Kronva.ll, o. 
Bindquist, C. A. 
Bindstrom, Olof 
Bjungberg, W. 
Bof, Oscar 
Borensen, J. 
Bowrle, R. A. 
Budwick. Bert 
Bukln, Th. 
Bund. Martin 
Rundberg. Fred 
Bundin-1054 
Bundgvist, Oscar 
Bindholm, E. 
Bindman, A. 
Idnd. Christian 
Bindb-rg, John 
Bindquist, Karl 
Bindberg, Fred 
Bindburg, J. 
Madsen-1035 
Maun. E. 



Mannstrom, W. 

Manlison. A. 
Martin, \ 1 ' 

.Malls.' 

Matusewitsch, J. 
Maule, G. 
McCarthy-1 
McCormlck, J. 

MeKenzie, A. 
.Nelson, Carl A. 
Nelson, 11. 
Nelson, W.-320 

Nlelsen-751 

Nielsen- 156 
Neilson-.'.'J." 
Nielsen-22r> 
Niemann, Chr. 

Nilsen. Josef 

Nilsen "i 
Olstad, Hans 
Olausen, R 

( Meson. .Marinas 

1 ilsen. Jorgen 
533 

en.- en, B. K. 
(ilsen. Anton 
1 ilsen, J lans 
(ilsen. S. Albert 

Passon, Bi 
Patulny, V. 

..i-l 2 7 
Pearson, C. A. 
Pedersen- 1083 
Pedersen. K. ,M. 

rsen-563 

rsen-793 
Pedersen, Peder E. 
Pedersen, Sigurd 
Pedersen, Ed. 
Pedersen, P. N. 
Ramsey. Harry 
Rask, John 
Rasmusen-525 
Ratin, Anton 
Reese. W. 
Reichman-505 
Rosan, ( 1. 
Reuter. Chas. 
Richards, .las. 

..son. Harry 

Richmond, B. 
Rlcker, John 
Bamberg:, John 
Samuelson, J. 
Samuelsen, W. B. 
Sander-1068 
Sandston. P "ii 
Sanstrand, (Jus. 
Schade, Wenzel 
Schilling. Carl 
Sehubert-R87 

Schuhmacher, W. 
Schwencke, C. 
Self. Arthur 
Senden, Victor 
Seppel, P. 
Siem. Cornelius 
Slmonsen, Fred 
Skrrio. Mr. 
Smedburg, David 
Smith, John 
Taberman, Erik 
Talbot, A. E. 
Tallant, Christy 
Tarpey, Martin 
Tarpey, Martin 
Taxt. Thomas 
r. Frans 
Thestrup, B. P. 
Thomas. .Tas. W. 
Thoresen, Pet 
Thorsell, C. 
Thuestad, M. J. 
Unruh, Paul 
Vangsoe, .1 P. J. 
v. Lubke. Joh, 
Van ( icker, m r, 
Vanstone, 
Vaasallo, P. 
Watson. J. F. 
Weber, Emil 
Wendt, Herman 
Wesik, G. 
Westergren, A. 
West in. John 
Warta, Arthur 
Wifstraud. C. F. 
Vnung. Air 
Zachrlsen, J. M. 



11. M. J. 
Melander, Carl 
Menthen, otto 
Michael, Walter 
Michelson. II. M. 

oy, P. 
.Morris 

Mollis. Wm. T. 
Morrison, IB 
Nilsen, Bernt 
Nilson-65 1 
Nilssen-737 
Nisson, James 
Norbin, Axel 
Nordberg, Oscar 
Nordlund. F. 
Nylund, CI 
Nylund, August 
N.inan. J. ('. 
1 ilson-.". 13 

Olsson, Waldemar 
1 llssoi 

olsson, Gus 
on, K. E. 
Opderbeck, E. 
1 isterberg, Carl 

... Andreas 

Pederson, Olans 

m, Carl-556 
en, G us E. 

Petersen, Harald 

Peterson-990 

Peterson, Martin 

1 'el row. F. 

Pettersen, Chas. E. 

Pettei 

Petterson, Axe) 

Pickelmann, B. 
Robinson. John E. 

RoblSCh, Then. 

Rockwell, '■ 
rg, K. 
Rosenqulst, Alf. 
Rosenstrom, F. 

ROSS, Joseph A. 
Rudlaff, R. 
Rudslt, F. 

Russell, W. 

Rustad, Svi 

Smith, C. H. 
Smith. F. 
Sollle, tngo. 

192 
Sorensen-1 71 

rh. 
Sorensen, C. 

Stahn. Otto 
Starkey, \V. 
Btedman, G. F. 
SI ephan-1 i">"i 

1816 
Storsten, Henrlk 
Steuer, John 
Stjerna, s. M. 
Strandqulst, B. 
Stromberg, W. 
Svenson, John P. 
Swartholm, C. 
inn, John 
Tlesing, Ed. A. 
TIerney, John 

John 
Tollefsen. John 
Torkel-503 
Tralow, Richari 
Trepil 

1'ioekel. Fritz 
Tuxen, Carl 
Tyrholm, Johan 

He 1 1 
\'oigt, Arthur 
Von Asperen, W. 
Vorschuh, A. 

Vueia. V. 
V, d. Slugs, w. 
Wind. J. 
Winter. John G. 
Williams. R. C. 
Wilson. C. 
Wolf. John J. 
Wolfe. John 
Wolte, Paul 

Zervas, John 



I 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Aagard, Chr. 
Abraham son, Is. 

Ammel. A. 
Amundsen, P. 

Anderson. J. -760 
Anderson, Chas. 
Anderson. A. -650 
Anderson, H.-1073 
Anderson. K. 
Anderson. Anton 
Anderson. Simon 
Austin, Martin 
Ayllffe, A. J. 
Raardsen, Edvard 
Bakke, M. 

r, Frank 
Bergquist, C. 
Berkelund, Rasmus 
Bertelsen, Alf. 
Bjerregaard, Christ. 
Bjorkgren, Otto 
Bodlan, T. 

, C. 
Blomberg, G. 
Brandt, W. 
Brown, Frank 
Burke, Tbos. 
Brunstrom, U. A. 
Calberg, Oscar 
Calo, Augustin San- 
tos, 
p, J. 
Candela, Emil 
Cook, Harry 
Cook, E. I '. 
Carlsen, Walter 
Carlson, Eric 



Hansen, O. R. 
Hansei 
Hansen- i::ia; 
Hardy, W. 
Heggum, I.. 
llelin. L. K. 
Hermansen, A. 
Ililke. Carl 
Hogberg, Wm. 
Hoiin, J. 
Hollappa, Oscar 
Horsley, Robin 
Iverssen. Ole J. 
Jacobs, Geo. 
Jacobsen, A. B. 
Jacobsen, Oscar • 
Jaeol.son. J. P. 
Jansen, J, Ed. 
Jensen, C. H.-569 

!l. .1. G. 
Johansen, Chris 
Johansen, W. 
Johanson-1489 
Johanson-1338 
Johansen, Axel 
Johansen, K. 
Johansen, Paul 
Johansson, Evert 
Johannesen, Jo- 
hannes 
Johndahl, Harry 
Johnsen, J. W. 
Johnsen. A. 
Johnsen, John 
Johnson-1516 
Johnson, August 
Johnson, c-i 189 

Johnson. 11 
Joransen, P. .1. 
Karlsson, Julius 
Kelly, P. 
Klemetilla, G. 
Kloperstrom, Wm. 
Knudsen. F. 
Knudsen. II. B. 
KristofTersen, Karl 
KristofTerson, Olaf 
I.afstrom, A. 
Bambert, Edward 
Barsen, Peter V. 
Barsen, Hans 
11. .1. o. 
Beahy, W. 
Belsen, w. 
Leonard. John 
1 pwis. George H. 
1 le, a. 11. 
l.i... A. 
Rind. Carl 
Bind. Oscar 
Bindholm, c,.-.".'.it 
Marthlnsen K. M. 
Matiasen, Nels 
McCarthy, John 
M.l lonald, N. 
McNiell, .1. 
Meyer. G. 
Millard, W. G. 
Miller, James 
Miller, Harry 
Moore, William 
Moore, J. C. 
Morgan. Oskar 
Morrison. D. 

Murphy, H. 

Neilson, II. M.-7." 1 
Nelson, Jacob 
Nelson. Nels 
Nickolsen, Axel 

Nickel. E. 

Nicmerpn, 
Nilsen. S.-73I 
Nilsen. ' lie 
Nilsen, John 
Nilsen. Axel 
Nissen, James 
Nordenholt, J 
Norholm. K. It. 
Nylander, J. A. 
Oftiger, Geo. 
Olafsen, M. 



O'Baughlin. M. 
(ilsen, M.-r,ll7 
(ilsen. R. 
I, B. 
Olsen. Andrew 
Olsen, Anton 
Olsen, John C. 
(ilsen, Harry 
( ilsen, Olaf H. 
Olson, Claus 
Olson, Oben 
Olson, Regnvald 
olsson. Oscar 
( 11111 J. 
Orling, Gus 
Oshlin, A 
i (sterling, E. 

1, A. 
1 iverland, T. 
Paar, E. 
Paaverson, ' < 

1. T. 
Passo, Andrew 
Patterson. 

Ra\ erson, < < 
Pedersen, Hans 
Perry, R. 

Peterson. Richard 
Petterson, Chas. 
Pledvache .F.mil 
Pobus, B. 
Punnhagen, Bouis 

. . T. 
Qulnn, Daniel 
Ramm, A. 
1: n.-r>97 
Rosen. E. H. 
Rosness, C. B. 
Hoy. P. N. 
Rude, A. M. 
Salomon. E 

Samuelson, A. M. 

Samuelson, E. 

Schabethal, P. 
Scarabocia, M. 
Sedar, W. 

Simpson. W. 
Smith. Andrew 
Smith. Paul 
Soderman, E. 
Rolls. Ingvald 
So] rod, J. 
Sorensen, Soren 
Staaf. B. 
Steckman. G. W. 
Steffenson. S. 
Stenberg. Y. 
Sterro, J. 
Storhelm. K. N. 
Stossle 

Svendsen, B. H. 
Svendsen, Olaf 
Svenson, A.-1193 
Svensen, J. 
Bwanaen, F. I 
Swansen, Chas. 
S wansen, I ver 
Thlngwall, E. 
Thorn, a 

Thornton. Thomas 
Timm. K. 
Tornatrom, C. A. 
Turnbull, R. R. 
Turner, Fred 
Tuttle C. n 
Van Ree. W. 

Vogt, c. 

Yerna F. 
Vvplnkel 1. 
Walsh. J. 
Weger, P. 
Well. Charles 
Kennerlund, A. 
West, James 

WestCOtt. W. 

Wick. ( He 
wight, r. 

Wind. J. 
WInhneskl. F. 
Yunker. Paul 



I 



PORTLAND. OR. 



Carlson, J. 
Carlson. A. G. 

1 lasey, J. 
Casson, H. 
Chevilore, Rollion 
Christensen, P. 

Christenson, C. 
Christiansen. Fred- 
erick. 
Courtney, Ed. 

S, c. 
Danielson, Gustaf 
Danielson. Axel 
Deislng. Ernst . 
Denk, Adolf 
Doran, Eugene 
Duis, J. 
Eckland, Otto 
Klneff. R. H. 
Engberg. Oscar 
Eriksen, Fred 
Erlksen, Eneval 
Eriksen, M. 
Fraaer, James 
Fredericksen, I [ana 
Freusel. Adolf 
Gets, i>. 
Ginstrom. F. 
Gjerlow, Ingaard 
•Gorver, John 
Gosling, W, 
Gronberg, Carl 
Culdberg. Randolf 
en, K. E. 
sr, F. 
Halvorsen, Halver 

Hansen, II, ( '. 



Ardelenu. Joan 
Andersen, N. 
Bregler, Fried rich 
Carnaghan. Wm. 
Clifford, Ellc 
Riederlchsen. 

Heinr.-786 
I'ngebretsen, Mar- 
ens 
Fristrom, Ivar 
Hermanson. Albert 
Holstenborg, Olaf 
I vers, John 
Janson, Oscar 
Jacobsson, John 
Johansen. Chris- 

1592 
Johansen. Vlv-1238 



Kr.ine, Karl 
Is" liner. H.-463 

Lie, Henry 

Mel.auglin 
Magnusson-1 I 17 
McGregor. John A. 
Moe. John 
Robinson, John 

Herbert 
Sjostrom. S. E. 
Selbert. Henry 
Swensson, I.. 
Soderman. Eils 
Rnger. Raul 
Valet, Erllng 
Vanstone, Jack 
Westln, John 



EUREKA, CAL. 



Andersen, Chas. 
Arversen, Arturt 
1 toj Bson, R. ( '. 
Did ricks, Dlllef. 
Flenrie, Georges 
Forstrom, Ii 
Gottberg, J.-iR'-' 
Hansen, Hans T. 
1 lornbi rg, I :. P. 



Barsen. Alfred 
1 11 Ben, a mini 
Olsen, Arthur G. 
Olsen. II. 
Potujansky, R. 
Rohde. Robert 
Spreeslis. F. 
Torluk. Christian 
Walburg, oJhn 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



Anderson, Gilbert 
Baldvin, Melmer 
Hasel, GUStaf 
Hubraber, W. 

Johnson, H. 
Jorgensen. Bas- 
in uss 



Max 
Barson. Werner 
Molden, Jakot 
Olber, Morsehlns 

1 ' Barrow, Frank E. 
Pad, S V.-478 
Sundberg, John 



Jorgensen. Rasmus Wiebroc. Charley 
William 



DEMAND THIS LABEL 



153UCO By AUThQflTv Oi 




Xl^Ja"^ 



WHEN PURCHASING OVERALLS, SHIRTS, OILSKINS, OR 
READY-MADE CLOTHING OF ANY DESCRIPTION! 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 




LOOK FOR 

Jewelers' Union Label 

On Back of Each 

BUTTON 

International Seamen': Union of America 

BUTTONS 

For Sailors, Firemen, Cooks and 
Fishermen 

FIFTY CENTS EACH 

ED. ANDERSEN 

7 Fast St. SAN FRANCISCO 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



HOFFMAN CIGAR STORE 



Union-made Cigars and Tobacco. 
No Asiatics Employed. 



W. C. BERGIN, Proprietor 

Corner Hotel and Nuuanua Streets, 

HONOLULU, H. T. 



ABERDEEN. WASH. 



Anderson, Fritz 
Abrahamson, A. 
Anderson-512 
Anderson, A. -1060 
Anderson, Ed. 
Anderson, Eskll 
Andersen, L.-1245 
Anderson, Axel 
Begovich, J. 
Berthelsen, A. 
Bernhardsen, C. 
Block, Hermann 
Blrkelund, R. 
Caiman, George 
Chlausen, J. 
Danielsen, D. 
Dishler, Peter 
Dlttmayer, Ch. 
Dyb«land, P. Th. 
Eckman, G. A. 
Elfstrom, J. 
Farstad, K. E. 
Ehlers, Henry 
Hanson, J. F. & F. 
Hanston, Rob. 
Hansen, Henrik 
Hansen, Th. 
Hansen, Wm. 
Jacobson, John 
Jensen. P. 
Jugman. M. 
Janhunen, W.. 



Kelly, Patrick 
Klinker, J. 
Kenna, P. J. 
Martin, John F. 
Mikkelsen, Alf. 
Murphy, P.-919 
Mietinnen, Adolf 
Moe, John 
Nilsen, M. P. 
Nilsen, N. A. 
Nielsen, N. F.-51. 
Olsen, Servin 
Olsen, Adolf 
Olsen, Emiel M. 
Peterson, John 
Pederson, Hans 
Paar, Ernst 
Palmer, James 
Pettersen-415 
Reynolds, Roy 
Salvesen, Sam 
Schwenke, Carl 
Sylvain, Cloa 
Swanson, Oscar 
Sorensen, M. 
Sillman, A. 
Svenson, John 
Swenson, James 
Thies, Harry 
Weissin, Charles 
Werner, Frederick 
Zambuera, M. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



Abrahamsen, Aslak 

Anderson, S. K. 
Brown, H. S. 
Christianson, An- 
ton 
Garside, James 
Glasoe, A. 
Grant, Bert 
Hansen, Carl 
Hubsher, W. 
Jurgensen, W. P. 
Jortsson, Axel 
Kunigk, A. 
Kivstein, J. -262 
Earsen, John 
Leupstadius, Chas. 



Lie .Jens E. 
Lindblom, Wolter 
Mathisen, Ole A. 
Malmberg, Robert 
Martinsson, H. E. 
Nissen, Jens 
Olsson, Otto 
Pedersen, Dick 
Ross, Ben 
Smith, James 
Stoessle Camilie 
Sorensen, Soren 
Strom, John 
Thomas, Hamon 
Thomsen, Thomas 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Allen, Frans 
Anderson-1119 
Currie, Jas. 
Edlund, J. A. 
Engebretsen, M. 
Gilhooly, H. 
Gottschalk, Max 
Hinner, G. 
Ingebretsen, Nlls- 

407 
Jensen, Jens 
Jensen, Johan 
Jensen, V. E. 
Johansson. John L. 
Karlson, Julius 



Letters in the Office of the Fishermen's 
Union of the Pacific Coast and Alaska, 
San Francisco. 



Larsen, J. H. 
Eundberg, H. 
Mikkelsen, Julius 
Olsen, Sam 
Olson, O. A. -104 
Pearson, J. L. 
Perry, Ben 
Piedwache, Emile 
Roman, Ted 
Schilling, C. 
Smith, J. A. 
Stone, M. 
Swenson, H. 
Thomsen, Thomas 



Fishermen*s Lis; 
Bjorstrom, Carl 
Ekstrand, Frank 
Custafson, A. A. 
Jensen, Carl-268 
Johnson, Henry 
Jacobsson* C. E. 
Mick, Caccicco 



Nelson, John 
Knudtsen, Hans O. 
Sterens, Vint. 
Peter, Chas. W. 
Smith, Harry 
Vogt, Wilhelm 
Wilson, Harry 



Letters in the Office of the Marine 
Cooks and Stewards' Association, San 
Francisco. 



Ahlqulst, F. W. 
Alverson, Edward 
Anderson, A. F. 
Aspengren, Theo- 

dor. 
Beardall, Robert 
Branford, chas. 
Campbell, Neil H. 
Cederholm, Victor 
Duke, Charles 
Gleason, Wm. 
Godley, G. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hanslng, W. 
Henryks, Bert 
Jensen, J. C. 
Jessamine, James 
Jorgenson, Chas. 
Kendall. E. C. 
Kennedy, Thomas 
Kloot, Johannes 
McConaghy, Dav. 
McDonald, T. 
McLaughlin, Hugh 



McStay, Edward 
Miller, A. T. 
Mills, A. 
Nelson, Frank 
Olsen, Charles 
Palmer, John W. 
Pestell, Stanley 
Pons. Simon S. 
Purday, Harry 
Rios, Manuel 
Roberts, Stanley 
Sannlno, Giuseppe 
Spldowsky, Theodor 
Turner, W. 
Veldon, Thos. 
Wickstrom, John 
Wilson, Joe 
Wilson, J. T. 
Wilson, Peter 
Wllehart, Dav. 
Wolf, John 
Wolters, Geo. 
Young, Charles 



( Continued on rige i4.) 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE.) 

General Outfitters for Men and Boys 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m. ; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE. TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. 
Store closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 



1332 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



WHEN IN FORT AT TACOMA 

WALTER EHRL1CBMAN, 717 Pacific Ave. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



HOQUIAM, WASH. 



When in Port at Gray's Harbor Call 
at the 

Horseshoe Store 

HOQUIAM, WASH. 

For your Clothing, Furnishing Goods, 

Hats, Shoes, Rubber Boots 

and Oilskins. 

Honest Goods at Honest Prices. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing & Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 
UNION LABEL GOODS 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in union-made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



Chas. Eisenbeis F. W. Eisenbeis 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

EISENBEIS & SON 

Dealers in 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Crack- 
ers. Ships' Stores a Specialty. 
316 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. (Inc ) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 
Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Port Townsend, Wash. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 
Dry Goods, Clothing', Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
316 Water St., next to Commercial Bank, 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer! In 

LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND 

VEGETABLES. 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. »» 



OLD TACOMA CICAR STORE 

J. A. DAVID, Prop. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Tobaccos 
and Smokers' Articles 

Union Made Goods a Specialty. 
2319 NORTH 30th ST. 

OLD TACOMA, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BROS. 



.£UKa..iAfe>.tttt 
.WALTHAmI 



JEWELERS AND 
CHRONOMETER 
MAKERS. . . . 



19 HERON 



Union Made 
Watches & Jewelry 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



UNION HARDWARE STORE 

WM. GRIGGS 
404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 



Fine Pocket Knives, Tin 
Ware and Granite Ware. 



BARKLEY CYR CO. 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 
n6 SOUTH "G" STREET 

ABERDEEN, - WASH. 



W. C. JUDS0IM 

EXPRESSMAN 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
Phone 693 ABERDEEN, WASH. 



When in Fort at Aberdeen and looking 
for Union Goods call on 

L. FOGEL 

Watch for the Red Front, 24 Heron St. 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 

Everything from a pair of Rubber Bootb 

to a Tailor-made Suit. 



FOR UNION-MADE 

Tobacco and Cigars 

GO TO 

F. RINGSTAD 

Stand on Enerance to Union Office. 
ABERDEEN, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The following seaemn are Inquired tor 

by the Consul of Sweden and Norway at 

San Francisco: 

Alfred Svenson, from Gothenburg. 
Ax. 'i Edw. Rutgerson, from Gothen 

burg. 

Oscar Dahlgren, from New fork. 
Helmer Hansen, from Norland. 
Ole Halvor Sorensen, from Chrlstl- 
anla, 

Hugo Svenson, from Wisby. 

Axel Vit'.iro. from Ti ondhjem. 



News from Abroad. 



Italy has adhered in principle to th< 
second Hague conference. 

The Viceroy of Szechuen has decided 
to open the STang-tse River port of Wan- 
hsien to foreign trade. 

Prince Sergius Troubetskoy, regarded 
as the foremosi liberal in Eusoia, dud 
suddenly at St. Petersburg on October 12. 

Sir Henry Irving, the English actor, 
died suddenly at Bradford, England, on 

October 13, aged Ii7 years. 

Many persons were killed and wounded 
La a street riot at Moscow, Kussia, on 
October 8, resulting from the strike diffi- 
culties. 

The September statement of the Hoard 
of Trade shows an increase of $13,293,- 
000 in British imports and $17,108,000 
in exports. 

The Matin, of Paris, has declared that 
Great Britain had offered to join France 
against Germany in the early days of the 
Moroccan controversy. 

Professor Baron Ferdinand von Richt- 
hoefen, the distinguished geographer, 
died at Berlin, Germany, on October 7, 
aged 68 years. 

The treaty of peace between Russia 
and Japan will become effective upon its 
approval, without waiting the formal ex- 
change of ratifications at Washington, 
1). C. 

Traffic on the Suez Canal, which had 
been delayed since the blowing up of the 
wreck of the British steamer Chatham, 
on September 28, was resumed on Octo- 
ber 8. 

Official returns of the casualties of 
the Japanese army throughout the war 
show 46,180 killed, 10,970 died of 
wounds, and 15,300 died of disease, a 
toal of 72,450 dead. 

The German Emperor was out two 
hours and a half on October 12 on the 
Hamburg-American turbine liner Kaiaer. 
His majesty put her through various 
evolutions, and at the conclusion of the 
trials said the vessel's performances were 
splendid. 

The Sinaloa Land Company, which was 
recently organized at Los Angeles, Cal., 
to survey the public lands of Sinaloa un- 
der a Government concession, will receive 
one-third of the land surveyed, and plans 
to bring over thousands of Japanese and 
Germans. 

A Chinese Imperial edict has been is- 
sued establishing a new board dealing 
with police matters, which have hitherto 
been left in the hands of local officials 
of the various provinces. They will 
henceforth be regulated from a central 
department. 

A report has been received at Moji 
that the British steamer Leho struck a 
floating mine ninety miles east of Shang- 
tung Lighthouse On September 30. Of 
the crew and passengers, fifteen are re- 
ported missing, among them two foreign 
engineers. 

It is reported at Tokio, Japan, that 
Russia will station 300,000 troops on the 
Chinese frontier after peace has been 
declared, partly because she is apprehen- 
sive of the soldiers joining the malcon- 
tents at home and partly for intiniida 
tion of the Chinese. 

At a recent Conference Of Flemish 

officers with the Czar, an important 
modification Of the Imperial manifesto 
of June 26 was adopted, permitting the 
employment of Finnish and Swedish in 

the lighter administrative departments 

in Finland, instead Of the exclusive use 
of the Russian language. 

It is understood in London that Great 

Britain lias agl I to maintain the i 

Of L855, which guarantees the integrity 

of Scandinavia, so far as Norway is con- 
,., i ,,,.,i, on condition thai a monarchy be 
established. The candidature of Prince 
Charles of Denmark to the Norwegian 

throne has been virtually accepted bj all 

parties. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



The Philadelphia, Pa., Central Labor 

Union has withdrawn its candidate for 
the Shrievalty and indorse. 1 the Bepubli 
can municipal ticket. 

A convention of mine workers of the 
three anthracite districts will be held 
in Shamokin, Pa., on December 14, when 
demands will be formulated to be pre- 
sented to the coal companies next .spring. 
Judge Ferris, of Wilkesbarre, Pa., has 
declared the Trades Council and its 
agents of that city in contempt of court 
for violating an injunction, and attach- 
ments have been issued for the princi- 
pal officers of the Council. 

The officials of the International Typo- 
graphical Union report that tin- eight- 
hour strike is practically won, and that 
the employers are now declaring for the 
"open shop" as a means of covering 
their defeat. 

One hundred and twenty-five miners 
employed at a mine near Terre Haute, 
fnd., struck reecntly because the mine 
mule didn't have enough to eat. The 
manager of the mine promised that the 
animal should have three square meals 
and the men returned to work. 

The American Federation of Labor has 
indorsed the appeal of the Shirt, Waist 
and Laundry Workers' Union for finan- 
cial assistance in aid of the starchns mi 
strike at Troy, X. Y. Contributions 
should lie sent to John J. Manning. I'. < >. 
Box 11, Station 1, Troy, N. Y. 

Shelby Smith has signed an apology 
to the officers of the International Typo- 
graphical I'nion and withdrawn his suit 
for an injunction to prohibit the Phila- 
delphia local from expelling him. In 
return the International Typographical 
Union has withdrawn its charges, and 
the incident is closed. 

Justice Smith, of the Illinois Appellate 
Court, in an opinion handed ''.own at 
Chicago on October 6 against Franklin 
Union, No. 4, fined three members of 
that organization $100 each and sen- 
tenced them to thirty days' imprison- 
ment for violation of an injunction Be 
cured by the Chicago Typothetae. 

Francis F. Black, President of the 
Master House Painters and Decorators' 
Association, Philadelphia, Pa., was re- 
cently summoned as a defendant to a 
suit for $5000 damages, entered by Bry- 
ant B. Wilson, for false arrest and im- 
prisonment. Wilson claims to have been 
arrested on a false charge of picketing. 

The Fall River (Mass.) Textile Coun- 
cil has voted to request the Manufac- 
turers' Association to restore the reduc- 
tion, of 12% per eent in wages which 
was made on July 15, 1904. The condi- 
tion of the cloth market is said to lie 
better than it has been for years. The 
mills have orders to keep them busy well 
up in the new year. 

Ten employes of the Postolli 
Goldfield, New, went on a strike en Oc- 
tober 5 against an order from Washing- 
ton reducing salaries from $120 a 
month, which is a bare living at Cold- 
field, to $83 a month, which, with 
at $30 a month for single adobe rooms, 
and board at. $45 a month and baths at 
$1 a piece, would make living under 
such salaries impossible. 

In its last quarterly bulletin, publish- 
ed on October 2, the New York state 
Department of Labor calls attention to a 
marked improvement in trade, which be- 
gan in the middle of 1904, and has con- 
tinued uninterruptedly. The Depart- 
ment says that there an' relatively fewer 
idle wage earners in New York than 
there were even in 1902, the most pros- 
perous year of the decade. The a 
monthly number of unemployed mem- 
bers was only 151 per 1000 in the first 
half of 1905, as compared with 202 last 
year and 1GS in 1902. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



SAWTELLE CLOTHING STORE 

H. A. SCHWARTZ, Prop. 



Headquarters for Seamen's Wearing Apparel. 
A complete line of Union Made goods in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats, Furnishing Goods, 
Oil Clothing, Rubber Boots, etc., etc. 



AGENTS FOR W. L. DOUGLAS SHOES 

$3.00 to $5.00, Union Made. 



Just around corner 
from Union Office. 



307 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



HERMAN SCHULZE 
CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F 

EUREKA. CAL. 



White Labor Only 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

3. A. ANDERSON, Proprietor. 



BOAKD AND LODGING 

$5.00 PER WEEK. 
Neatest and Cleanest Place in Town. 



CORNER FIRST AND D STREETS. 



The Finest Beer Brewed on the Coast 
by the 

Humboldt Brewing Co. 

2996-3048 Broadway. 

Delivered and shipped to any part of 
the City and County on short notice. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY 8c YOUNG. 



Manufacturer of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottler and dealer in En- 
terprise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



SMOKED 

The "Popular Favorites," the "Little 
Eeauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 



532 Second St., 



EUREKA, CAL. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENOORD, Proprietor. 



First-class Board and Lodging 

Reasonable Rates. 



Front Street, between C and D, 
EUREKA, CAL. 



The hhi Lodging En 

F. BORGES, Proprietor. 

NEATEST AND CLEANEST PLACE 
IN EUREKA. 

313 FIRST STREET. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 

OSCAR SW ANSON, Proprietor. 
An old-time Union Man. 



Board and lodging,2 $5 per week. 
Single meals, 25c. Beds, L'5c. and 50c. 



322 First Street, between D and E, 
EUREKA, CAD. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



HQRlTY OP 




From 
..Maker to Wearer.. 



The only Clothing Establishment on the Pacific Coast selling goods at less 
than Eastern Prices. 

JACOBSEN. CLOTHIER 

Manufacturer and Retailer 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS AND FURNISHINGS. 

812 and 814 FIRST AVENUE. SEATTLE WASH. 




CLOTHING HOUSE 

Wholesale and Retail 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 
Boots, Shoes 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 

ALL UNION MADE GOODS 

Only Union Clerks Employed. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

navigation and nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH Principal 

Miss Helen C. Smith Assistant 

Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Naviga- 
tion. Successful Compass Adjuster. 
Ocean license unlimited. Steam and 
sail, American and British. 
472 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300 




SHOE & CLOTHING COMPANY 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 



615=617 first Ave. 

SEATTLE, WASH 



OPPOSITE 
TOTEM POLE 



THE "OUR HOUSE" CIGAR STORE 

E. J. HABERER, Proprietor, 

151 WASHINGTON ST., SEATTDE. 



Carries a full line of Cigars, Tobaccos 
and Smokers' Articles. 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY. 
Telephone Ind. 118. 



When Purchasing from our Advertisers Always Mention the 
COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



EUREKA. CAL. 



J. Perrv p Hess 

UNION TRANSFER 

Baggage and Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES 
Office, 119 D Street 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDG. 
Thone Main 70. EUREKA, CAL. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

*OB 

SQUARE MEAL 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D St., Eurekn, Cal. 

WM. GOETZ, Prop. 

PORTLAND, OR. 

EXPRESS IMP. 101 

Stand near Sailors' Union Office. 

Also Furnished Booms. Call at Cigar 

Store, 201 Bnrnside St. 

F. P. JOHNSON, 

Phone Scott 5 !» _ 2 . Portland, Or. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



B0NNEY & STEWART 

UNDERTAKERS 

Third & Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a 
specialty. All orders by telephone 
or telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

C. J. BERENDES 

SOUTH SIDE HOTEL 

806 THIRD STBEET, 
Between Berry and Xing Streets. 

The rooms are all newly furnished 
and the accommodations first class. 
Board and Lodging, $5 per week. AH 

rooms single. 



ODD FELLOWS CEMETERY 

AT COLMA 

Near San Francisco 

Is now ready for interim 1 ts 

Telephones West 8J6 and 
Church 5563 



Union Made by Union Maids 



A 



O 
JO 



2* 

m 






3 5 cd 



7. I S 2 § a jj 



© ? 

n 
x 

» 



£ 3 



V 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



George Jordan, a native of Germany, 
last heard from in August, 1902, Bl 
Port Townsend, Wash., is inquired for 
by the German Consulate at San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

James Thorburn, age about 22, wm 
recently staying at the Scandinavian 
Sailors' Home, San Francisco, is inquired 
for. Address, Coast Seamen's JOURNAL. 

James L. Russell, a native of Genera, 
N. Y.J last heard of about eighteen 
months ago, when going to Alaska, is 
inquired for. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

240 Montgomery St., Cor. Fine. 

Booms 14-15-16. Phone Main 5719. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 



CITY FRONT DRUG STORE 

W. L. BOURNS, Proprietor. 

10 Mission Street 

Phone Bush 810. San Francisco. 

Careful attention given to Supply- 
ing Ships with Drugs. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

536 California Street, San Francisco. 



Guaranteed Capital and 

Surplus $ 2,500,098.42 

Capital actually paid up 

in cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, June 30, 1905... 37,738,672.17 



Board of Directors. 
John Lloyd, President; Daniel Mey- 
er, 1st Vice-President; Emil Rohte, 2d 
Vice-President; Ign. Steinhart, T. N. 
Walter, N. Ohlandt, J. W. Van Bergen, 
F. Tillmann Jr., and E. T. Kruse. 



A. H. R. Schmidt, Cashier; Wm. 
Hermann, Asst. Cashier; Geo. Tourny, 
Secretary; A. H. Muller, Asst. Secre- 
tary; W. S. Goodfellow. General Atty. 



California Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company 

Receives Savings Deposits of 
Ten Dollars and Upwards. 



IT PAYS INTEREST 

TWICE A YEAR. 
Eate — 

3% per cent on ordinary accounts 
3 6/10 per cent on term accounts 



CAPITAL a. SURPLUS, 
TOTAL ASSETS. - 



$1,521.71198 
7,888,697.13 



Deposits may be made by P. O. 
Order, Wells-Fargo Money Order 
or Bank Draft 

Send for Pamphlets Descriptive 
of our Business 



OFFICES 

Cor. California and Montgomery Sis 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




WORSHIPING THE GOLDEN CALF 

is very far from thinking enough of the 
comforts to be had from money to save 
it when youth, health and strength are 
ours. Lay by your pennies until they're 
a few dollars, deposit the latter with us 
and reap the constantly increasing ad- 
vantage of the 3% per cent interest we 
allow, ocmpounded every six months. 
Don't serve gold — make gold serve you. 

We also pay 4 per cent interest on 
term deposits, compounded every six 
months. 

Opn Saturday evenings from 5 to 8. 

Safe Deposit Boxes for rent from 
$2.50 per year upwards. 

THE MARKET STBEET BANK, 

Seventh and Market Sts., 

San Francisco. 



California Undertaking Co. 

PRIVATE - RESIDENCE - PARLORS 

B> J. Ocvlin, Manager 
Wm m. lindbey, Sccrctarv 

713 POST ST , SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

EMBALMING A SPECIALTY 
OPEN DAY AND NIOHT TCLtPHONC CAST 12*3 



Frank J. Symmes, President Henry Brunner, Cashier 

Chas. Nelson, Vice-President F. F. Ouer, Asst. Cashier 

O. A. Hale, Vice-President Otto Ottesen, Asst. Cashier 

E. W. Runyon, Vice-President 

CENTRAL TRUST CO. OF CALIFORNIA 

42 Montgomery Street, Corner of Sutter Street, SAN FRANCISCO 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS FAID IN. - - $1,765,000.00 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

3%% per Annum on Ordinary Deposits 3 6/10% per Annua on Term Deposits 

We sell Drafts and Money Orders on all cities 
In Norway, Sweden and Denmark at Cheapest Bates 
Our Bank in Norway is: Our Bank in Denmark Is: 

Central Banken for Norge In Den Danske Landmands Bank In 

Christiania. Copenhagen. 

Our Bank in Sweden is: Skanes Enskilda Bank in Malmo. 
We write and speak the Scandinavian languages. 
DIBECTOBS: 
F. W. Dohrmann James Madison 
Frank J. Symmes 
Henry Brunner 
C. C. Moore 
W. A. Frederick 



Chas. Webb Howard 
Geo. C. Perkins 
Mark L. Gerstle 
E. A. Denicke 
O. A. Hale 



G.-ivln McNab 
Charles F. Leege 
J. M. Vance 
Charles Nelson 



John M. Keith 
E. W. Runyon 
G. H. TJmbsen 
R. D. Hume 



FRANK 
BROS. 



Union-made Clothes 
Tailor-made Clothes 
Underwear ^ Shoes 
Hats * V? * * 



Cor.KEARNYS SACRAMENTO STS. 

San Francisco. 



Political Printing 



ALL KINDS 



The James H. Barry Co. 

("The Star" Office) 

429 MONTGOMERY ST. 

Phone Main 358 

GOOD WORK FAIR PRICES 



M. A. MAHER 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS 

Boots, Tobacco, Cutlery, etc. 

United Workingmen's Shoes. 

Also Agency for the Orthopedic Shoe. 

206 East St., near Howard. 
Phone Red 4 272. San Francisco. 



JOE HARRIS 

SEA-FARING MEN'S OUTFITTER 

Beady-Made Uniforms. 

Cap Making a Specialty. 

5 JACKSON ST., NEAB EAST, 

■Pel. John 3561. San Francisco. 



EXPRESSING 

Done by 

CHRIS. JORTALL 

Stand at Union Office, 
Southwest Corner East and Mission Sts. 



GREEN'S UNION STORE 

14 CLAY ST., one Block North of 
Market St., near Ferry. 

SAILORS' OUTFITS 

Best qi ality Rubber Boots and Oil 
Clothing, Shoes, Flannel Underwear, 
Hats, etc. 

ALL WITH THE UNION LABEL. 
We give you a square deal. 



D. EDWARDS 

4 MISSION ST., SAN FBANCISCO 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

We sell the kind of Goods yoa require. 
Extra Strong Hickory Shirts \ 
Best Overalls ]UNI0N 

Good Lumber Shoes JLABEL 

Stockton Flannel Underwear/ 
Uso a full line of Gentlemen's Furnish- 
ing Goods and Hats. Look at our 
goods. You will be pleased. No trou- 
ble to show them. 



SMOKE 



RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNIONJVIADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO. 

324 BATTERY ST., S. F. 



Straight Talk 
Right from the 
Shoulder and 
Straight to Sailors 

Let nothing stand between 
your cabin door and the en- 
trance to this store. 

No transaction is consid- 
ered complete until you are 
satisfied. It is a case of your 
money's worth to yon r satis- 
faction or your money back. 

AN OFFER ON SHOES. 

We want you to see a working 
shoe which we have — the lot num- 
ber is 619. The price is $2.50 the 
pair, and they are water proof. 
Union-made — and guaranteed in 
every way. Just try asking for 
this shoe, we know you will like it. 



The Red Front 
Clothing Co. 

MARKET ST., P D *? ell 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



STILL ON DECK 

ED. ANDERSEN 

7 EAST ST., NEAB MARKET 

Cigars, Tobacco and Notions 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY. 
LUMBER HOOKS. 



Union Boot and 
Shoe Store... 

Repairing Neatly Done 

C. LESTER 
12 Steaart Street. 




Domestic and Naval. 



Sobriety is a notable feature in the 
conduct of the men in the North Atlantic 
squadron, now visiting New York. 

Admiral Dewey declares that the offi- 
cers of the American Navy above the 
rank of lieutenant, as a rule, are too old 
for the grades they occupy. 

The American Association of Bankers, 
at New York on October 12, indorsed the 
ship subsidy bill presented to the last 
Congress and urged its passage. 

Lord Inverclyde, chairman of the 
Cunard Steamship Company, died at 
Castle Wemyss, Scotland, on October 8, 
aged 44 years. 

Five steerage passengers on the Cunard 
liner Campania were drowned and a num- 
ber injured by the shipping of a heavy 
sea during the Inst, westward passage of 
that vessel. 

The construction department of the 
Navy will strongly recommend that one 
of the two battleships authorized by Con- 
gress be built at the Brooklyn Navy 
Yard. 

Secretary of the Navy Bonaparte has 
under consideration a recommendation 
made to him that he request Congress 
to increase the tonnage of the two bat- 
tleships authorized at the last session 
from 16,000 to 18,000 tons. 

Members of the Wilmington (Del.) 
Board of Trade recently met Representa- 
tive Hiram R. Burton and discussed 
plans for legislation at the coming ses- 
sion of Congress to further the Delaware 
Ship Canal project. 

A very dangerous derelict was recently 
reported in latitude 40.14 north, longi- 
tude 62.25 west by the Italian steamer 
Citta di Napoli, which arrived at New 
York on October 6, from Genoa. The 
derelict, about 80 feet long, was passed 
on October 4. 

The schooner Dora, which sailed from 
Charleston, S. C, with lumber bound for 
New York, encountered rough weather 
off Frying Pan Shoals, and, putting back 
for harbor, went aground in the darkness 
on Morse Shoals. She was afterward 
floated in a leaky condition. 

The Spanish steamer Gaditano was 
sold at Norfolk, Va., on" October 9, by 
William Matson, of San Francisco, for 
the sum of $45,650. The steamer was 
recently floated by the Merritt & Chap- 
man Wrecking Company, which libeled 
her for $51,000, and the sale followed. 

Representatives of practically all the 
shipbuilding firms of the country having 
dealings with the Navy Department were 
in conference with Secretary Bonaparte 
recently regarding the forms of con- 
tracts for the construction of naval ves- 
sels. These form3 are now unsatisfac- 
tory. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports that 
ninety-two sail and steam vessels, of 
25,789 gross tons were built in the 
United States during September, 1905. 
The largest steam vessel included in these 
figures was the Henry C. Frick, of 6,590 
gross tons, built at West Bay City, Mich., 
for the Pittsburg Steamship Company. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports that 
315 .sail and steam vessels, of 82,520 
gross tons, were built in the United 
States during the quarter ended Septem- 
ber 30, 1905. During tho corresponding 
quarter ended September 30, 1904, 328 
sail and steam vessels, of 40,374 gross 
tons, were built in the United States. 

The Canadian Department of Marine 
and Fisheries has referred to the Impe- 
rial Government the question of supply- 
ing the Canadian cruiser Vigilant with 
quick-fire three-pound guns. The of- 
ficials believe thai under the Bush-Bagot 
treaty of 1817 they can ship guns of 
that size. If the answer from London 
is favorable four quick-firing three- 
pounders will be at once placed on board 
the Vigilant on Lake Erie, and decisive 
steps will be taken to stop the wholesale 
poaching by American fishermen. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



Forewarned.— Bob— "Miss Subbubs 
has asked me to call to-night." 
Dick- • 5 

Bob— "Yea. What shall l wear?" 

Dick (who has hen there) — " 'Wan 
the ihig! " 



The "Fly" Ply. — "Good morning!" 
said the spider, adding the familiar polite 

invitation to step into the parlor. 

"Step into your parlort" repeated the 
fly, with a knowing wink. " You mean 
your dining room, don't you? No, thank 
von. ' ' 



Very True. — Wigga — " He 'a had a 

great many ups and downs in his life." 

Wagge — "He certainly has had a 
checkered career, bu( lie's very wealthy 

now. ' ' 

Wigga— " Tee, you might say that his 
career is ex-chequered now, eh.'" 



A Beginning. — "Oh, no, of eourse 1 
don't care tor bicycling now. I'm go- 
ing in lor golf." 

"Indeed? Have you got an outlit .' " 
"Part of it. I've got the golf stock- 
ings I used to wear when I rode the 
wheel." 



Letting Him Down. — "I suppose,' 
said the timid suitor, "when you recall 
what a handsome man your first husband 
was you wouldn't consider me for a lain 

ate." 

"Oh, yes, I would," replied tie 
pretty widow, "but I wouldn't consider 
you for a second. 



Commuted. — * 'But," said the mer- 
chant to the applicant, "you don't fur- 
nish any references from your last 
place. " 

"Yon needn't worry about that," re 
plied the man with the dose-cropped 
load and prison pallor, "1 wouldn't be 
here now if it hadu 't been for my good 

behavior in my last place. 



The Boston Way.- "You were em- 
ployed by .Mrs. Swellman, you say," said 
the housekeeper. "Thai was your last 
place, wasn 't it .' " 

"I assuredly hope not." replied the 
Boston servant-maid; "I expect to get 
another. If, however, you really meant 
to inquire if my 'latest' place was with 
Mrs. Swellman, my reply is in the affir- 
mative. " 



LUNDSTROM'S 



$2.50 Hats 



UNION 
MADE . 

Made by 

PACIFIC COAST 

HAT WORKS 

1458 Market St., opposite Central 
Theater, and 605 Kearny Street. 



Country Orders Solicited. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 



Bagley's 
Lime Kiln 
Club 



" -~Hw< ffAuihoff S el the— ^ 

TUKUWUHH ' 




Established 
Over 

30 Years 
on the 
Pacific 
Coast 



Every Package bears 
the Union Label 




\Monmade 
Clothing 




We are one of the pioneers to adopt the union 
label of the Garment Workers. We manufacture all our clothing in 
our own workshops, and all of It Is made by union men. Ours are 
the only thoroughly union clothing stores in San Francisco. 

Other stores have only a few union-made lines to show union men 
when they call. But everything Is union-made In our store. 

In purchasing here you buy direct from the makers at a saving 
of middlemen's profits. 

Ready-to-wear suits and overcoats $10.00 to $35.00. 

Made-to order suits and overcoats $10.00 to $45.00. 

Garments can be purchased In either one of our two stores. 



TWO LARGE 
STORES 



S. N. WOOD & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Cor. POWELL 4 ELLIS 
AND 740 MARKET 



James A* Sorensen Co. 

WATCHMAKERS, JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 




103 to 111 SIXTH STREET, 
Telephone Jessie 2821 



Below Mission. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Eyes 



^ames J{. iSorcmen, 



All Watch Repairing Warranted for two years. 
Tested Free by an Kxport Optician. 

ALARM CLOCKS REDUCED TO 45 CENTS. 

Open Evenings till 8 p. m. Saturdays, 10 p. m. 

THE BIG JEWELRY STORE 



SMOKERS 



See that this labei (in light blue) 
appears on the box from which 
you are served. 



Issued by Authority oi the Cigar Makers' International union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

Shis (Etilrtirl Twt*ecifl»rico<ii*n«i< inti,,ibOTM»«ii«fi> n»«byJiisl-Class Workman 

aHE«6£R0r THCQCMIUMItS'lNllRlUTlOIUlUNIOIIol Amend, in oruruMiee devoteO to the I 
»dn«m»nt o( llit M0«Al MAUBlAlifK] iMUUClUAl Will AW Of TUf CRAfT. Tlieretoie »t leaenn 
these Ooeri to in vnoAen throuohoui int walo 
All wliingemou upon this Libel mlt be puMined iccordina. to lew 

if }K {/hjCt^uS, Pnsdtnt. 

PATRONIZE UNION INDUSTRY 

SHOKE UNION-MADE CIGARS THAT BEAR 
THE ABOVE LABEL 



(Otherwise known as SAM.) 

808 THIRD STREET 

Between Xing' and Berry Sts., San Francisco. 

GENTS', YOUTHS' AND BOYS' CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, etc.. Boots. 
Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing of all kinds. Everything strictly 
UNION MADE. Seamen's outfits a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the lowest market price give me a call. 
DO not make a mistake— LOOK FOR THI0 NAME AND NUMBER. 



Taylor's Nautical School 




506 



BATTERY STREET 

COR. WASHINGTON ST. 



uTcultom House SAN FRANCISCO 



Oldest School on Pacific Coast, Largest 
and best equipped private Nautical School 
in the United States. Graduates prepared 
for the American and British Merchant 
Marine Examinations. Warrant officers of 
the United States Navy prepared for ex- 
amination for commissioned officers. Spec- 
ial course for cadets entering the United 
States Naval Academy and American Mer- 
chant Marine. 

Taylor's Modern Navigation, a book for 
both young and old navigators, is now in 
the Library of every Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship, in many Universities, and Is highly 
recommended by many noted navigators. 
Send for circulars and testimonials. 



Moving 
Time Now 



All the Cock rooms that were for- 
merly dOTvn-stalrs are moved to 
the sixth Door. 

The Stationery Department is moved 
to the rear of the middle east aisle, 
main floor. 

Notions are in their new department, 
rear, east aisle, main Hi 

Art Goods have moved across the 
aisle from their old position, 

All Into Larger 
Quarters 

And betterments are still coins' on to 
make the store nearly twice a3 
large, nearly twice as good for you. 

Meantime all departments are Incon- 
venienced and crowded. To lighten 
stocks and relieve strain, unusual 
opportunities are in evidence 
everywhere, in addition to other 
events specially planned to be ex- 
traordinarily important. 



Open at 9. 



Closed at 6 every day. 



MARKET ST., NEAR SIXTH 
San Francisco 



Union 
Clothing Store 

A ft i.Ml'I.KTK STUCK UF 

Sailors' and Firemen's Clothing' 
and General Supplies. 



ERNEST COLBY 

17 > 2 Steuart Street, 
Bel Market & Mission, San Franclsc 




eUrOnS 

Thelarpest first class 
tailorin^establishment , 
on the Pacific Coast I 



this 



■uslrig 



label 



Suits to' order 
from $f(> 00 up 

Trousers to order 
from$gOO up 

'Samples and Self Measurement Blanks 
free by mail 

•■CHARLES I^YONS 
ViJ LondonTailor f 

721 Market g 122 Kearny- s? 



SCOTTY'S MILWAUKEE 
SWEATERS & JACKETS 

Have stood the test against all 
compel Itors, 

Lake Faring Men All Know It. 

SWEATERS SENT BY 
MAIL FOB $3.00 
Beware of Imitations. 

WILLIAM LISLE 

"SCOTTT" 

111 Menomenee St., Milwaukee, Wis. 




A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



Vol. XIX. No. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1905. 



Whole No. 941. 



RIGHTS OF PUBLIC EMPLOYES. 



Public Ownership and Private Rights. 

The StriKe as an "Act of Treason." 

commit them to the principle of a "strike against the 
Government." In other words, a strike, which, when 
undertaken by the employes of a private concern, 
would raise no question of wrong to the employer or 
of disloyalty to the State, would, when undertaken by 
the Letter-Carriers, be an act of treason to the Gov- 
ernment! It is apparent, from this view of the ease, 
that the Letter-Carriers regard the Government as a 
thing separate from and superior to themselves and 
the public at large. Herein lies the assumed difference 
between the United States Government, as an em- 
ployer, and the private individual or corporation, con- 
sidered in the same capacity. In this view the citizen 
who accepts employment under the Government fore- 
goes the rights of citizenship and becomes a mere 
cipher, entirely subject to the will of his superiors! 
A moment's reflection will show that the Letter-Car- 
riers ' idea of inconsistency in the matter of affiliation 
with the American Federation of Labor is in reality 
inconsistency in their idea of the Government and of 
the mutual relations existing between it and its em- 
ployes. 

In the true conception of the United States Govern- 
ment, as a representative institution restricted by the 
terms of an express grant of power on the part of the 
people, there can be no question as to the position 
properly occupied by its employes. The Government 
being merely the creature of the- people, designed to 
effect the will of the people in certain specified mat- 
ters, it is inconsistent to suppose that the people, or 
any part of them, surrender of necessity any of the 
functions or rights reserved by them by the mere act 
of accepting service under the Government. On the 
contrary, the citizen who enters the service of the 
Government carries with him and retains throughout 
that service all the rights of citizenship, and remains 
as free in the exercise of these rights, regardless of 
public inconvenience, as do his fellow-citizens in pri- 
vate employment. 

The attitude of the Letter-Carriers is cited, not for 
anything peculiar to the particular circumstances, but 
because it illustrates in a typical way the marked 
tendency in numerous quarters toward an important 
change in the viewpoints of people and Government, 
toward each other. The notion that service in the 
civil branches of the Government involves a surrender 
of the rights of citizenship, and particularly of the 
right to quit work (as in the case of a strike of let- 
ter-carriers, for instance) lias taken firm root in many 
minds and threatens to become general, if not uni- 
versal. That idea lias been enunciated in high places 
with all the confidence of set convict ion, as though it 
were a matter of course. Not only has tins, ;is yet, 
snmeuh:it novel docl ri nc been applied t<> employes of 
the Government, but it lias been extended to employes 
holding licenses from the Government and, to go still 
further, to employes of the so-called public-service 
corporations. For instance, it has been officially de 
dared that the ship's officer — master, mate or engineer 
— who of necessity holds a license from the Federal 
Government, is as much a part of the Government ;is 
is the soldier in the Army or the seaman in tin- Navy, 
and, therefore, thai he may be subjected t" compulsory 
service precisely as are Hie members of He- military 
icel Again, we commonly hem- it said that em 
ployes in the transportation service seamen, rail- 
roadmen, street-carmen, etc.- are public servants, and 
therefore Have no right to "strike againsl the pub- 
lic"! 



THE National Association of Letter-Carriers, at 
its convention in Portland, Or., last month, de- 
cided not to affiliate with the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, upon the ground that affiliation with 
the labor movement would be ' ' inconsistent with the 
Letter-Carriers' relations to their employer, the United 
States Government. ' ' This action, or rather the rea- 
soning upon which that action is based, raises an im- 
portant question, a question that becomes more im- 
portant every day. 

In what respect do the relations between the Let- 
ter-Carriers and their employer, the United States 
Government, suggest any inconsistency in the propo- 
sition of affiliation between the Letter-Carriers and 
other workers engaged in the service of other employ- 
ers? The essence of this question may be resolved 
into simpler terms, as follows: What difference exists 
between the United States Government, as the em- 
ployer of letter-carriers, and any other institution, 
considered aa the employer of any other class of labor? 
Stated more briefly still: What, if any, is the differ- 
ence between the United States Government and any 
other institution in the matter of the relations be- 
tween employer and employe? 

The answer to this question may be best reached by 
noting the position assumed by the Letter-Carriers 
themselves. We need not concern ourselves with the 
fears so often expressed by certain organizations or 
classes of labor, that affiliation with +he general labor 
movement involves an obligation to strike in sympathy 
with other organizations whenever ordered to do so 
by some central authority, such, for instance, as the 
American Federation of Labor. These fears are 
groundless, and rest upon a radical misapprehension 
of the construction and principles of the labor move- 
ment. As is well known by all persons familiar with 
the labor movement, the only authority to order a 
strike resides primarily in the men or women imme- 
diately concerned; at any rate, such authority extends 
no further in any case than the executive of the given 
craft. It is well known, too, that the sympathetic 
strike is discountenanced, and in fact prohibited, ex- 
cept in extreme cases in which the principle of common 
defense is at stake. In its concrete form the objection 
of the Letter-Carriers to affiliation with the labor 
movement lies not in the danger that they would 
thereby obligate themselves to strike on behalf of 
other crafts, but in the implication that they would 
thereby commit themselves to the possibility of a 
strike on their own behalf. 

The Letter-Carriers assume, first of all, that the 
labor movement is based upon the strike as the final 
resort in disputes between employers and employes, 
an assumption in itself substantially correct. From 
this assumption the Letter-Carriers draw the conclu- 
sion that affiliation with the labor movement would 



The growth of this idea compels a review of the 
whole question as to the relation that properly exists 
between the Government, or any so-called quasi-public 
body, and its employes. The necessity of a final deter- 
mination of the question becomes the greater in pro- 
portion to the growth of the sentiment in favor of 
public ownership of public utilities, and of that other 
well-defined sentiment in favor of increasing the num- 
ber of licensed vocations. Upon the outcome will de- 
pend very largely, indeed mainly, the ultimate judg- 
ment upon the latter questions. 

All questions of governmental policy must finally be 
determined in the light of their effect upon the peo- 
ple's freedom, specifically upon personal liberty. Gen- 
erally speaking, those policies which conserve and en- 
large personal liberty may be pronounced good, and 
vice versa. Without attempting to prejudge the ease 
of public ownership versus private ownership of so- 
called public utilities, it may be laid down as a funda- 
mental rule in the settlement of that case that the 
verdict must rest with that system which best protects 
and promotes the personal liberty of the employes. 
In turn, the question of personal liberty must be con- 
sidered in its broadest and most far-reaching aspect, 
namely, as a question of the individual right to quit 
work, either singly or by concert of numbers, and under 
any circumstances short of danger to life or property. 
Ali other questions of advantage or disadvantage in 
either system must finally be measured by this funda- 
mental standard. The right to quit work is as essen- 
tial to the welfare of the public, as to that of the pri- 
vate employe, since, in the absence of such right, the 
Government would inevitably become indifferent to 
the interests of its employes. 1'nblic ownership may 
promise beneficial results in public profit ami political 
morality, and to that extent may be pronounced a 
good thing. But if public ownership also promises 
the loss of personal liberty on the part of the public 
employe, it must be pronounced n bad thing. No inci- 
dental advantages to the public itself can possibly 
compensate the public employe for the sacrifice of his 
own rights as a member of the public. 

If there be any merit in the theory that the United 
States Government, considered ;is an employer of 
labor, must of necessity exercise powers which are de- 
nied to private employers, it follows that restriction of 

the Government's functions as an employer is the 
natural and necessary attitude of the public toward 
the Government. By parity of reasoning, if the issu- 
ance of Government licenses to employes of private 
concerns properly involves the licensees in an obliga- 
tion to accept or continue in service against their own 
inclination, it follows thai the number of vocations in 
which licenses are required should be reduced to the 
minimum, and, if possible, to the point of abolishing 

all requirements of the sort. In a word, the public, 
i. e., the Government, must either reaped the indi- 
vidual rights — religious, political and economic of its 

employes in all civil branches, or it must be content, to 

forego the functions of employer and to leave these 
in private hands, as an alternative which will make 
lip in the conservation id' personal liberty that which 

it loses in the matter of public convenience. 

If it should appear upon a complete review of the 
situation that public service does rightly and n 
sarily Involve a surrender of private rights, public 
service will by that fact become a thing to !»■ mini 

mi/.ed, not extended. A conception of society in v 
everything is owned and operated by the public ami in 
which all public servants ari' SUbjecl to the whim of 
the "Ibads of Departments'' is repugnant to popular 

liberty. Public ownership, of postoffices, railro 

itreel cars or dump-carts, may b.' a tine thing, but (lie 
political proscription of labor i-i too big a price to pay 
lor I he pleasure. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A CooK's Experience. 



The writer joined the ship Landseer in 
Philadelphia on February 5, L880, and on that 

day sailed for San Francisco. From that time 
until her arrival, on August 10, of the same 
year, there was nothing but hunger, starva- 
tion and brutality. It commenced as soon as 
we got beyond the Delaware Breakwater. The 
captain called aft the full crew of sixteen 
men. and asked the men how they wished to 
be fed— whether they desired the allowance 
prescribed by law or to have '•full and 
plenty." without allowances. The men. know- 
ing that the law's allowance was not enough, 
were willing to pet •'full and plenty.'" as the 
captain said. There was a book presented to 
the men. represented as a log-book, which they 
were bluffed into signing. After they had 
oed it, the captain crave his instructions to 
the steward, and the next day he began cut- 
ting down lower than what was allowed by 
law. The ship, on her previous voyage, had 
e from San Francisco to Liverpool and 
thence to Philadelphia. There being wheat in 
the cargo, the Japanese cook was ordered to 
roast that and give it to the sailors, in lieu of 
coffee. There must have been considerable of 
this roasted wheat, as I found half a sack on 
board when I joined her. The instructions 
given to the steward were that he should give 
this wheat, mixed with some moldy bread, 
which had remained in the ship on the arrival 
in Philadelphia from Liverpool, to the crew 
before any of the new stores were opened. 
The men soon became dissatisfied with it and 
commenced growling at the cook. Th 
informed them it was not his fault, and rec- 
ommended that they speak to the captain, 
which they did. and he presented them with 
the book bearing their signatures and claimed 
the right to say what was sufficient quantity 
and good quality, and that they would receive 
no better. 

The cook then threw the burned wheat over- 
board, although this was unknown to the cap- 
tain, the crew not knowing what their sup- 
posed coffee consisted of. This forced the 
captain to open up the new coffee he had on 
board, which was not as good as the wheat, as 
it was only ehickory. which he had procured 
in Liverpool. 

The crew were each of a different national- 
ity, and as a result were divided among them- 
selves on racial and religious lines. There 
were twenty-two men on board the ship, offi- 
cers and crew. From this the reader may 
know how plentiful was the food on board. 
when I say a barrel of pork was to last thirty 
days, one of beef twenty days and one of 
Hour fifteen days. We had a long p 
(one hundred and eighty-six days) and dur- 
ing that time there was not one pound of fresh 
meat, canned or otherwise, allowed, although 
the ship had on board two years' provisions. 
The men had subsisted all that time on salt 
- and salty rain-water, which they had 
caught, while there were two thousand gallons 
of fresh water taken from the Delaware River 
that had not cost anything on board on ar- 
rival, which the men might have used; but by 
saving this water the less it would cost him on 
leaving San Francisco. We had four sailors 
laid up with scurvy when we got to San Fran- 
cisco, and one named Martin, a S aied 
on his way to the hospital. The captain of 
that ship was named Captain Eliza Noel, be- 
longing to Brooster, Cape Cod. The writer of 
this article was an eye-witness of these occur- 
- cook of the ship. This is 



only part of his experience of thirty years' 
seagoing, for lie has himself been many a day 
hungry on board ships. On arrival. 1 made a 
promise not to go on deep water again, and 
have not done so up to date. I was personally 
acquainted with the owners of the vessel that 
I have here mentioned, they being George C. 
Cora ..v. To., of Boston. 

Geo. C. Bannister. 
San Francisco. 



British and German Ships. 



During the last twenty years a great change 
has taken place as to the tonnage of all the 
larger sea-transportatioti companies of Eng- 
land and Germany. Among the twenty-five 
English and six German companies with more 
than 100.000 gross register tonnage each, 
there is but one. the English Anchor line. 
whose tonnage now is less than it was in 1884. 
Among the English companies the British 
India Steam Navigation Company heads the 
list with 446,000 gross register tonnage. In 
1884, it had 174.000 gross register tonnage 
and was second only to the Peninsular and 
Oriental Steam Navigation Company, which 
to-day occupies third place. 

The English White Star line, second on 
the list of to-day. had only 58,000 gross reg- 
ister tonnage in 1884, occupying the eleventh 
place: since then it has increased its tonnage 
to 388.000 gross register tonnage. This con- 
siderable amount is divided among thirty-one 
eels, so that the average tonnage of each 
White Star steamer is about 12,01 'tw- 

ister tons. The White Star line can boast 
that, as far as the average tonnage of its ves- 
sels is concerned, it is unsurpassed by any 
other company in the world. 

Next in tonnage follows the Peninsular and 
Oriental Company. Its fleet, which in 1884 
had more than 175.000 gross register tonnage. 
and was then considered the greatest naviga- 
tion company in the world, has for the last 
few years been steadily receding: it. however, 
still has a gross register tonnage of 326.000 
tons, nearly double that of 1884. 

The next greatest company. Elder Demp- 
ster Company, had at one time a greater ton- 
nage than in 1904. otherwise it resembles the 
White Star line in rapid growth. Its present 
tonnage of 312.000 gross register tons is about 
:i times as large as its tonnage in 1884 
The Union Castle line is a fusion of two com- 
panies, the Union and the Castle lines, which 
in 1884 had an aggregate tonnage of 96.000 
3S register tons. To-day it has 298.000 
- ster tons. Then follow five com- 
panies of about the same tonnage each — the 
Leyland line, with 261.000 gross register 
53,000 in 1^-4 ; the Ellerman line, 
an twenty years old. with 260,000 gross 
register tons: Alfred Holt & Co., with 254,- 
51,000 in 1—4 : the Cunard line, with 
51,000 in 1—4 . This company had 
in 1903 only 148.000 gross register tonnage, 
but the new steamers built with governmental 
aid have raised it from fourteenth to ninth 
place among the English lines. Like the 
White Star line, it uses almost exclusively 
••toamers. the average tonnage of which 
is 10,500. 

The Allan line, with 203.000 _ ist.-r 

tonnage (68.000 in 1884), closes the list of 
English companies with more than 200.000 
gross register tonnage. 

The German sea navigation companies con- 
about 50 per cent of the Hamburg- 
American line and the North-German Lloyd. 



Twenty years ago the Hamburg-American 

line had a fleet of about 60,000 gross register 
tonnage. To-day it owns a steamer fli 
719.000 grass register tonnage, according to 
its last annual report. The North-German 
Lloyd had 103.000 gross register tonnage in 

1884, which in 1904 had increased to .".7::. >. 

Both companies have therefore, in the short 
time of twenty years, surpassed all English 
lines. To-day they stand at the head of all 
sea navigation companies in the world. 
Third place among the German lines 
eupied by the "Hansa" Company, which is 
about twenty years old and has 215,000 gross 
register tonnage. All the other German lines 
have less than 200.000 gross register tonnage. 
Only the Hamburg-South American, the Ger- 
man-Australian, and the "Kosmos" lines 
have more than 100.000 gross register tonnage 
each. 



British and Irish Emigration. 



A new return has just been issued for the 
first time by the British Government. It is 
the counterpart of the alien immigration re- 
turns, and deals with the number of passen- 
gers who leave England for places out of Eu- 
rope, discriminating between the British Em- 
pire and foreign countries. It appears that in 
the month of July, 21,000 Britons emigrated, 
two-thirds being from England, 4.392 from 
Scotland, and 2.631 from Ireland. That is a 
reduction of 1,664 as compared with the cor- 
responding month of last year. As regards 
the past seven months, British emigrants 
numbered about 151,000. an increase of 13.- 
447. England contributed 98,460, Scotland 
24.116. and Ireland 28.333. 

Of British and Seoteh emigrants, rather 
more than one-half go to British colonies, and 
Canada takes by far the greatest proportion 
of them. The Irish, however, prefer the 
United States, with the result that the Repub- 
lic gets more of British people than Canada. 
It is claimed that the English and Scotch are 
far more partial to the Dominion than to the 
United States, and sent 55,000 emigrants 
there as against 2.000 Irish in the seven 
months. South Africa holds the next place in 
popularity, and has taken nearly 13,000 Brit- 
ons in the seven months, while Australia at- 
tracted 6,325. The returns also show that 
110.000 foreigners left the United Kingdom. 
chiefly for the United Stat. s, in the past seven 
months. 



The German lawyers an liable in dan 
to their clients for evil results consequent up- 
on misleading advice. The Supreme Court of 
Germany has recently rendered a decision that 
an attorney-at-law is liable to his client to 
the full extent for carelessly giving in© 
advice. The court held that the attorney who. 
for pay. gives his client in legal mattei 
vice as to certain conduct and procedure is 
liable for the legal consequence suffered by 
the client in acting thereon, provided that 
such advice is not only faulty, but has been 
proven to have been given carelessly. Through 
the expressly stated or tacit offer of remun- 
eration for information and advice concern- 
ing a question, an attorney tacitly assumes the 
position of debtor of the client, which obliges 
him to be careful in giving advice, and he is 
therefore liable for its consequence if he has 
failed through ear 



Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



£6XS&s®S®S)®^^ 



i^^'^T^^tT/^^^^^^^^^c 




On the Atlantic Coast. 



(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions.) 



Firemen's Affairs. 



The regular semi-annual session of the Ex- 
ecutive Board of the Atlantic Coast Marine 
Firemen's Union convened in Norfolk, Va., 
on October 5, 1905; Sullivan of New York, 
Robertson of Philadelphia, Connor of Nor- 
folk, and Mahoney of Boston present. Daniel 
Sullivan, of New York, was elected chairman j 
James T. Mahoney, of Boston, secretary. 

The chairman, after calling the Board to 
order and briefly stating the purport of the 
meeting, gave an outline of the Union 's stand- 
ing in the various ports along the Coast. The 
conditions in New York, he said, had been ex- 
cellent during the past year, the Union's ship- 
ping in that port having increased 90 per cent 
since the last meeting of the Board. The 
agents also reported that their respective 
branches were on a sound basis, and generally 
regarded the prospects for the future as more 
than ordinarily promising. 

In the afternoon all hands went across the 
bay to Newport News. They found that port 
completely rid of crimps, and all the shipping 
done through the local Union office. Men 
were, however, very scarce, both there and in 
Norfolk. 

On the 6th the Board re-convened in Nor- 
folk; all members present. After transacting 
some routine business, the question of the In- 
ternational Seamen's Union affiliating with 
the International Transport Workers' Federa- 
tion, as per resolution found on page 25 of the 
Proceedings of the last convention of the I. 
S. U. of A., was ordered to be referred to a 
referendum vote of the Union. Some discus- 
sion arose about organizing the colored fire- 
men sailing out of Norfolk, Baltimore and ad- 
jacent ports. It was recommended that a res- 
olution be placed upon the annual ballot mak- 
ing the initiation for colored firemen in said 
ports $2.50, the same to be decided by a refer- 
endum vote of the Union. Relative to affilia- 
tion with State bodies of the A. F. of L., it 
was unanimously recommended that Head- 
quarters and branches immediately affiliate 
therewith. 

"When the Board re-convened on the 7th, 
the chairman dwelt at some length and with 
much emphasis upon the urgent necessity of 
enforcing the collection of the reserve fund. 
The Board recommended action along the 
lines suggested by the chairman. The chair- 
man also submitted his books for examina- 
tion by the Board. These were carefully in- 
spected and the Board unanimously reported 
all entries found therein correct. The Board 
adjourned sine die in the afternoon. Secre- 
tary Sullivan, on his way back to New York, 
inspected conditions in Philadelphia, and re- 
ports them to be excellent. It was impossible 
to hold a meeting, however, as all the men 
were at work. 



Much in life that men think great and 
grand is simply so because of its contiguity. 
Nearness lends enchantment to many things 
which would be swallowed by distance. 



If it were as easy to determine beforehand 
what will do good as it is to determine what 
will do harm, the science of government would 
be one of the most exact. 



Immigration Evils. 

Our immigration problem just now is of a 
kind to cause anxiety to serious-minded citi- 
zens. This country is large, rich and fertile 
in an unusual degree, we know ; but the ques- 
tion is: How long can we stand having in- 
jected into our national life every year more 
than a million of immigrants whose ethnologi- 
cal qualifications for citizenship are steadily 
becoming less and less desirable? Instead of 
having our population increased and strength- 
ened by the infusion of new blood from those 
countries whose inhabitants are related to us 
by ties of race, language, laws, customs, and 
those standards of living and social and po- 
litical ethics which have made this country 
great, we have recently allowed the United 
States to become the universal dumping 
ground of the most unprogressive of the 
world's peoples. The notable increase in late 
years of crimes of violence in the various 
States, and the general lowering of our na- 
tional business morality, which is so plainly 
observable everywhere, may in a large meas- 
ure be traced to our fatuous non-discrimina- 
tion in the matter of immigration. The social 
and moral ethics of the nations of Southeast- 
ern Europe and Asia Minor are not such as 
the founders of this Republic would have 
wished to have grafted onto our national life. 
Yet it is from those parts of the world that 
the great majority of our immigrants are now 
coming, and have been coming for a number 
of years. It is useless to deny that this has 
had and will continue to have a perceptible ef- 
fect in changing the national character. It has 
already had such effect, as above stated; and 
as the same causes are increasingly at work it 
is only a natural inference that the effects will 
become still more marked. In view of this, it 
is high time that Governmental cognizance 
were taken of our immigration problem. A 
nation, like an individual, has a natural right 
to exclude from its territory all objectionable 
persons. Quality of population is always a 
greater desideratum than mere quantity ; and 
as there is such an abundance of immigrants 
to choose from, common discretion should dic- 
tate a policy of elimination which would at 
any rate assure us against the admission into 
the country of persons naturally unfit to be- 
come citizens. Least of all should this coun- 
try become the asylum for such unspeakable 
scoundrels as those who have made us ac- 
quainted with the "cadet" evil, the "Black 
Hand" and "Mafia" outrages, and the degra- 
dation of padrone labor. 



Child Labor. 



This age might fittingly be described as the 
"talking age." From every pulpit and edi- 
torial sanctum in the land the insurance 
grafters are being unmercifully denounced. 
All the leading newspapers devote pages daily 
to reporting the proceedings of the Armstrong 
investigating committee. Yet, it is a moral 
certainty that no insurance thief will ever be 
sent to jail, and that as soon as we get another 
national scandal to talk about they will re- 
sume their business of swindling the public at 
the same old stand. Yea, verily, this is a 
"talking" plus "nothin' doin' " age. 



Amid all the disheartening conditions of 
selfishness, ignorance and brutalizing poverty, 
it is gratifying to note that the number of 
those earnestly seeking to improve the lot of 
those less fortunate than themselves is stead- 
ily growing. The American Humane Asso- 
ciation, for instance, recently held its regu- 
lar annual convention in Philadelphia, and 
its president, "William 0. Stillman, in the 
course of his opening address, spoke on the 
subject of child labor, as follows: 

Our societies should give greater attention to the 
procuring and enforcement of proper Child-Labor 
laws. When one studies the condition of child labor 
in the cotton mills of the South and the coal fields of 
the North, it is found practically as bad, and even 
worse in some respects than that which characterized 
slavery before the Civil War, and it is a slavery even 
more odious and unendurable than that which 
shackled the black race. It is notorious that hun- 
dreds of thousands of children who ought to be in 
school, are forced to work in sweatshops and factories. 
They become wrecked in health and die prematurely. 
The survivors fill hospitals, and ultimately many of 
them almshouses. The horrors of this unrighteous 
situation are not realized by those who have not 
studied it most carefully. What i3 greatly needed is 
uniform Child-Labor laws in the different States, with 
a rising standard as soon as justified. 

The child-labor evil has attained its presenl 
alarming dimensions simply because the im- 
mediate sufferers from it, the children, are 
too weak to make an effective protest in their 
own behalf. Human nature is essentially 
selfish, and in the hurly-burly of this money- 
chasing age its inherent selfishness has been 
preternaturally aggravated. Hence those so- 
cial evils which are not brought home to us 
directly never receive the attention or sym- 
pathy which our hearts, if rightly keyed, 
would bestow as a duty of our common hu- 
manity. This indifference of the average man 
to evils which are unseen, but which he yet 
knows must inevitably react detrimentally 
upon himself, is simply a phase of that pecu- 
liar twist in human nature whereby, as Pitt 
once pointed out, the shirt can be taxed off a 
man's back indirectly, but which makes us re- 
sist direct taxation almost to the death. This 
is all wrong, of course, for every man of com- 
mon intelligence knows that child labor is in- 
jurious to the race as a whole, and that it is 
our duty collectively and individually to do 
what we can to protect the race against that 
particular injury. The most effective way at 
present to compass that object is undoubtedly 
to be found in uniform Child-Labor laws 
throughout the different States. 



Naval Desertions. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



Just now the naval seamen's periodical kick- 
about unseasonable and insufficient food is go- 
ing the rounds of the Eastern press. The 
battleship Kentucky, for instance, has been 
nicknamed the "bean ship," from the fre- 
quency with which beans, a la Boston and a 
la free-lunch-joint, are served to the crew. 
The Kentucky has been in commission only a 
little over a year, yet to-day it is stated that 
of the original crew not one remains, all hav- 
ing deserted in the meantime, and she is now 
150 men short of her complement. And so it 
seems to be all along the line of Admiral 
Evans' squadron. Desertions are literally 
every-day occurrences, and in every instance 



(Continued on page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Home News. 



W. J. Bryan was presented to the Mi 
kado, at Tokio, Japan, on October 21. 

President Roosevelt, now on a tour of 
the Southern States, is being warmly 
welcomed everywhere. 

Ex-Congressman Jerry Simpson is re- 
ported to lie lingering between life and 
death in the St. Francis Hospital at 
Wichita, Kas. 

Robert Gardner, the "man with the 
ossified neck," whom, it was asserted, 
hanging would not kill, has been sen- 
tenced at Chicago, 111., to life imprison- 
ment for murder. 

Translation of captured Filipino re 
ports has been completed in Washington. 
The reports show what the [slanders 
thought and did during the insurrection 
in 1899 and 1900. 

The Lewis and Clark Exposition closed 
at Portland, Or., on October 14. The at- 
tendance exceeded 2,540,000, and then- 
remains a surplus of $120,000. The Ex- 
position is declared a financial success. 

The largest shipment of silver made 
from Vancouver, B. *'., went out on Oc- 
tober 16 on the steamer Tartar, con- 
signed to Hongkong. Tt weighed a ton 
and a half, with a value of about $2,- 
000,000. 

The civil Service Commission has made 

a charge against United States Circuit 
Judge Baker, of Indiana, of soliciting 
and accepting campaign contributions, 
and referred the matter to the Depart- 
ment of Justice. 

The Supreme Court of Xebraska has 

handed down decisions sustaining the 
constitutionality of the Anti-cigarette 
law, the Inheritance Tax law and the law 

to prevent desecration of the American 
flag. 

W. II. Denny, cashier of the First Na- 
tional Bank at Williston, X. !>., who was 
arrested on a charge of having received 
stolen horses, has been discharged be 
cause of a lack of sufficient evidence to 
warrant holding the accuse. I. 

The Chinese Government is preparing 
to make claims against the United States 
for the refusal to admit Chinese sub- 
jects. These claims are being held at the 
Chinese Legation ill Washington until 
their aggregate is more than $1,000,000. 

A tornado struck the village of Soren- 
to, 111., thirty-two miles northeast of St. 
Louis, on October 17, killing eight per- 
sons, injuring thirty-five others, of whom 

three probably will die, and (hung a 

great amount of damage to property. 

Revised figures on the attendance at 
the Lewis and Clark Exposition at Port- 
land, Or., show that a total of 2,551,780 

persons passed into the grounds during 

the Exposition period, of these 1,580,- 

» > 1 7" were paid and 971,163 were free. 
Acting under instructions of the 

United States Attorney-General, District 
Attorney Breckona of Honolulu, T. II., 
has instituted the first ,,)' a number of 
injunction suits for the purpose of 
breaking up the local trusts. 

John Newton Williamson, Congress 
man from Oregon for the Second Dis- 
trict, was sentenced in the United States 
Court at Fort land, Or., on October 14 
to serve ten months' imprisonment and 
pay a fine of $500 for complicity in the 
land frauds. An appeal litis been taken. 

The Commissioner of the General Land 

Office lias ordered the withdrawal from 
entry of all the public land in area I. 
covering 1,100,000 acres of land ill the 

Bozeman and Lewiston (Mont.) land dis- 
tricts, on account of tie- land basin irri- 
gation project in that State. 

Commissioner Wagner of the Pension 

Bureau has announced his intend- 

□amending tin- dismissal from the 

s, rvice of a number of employes who had 

been engaged in loaning money in the 
Bureau at usurious rates. He says that 
in some cases as high as 1(1 per cent per 
month has been charged. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BRILLIANTS 

CLOTH I NG STOR E 
SAN PEDRO. CAL. 

We make a Specialty of Handling only the Best Goods Manufactured 

for Seamen. 

YOU WILL FIND THE UNION LABEL ON OUR GOODS ALSO. 



LIPPflAN BROS. 

CLOTHING AND SHOE STORE 

"We Carry the Finest and Most Up-to-date makes 
of Union Made Goods 

WIEDWALD BLOCK, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD WINES AND 

LIQUORS. 

BOTTLERS OF SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES BEERS. 

All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. 

We buy direct from Kentucky Distilleries and our California Wineries. 

Seafaring men invited to inspect our stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



JOHN HELANDER 

Dealer In 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

Groceries, Provisions, Cigars 

Fourth Street, near Beacon, 
San Pedro, Cal. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO, 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and all San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



J. P. SYLVA, Jr. 

Dealer in 

Groceries, Hay and Grain, also Green 

Fruits and Country Produce 

BEACON ST., bet. Fourth and Fifth. 
Phone No. 164. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drug's, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Article*. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



LETTER LIST. 



C. L. MUNSON 

Dealer in 
CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front. Street, opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



FRED 


SVENDSEN 




-•- 


UNION 


EXPRESS 


AND DRAY CO. 




— •— 


STAND AT FRONT STREET 


SAN 


PEDRO, CAL. 



CIGAR AND TOBACCO STORE 

JACOB OLSEN, No. 324, Prop. 



THE BEST CIGARS IN TOWN. 



Store on Fourth Street, near Beacon, 
SAN PEDRO, CAD. 



SEASIDE MARKET 

CAPTAIN McVICAR and R. L. BAAND 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Beef, Fork, Mutton and Sausages of all Kinds 

Meats Inspected by U. S. Inspectors. 
FRONT STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Vessels Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
Telephone 203. 




PEOPLE'S BARGAIN STORE 

Headquarters for UNION HADE CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing' Goods, Boots and 

Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 

Outfits. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 

i Ent., Front and Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 



UNION CIGAR AND 
TOBACCO STORE 

- elias weberg, Proprietor. 
Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Union-Made Cigars, Tobaccos, Pipes, 
Notions, Etc. 



SEE THAT THIS LABEL 
IS ON THE KEG OR BOTTLE 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 
Undertaker and Embalmer 

FOURTH ST. 

Bet. Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 




UNION LABEL 



OF THE 



UNITED HATTERS 



OF N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either soft or 
stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union Label is sewed 
in it. The Genuine Union Label is perforated on the 
four edges exactly the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer has loose labels 
in his possession and offers to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize him. 
Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. Unprincipled manufacturers are 
using them in order to pet rid of their scab-made hats. The John B. Stetson 
Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., is a non-union concern. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. T. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 
Andersen, Chan. A. Jurgensen, Wllhelm 
Andersen, Auel P. Johannesen-lGf.7 
Andersen, Alsel Karlson, Gus. E. 

Andersen, Auel-HGOKlahn. K. 
Admand, I. Knutsen, Knut 

Andersson, E. Krietsamtn. Ferd. 

Andreasen, Edward Kronvall, Oskar 
Anderron, A. E.-906Kammermans, W. 
Anderron, A. J. Kenris, Hans 

Anderron. A.-1055 Krehsman, Martin 
Absolonsen. Ole M. Kauall. Erik 
Andersen-515 Kirstein, J. -626 

Andersen, A. B. Koso, J. -590 

Andersen, Joseph Kahlbetzer. Fred 
Anderson, Olaf Knudsen. 11 

Anderson, W. G. Roster, Paul 
Anderson, S. Ladelane, John 

Anderson, W.-991 Lputler. John 
Andreasen, N. S. Larsen, Louis-536 
Angelbeck, G. Lindholm, Nestor 

Appelgren, John Lund, Cnarles-599 

Arkerlund-1 263 Lieman, Alkee 

Borjerron, B. E. Larsen, Robert 
Bogan, Patrick Lie. Carl-1042 

Brantburg, a. G.-Lund, Martin 

1306 Lindgvist. Ernst 

Boyd. Andrew-1379 Buksie. F.,-689 
Blom. C'hr. A. Lindholm, E. 

Barnekow, A. O. I.ehtinen. A. -961 

Bray, John K. I.arsen. Ed., Photos. 

Bernard, sanuaha Maatta, John 
Buch, David Magnussen-1147 

Bergerren, A. C. McAdam, J. 
Booth, A. J. McHume, W. H. 

Bohman, Erik Moore, James 

Brillowski, Moritz Michael, Walter 
Brown, W. J. Mikkelsson, Alfred 

Berg-, Gustaf Mjornes, Arne 

Buberg, Nils-989 Nelson, Frank 
Beuren, C. Nelson, Julius 

Bracca, G.-Reg. let. Nielsen, K. N. 

P. ( >. Nielson, N. G. 

Bergqvist, J. A. Nielsen, Niels Chr. 
Berntsen, O.-1280 Nielsen. Herger 
Blanemo, Oscar Nielsen, Niels A. -614 

Blohie, I.e Henry Nielsen-558 
Brandt, Wm.. Nalder, George 

Bregler, Friedrlch Nllsen-780 
Carlson, Fred Nummelin. A. 

Carlson. J. -388 Nllsen, Jens A. 

Cheodore, Bodlou Nilsen, Sigurd 
Chrlstensen, Harry Xystrom, Emil 
Christiansen. Ludv. Nylund, John 
i "offman. Milo Olsen. Erlk-726 

Danlelsen, Gustav olsen, John B. 
Damianie, Alessan-Olsen, Emil 

dro Olsen, S. B. 

Davey, C. Olsen, Ernst 

Diener, Allk Olsen, Oscar-630 

Duis, I. -547 Olavesen, Sven. A. 

Edson, Frank Olsen, Wm.-753 

Edlund. J. A. Ohlsson, O. 

Ellason, K. A. Perouwer, G. 

Kvensen. <\-4S4 Petersen, Chris. 

Eriksen-589 Pettonen. K. H. 

I l iksson-333 Petterson, Auel 

Ekluna. S. Pettersen. Olaf-982 

Ellingren, Frithjof Persson, B. S.-754 
Eriksen. Martin Pedersen-896 

Esper. Theodore Pearson, Charles 

Engstrom, C. E. Petersen-903 

Freastad, Hans Pad, S. V.-478 

Fernandez, B. Poulsen, M. P. 

Forstrom, H. Rasmussen, Adolph 

mler. A. Rasmussen, Edw. 

Foldat, John Rasmussen, Victor 

Gronvall, Johan F. Redehman-505 
Gunlach, John Reld, James-326 

Gulbransen. And. RJetad. S. J. -1355 
Gronberg, Erik Rudl, A. M.-677 

Goodmunden, Joh's Roni, Erik 
Graff, Ed. Reay, Stephen A. 

Gustatfson, J.-432 Rohde. Robert 
Gustafson, A. F. Rudolph, Fritz-Reg. 
Gustafson, Oskar lett. P. O. 

Hansen, August Sorensen, M. -Photo 
Hansen. J. Sorensen, C.-1664 

Holtte, John Svendsen, Christ 

Heckman, Victor Scholer. Edvin 
Hublnette, E. N. Stalsten, Karl 
Harllff, Henry Bchatze, Otto 

Hellman. M. J. K. Saunders. Carl 
Ham. It. T. Stokes, Charles 

Hazel. Wm. Selzer. Matt. 

Hansen. Harry Sinford, Mr. 

Halberg, <\ H. Sands, Harry 

Hill. Prank Smith, Henry 

Hlnze, August Bundquist, W. W. 

Hakanssen, Fred'k Solberg, Bernt 
Hansen. Hans S. Skogsfjord, Olaf 
Hansen, Karl Samsio, S. 

n-676 Sandon-1579 

Hansen, Laurlts Sanltone, J. 
Haraldsson-1204 Smith, Pat. 

Henrlksen. K. Smith, Paul 

Aug.-Reg.Sodergvlst, Otto 

letter. Strand, Ednar 
Imbnla, August Svenssen, Hans M. 
Ingebretsen, HaldorSwanson, C. 
[ngebretsen, Johan Tornqvlst, A. N. 
Jacobsen, Peder Ttkander, T. M. 
Jansson, A. -351 Tomask, Math. 
Jansson. Edward J. Verbrugge, D. 
Janson, Oscar Verzona, Felix 
Jeshke, Hans Wahlste.it. A. R .-778 
Johansen, E. H. Wahlman. J. - Reg. 
Johansen, E. W. letter P. O. 
Johansen, Gunen Warren. W. A. 
Johnson. Emil-1576 Westergren, Carl 
Jordan, C. Wahlstedt, Rafael 
Johanssen-1428 Weldeman, Frank 
.Lilians, ("has. Wikstrom. W. 
Jorgensen, Th. Wirtanen, Gustaf 
Jorgensen, Walter Warm. Arthur 
Johansson, Charles Wisbel, Johannes 
Jeskke. Hans Westerholm, Aug. 
Johnsson. O. W. Wilson. Edward 
Jensen, Julius L. Yves. Allaisu 
Johannesen, HansH.Yerna, Frank 
.Jensen. Rasmus Zugehaer. Alex. 
Jarvinen. Karl (',. Zeidler. Kred 
Johansson, Anders Zimmerman. Fritz 
Jorgensen, J. W. Zillmann, Bernhard 
Johnson, Otto 



ASTORIA, OR. 



COLUMBIA RIVER 

Fishermen's Protective Union 

Headquarters, Astoria, Or. 

H. M. LORNTSEN, Secretary, 

P. O. Box 138. 

The Reading Room Is open at all 

times to Members of the 

Sailors' Union. ■* 



When making purchases from our adver- 
tisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen 's Journal. 



i 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. |] 



1 



Facts About New YorK. 






The Japanese Navy Department has announced the 
seizure of the American steamer Centennial, on Octo- 
ber 10, in Soya Strait. 

The French ship Leon Bureau, now at San Fran- 
cisco, has been chartered to load lumber at that port 
and Eureka for Europe. 

The Spreckels tugboat Relief arrived at San Fran- 
cisco on October 20 from San Pedro, towing the 
schooner Muriel, which recently went ashore at the 
latter port. 

Having sailed entirely around the world and half 
way back in ballast, seeking cargo, the French bark 
General De Sonis, Captain M. Hermit arrived at Port 
Angeles, Wash., on October 17, from Hobart, Tas- 
mania, for orders. The trip around the world is said 
in shipping circles to be a record for a sailing vessel, 
the General De Sonis having made it in seventy-nine 
sailing days. 

The report of the final signing of the peace treaty 
between Japan and Russia having officially reached 
Mare Island, the Imperial royal ensign of Russia was 
displayed from the mainmast of the cruiser Lena on 
October 18. From that hour on the marine patrol, 
which has been constantly on guard at the ship ever 
since she reached the Island, was relieved from fur- 
ther duty. 

The steamer Claudine, well known in the Hawaiian 
interisland service, sailed from San Francisco for 
Honolulu on October 17. For several months past the 
Claudine has been at the former port undergoing an 
overhauling and repairing, and is now in first-class 
condition. Under the command of Captain Bennett 
she will resume service between Honolulu and various 
Island points. 

The Norwegian steamer Tellus, from Kobe, to re- 
enter the coal trade between British Columbia minis 
and San Francisco, is to be fined for leaving Nanaimo 
to proceed to Ladysmith without reporting. The 
Western Fuel Company, which chartered the steamer, 
was not ready to ship from Nanaimo, so the steamer 
proceeded to Ladysmith, omitting the necessary report 
outward at the Nanaimo Customs. 

A telegram received at San Francisco on October 14 
reported that the four-masted steel barkentine Alta, 
owned by A. P. Lorentzen of the former port, had 
discharged her cargo at Manila, and was on the beach 
in a leaky condition. The Alta flies the Chilean flag, 
although owned by an American. The Alta, with other 
vessels, was the victim of the terrific storm that lately 
swept over the Philippine Islands. 

Repairs to the Pacific Coast Steamship Company's 
steamer Spokane, now at the Union Iron Works, San 
Francisco, are expected to cost in the neighborhood of 
$11,000. The Spokane stranded on Wrangel Narrows 
on her trip from Alaska, but was not seriously dam- 
aged, the vessel having double bottoms. But before 
again going into service the Spokane will go into dry- 
dock for repairs. 

Civil Engineer H. H. Rosseau, of the Mare Island 
(Cal.) Navy Yard, in his annual report to the Sec- 
retary of the Navy, strongly urges the development of 
the Mare Island Yard into a large and well equipped 
naval base. He recommends the quick completion of 
the improvement of the channel in Mare Island Strait 
and the enlargement of the present facilities at the 
yard by the construction of new buildings and roads. 

Advices have been received at Victoria, B. C, that 
a combination had been formed of Japanese shipping 
firms to send tramp steamers to the United States and 
Europe with cargoes from Japanese and Indo-Japan- 
ese points, carrying freight- at a low rate — about one- 
third of the present rate. The sixty-six steamers 
which were captured while running contraband and 
confiscated by the prize crews will be used in connec- 
tion with the fleet now in use by the Government to 
bring home the troops. 

The Union Iron Works has been awarded a contract 
for repairing the hull of the Oceanic liner Alameda. 
Several bids for the work were received, that of the 
Union Iron Works, for about $30,000, being substan- 
tially the lowest. In addition to the v.ork on the hull, 
there is much to be done on the Alameda before she 
can be again made ready for service, and there is a 
probability that all the work will be done by the 
Union Iron Works. It is expected that the Alameda 
will be ready for service again by December 1. 

For the second time within a dozen years John C. 
Hampton and his sisters, Mrs. Tyson and Mrs. Mau- 
vais, have failed in their effort to obtain $100,000 
damages from the Occidental and Oriental Steamship 
Company for the death of their parents in the wreck 
of the City of Chester, seventeen years ago. The jury 
in Judge Hunt's court at San Francisco on October 
18 returned a verdict for the defendants. The case 
was first tried eleven years ago, with the same result, 
but was sent back for re-trial by the Supreme Court. 

The new freight steamer Bessie Dollar was launch- 
ed from a Port Glasgow (Scotland) shipyard on 
October 17, according to a telegram received recent- 
ly. She is a duplicate of the Hazel Dollar, recently 
arriving on the Coast, and is owned by the Robert 
Dollar Steamship Company. The launching was at- 
tended by Melville Dollar, whose wife, after whom 
the steamship is named, christened the vessel. Cap- 
tain Gow will bring the new steamer out to the Coast, 
when she will engage in the lumber trade to the Orient. 

Four libel suits were begun on October '!, in the 
United States District Court against the gasoline tow- 
boat George R, Bailey. The suits are brought, in 
one complaint, by Herzog & Dahl for electrical sup- 
plies furnished between June and October, 1905, val- 
ued at $446.10, Of whicli'it is claimed but $100 lias been 
paid- Todt & Peters, who claim a balance due on 
blacksmith work of $269.96; D. S. Cartwright, for $28 
worth of hauling, and L. M. Coggins, for a balance of 



$153.21 claimed due on carpenter work done on the 
towboat. 

The steamer Lyra, at Victoria, P.. C, bring-; news 
that the Russian Government lias established a trade 
route via the Arctic passage to the mouth of the Ye 
nesei to re-enforce the transsiberian route. Sea-going 
steamers will run from Russian ports by way of the 
Polar Ocean and the Kara Sea to the mouth of the 
Yenesei, where depots are established to transship 
their cargoes and passengers to the river ports. The 
barges will be towed to Krassnoyarsk, on the Ye- 
nesei, where connection will be made with the main 
Siberian Railway. 

Captain F. B. Zaddart, First Mate- E. E. Johnson 
and Arthur Self, second-mate, of the steam-schooner 
Santa Barbara, were found guilty by Local Inspectors 
Bolles and Bulger at San Francisco on October 19 of 
unskillful and negligent conduct in connection with 
the wreck of their vessel at Del Mar landing, near 
Gualala Point, on October 1. As a result of the 
findings of the Inspectors, Captain Zaddart had his 
license suspended three months, First-mate Johnson 
loses his for six months and Second-mate Self, who 
was on the bridge at the time of the catastrophe, had 
his license suspended nine months. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at San 
Francisco on October 22: German bark Edmund, 151 
days from Port Talbot for Iquique, 35 per cent. 
French bark St. Donatien, 151 days from Bordeaux 
for Adelaide, 60 per cent. British bark Principality, 
172 days from Junin for Rotterdam, 90 per cent. 
British bark Kilmallie, 154 days from Shields for Ta- 
coma, 10 per cent. British bark Forteviot, 152 days 
from Shields for San Francisco, 15 per cent. French 
bark Duchesse the Berry, 190 days from Swansea for 
San Francisco, 10 per cent. British ship Hilston, 140 
days from Port Talbot for Iquique, 10 per cent. 
British ship M. E. Watson, 140 days from Cardiff for 
Antofagasta, 10 per cent. 

In a local case at Seattle, Wash., the State Supreme 
Court held on October 12 that the master of an ocean- 
going vessel and a seaman are not fellow-servants and 
the owners of the vessel are responsible for injuries 
occurring to seamen through the negligence of the 
master of the vessel. Patrick J. Woods was injured 
on board the steamer Tampico, which was bound from 
Seattle to the Hawaiian Islands. Woods was ordered 
by the master to cleat a sheet which had fouled in the 
shackles. He claims that while at work the master, 
without warning to him, ordered the course of the 
vessel changed, which resulted in a large wave coming 
on board and washing him across the ship. His leg 
was broken and he sued for damages. He secured a 
judgment for $2000, which is affirmed by this decision. 

The Pacific Mail 's annual report shows gross earn- 
ings of $5,775,783. This is an increase of $2,174,017 
over the year before, when the gross receipts were 
$3,601,000. Expenses for the year were $4,480,771, 
leaving a balance of $1,295,012. Out of the latter 
there was deducted $496,000 for depreciation and gen- 
eral and extraordinary repairs of steamers and $371,- 
000 for the lease of new piers in San Francisco. There 
was left, therefore, a surplus for the year amounting 
to $427,656. This is au increase of $180,760 over the 
year before. The company 's fleet includes sixteen 
steamships owned and others leased. With the excep- 
tion of $617,000 owed the Southern Pacific for ad- 
vances, the company had at the close of the year only 
$201,000 of current debts as against $350,000 of cash 
and other available assets. 



DIED. 



Adolf Anderson, No. 881, a native of Sweden, aged 
25, died at San Pedro, Cal., October 18, 1905. 

John Lloyd Lennan, No. 881, a native of Oregon, 
aged 18, died at Empire City, Or., June 9, 1904. 

Thomas Thorn-sen, No. 485, a native of Norway, 
aged 25, lost in the schooner Pearl, in Alaska waters, 
December, 1904. 



HOW'S THIS? 



We offer One Hundred Dollars Reward for any case 
of Catarrh that cannot be cured by Hall 's Catarrh 
Cure. F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, O. 

We, the undersigned, have known F. J. Cheney for 
the last 15 years, and believe him perfectly honorable 
in all business transactions, and financially able to 
carry out any obligations made by his firm. 

Waldino, Kinnan & Marvin, 
Wholesale Druggists, Toledo, O. 

Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken internally, acting di- 
rectly upon the blood and mucous surfaces of the sys- 
tem. Testimonials sent free. Price, 75c. per bottle. 
Sold by all Druggists. 

Take Hall's Family Pills for constipation. 



F. R. Wall, who was for many years an officer in 
the United States Navy, is now practicing marine law 
in San Francisco. He gives claims of all seafarers 
careful attention. Merchants' Exchange building, 
California street, near Montgomery; rooms 208-209 
Phone Bush 508. 



Baglcy 's Sun-Cured is now packed in pouches and 
the fronts will be received assorted with labels from 
the foil packages, for premiums. 



When the New York city schools opened 
it is estimated that 610,000 children applied 
for admission, or about 42,000 more than 
presented themselves on the opening day 
last year. This large increase is one of many 
indications of the rapid growth of the city. 
That the State census which was taken last 
June will show that New York City litis a 
population of considerable over 4,000,000 is 
considered a foregone conclusion. 

Some critics look askance at the celerity 
in which New York is increasing in popula- 
tion. One of the commentators, who deplores 
the "herding together" of so many hundreds 
of thousands of human beings, has made some 
interesting compilations respecting the fear- 
ful pace at which New York moves. 

He has figured it out, for instance, that 
every fifty-five seconds a train reaches this 
city and unloads several hundred nervous 
passengers. 

Every forty-eight minutes a ship enters 
the harbor, either from a foreign country or 
a coast port. 

Every forty seconds tin immigrant enters 
this city, and every two and two-thirds min- 
utes one makes his home here. 

Every six minutes a child is born. 

Death also in New York moves rapidly 
and resistlessly. Every seven minutes it 
starts another funeral through the streets. 
Every hour and three-quarters it strikes some 
one down in an accident; every ten hours it 
drives somebody to suicide, and every two days 
it commits murder. 

Every thirteen minutes a marriage is per- 
formed. 

Every ten seconds the lawyers start a new 
lawsuit, and every twelve hours a new lawyer 
starts out in search of still more litigation. 

A house is built here every fifty-one min- 
utes. 

Although the police, as seen by a casual 
observer about the streets, do not appear to 
be dangerously overworked, yet they make 
an arrest every three minutes. On an aver- 
age, a new prisoner is brought to the Tombs 
every two hours, and every five hours a crim- 
inal is sent from this city to State prison. 



The British Postal authorities have made a 
regulation by which a depositor in the Post- 
office savings bank will be allowed to with- 
draw any sum not exceeding one pound 
sterling ($4.86) from his account without 
previous notice, on producing the deposit 
book at any Postoffice savings hank and satis- 
fying the postmaster thai he is entitled to 

ri ive the money. It has been a drawback 

to the Postoffice savings hank system hither- 
to that the depositor in immediate need of a 
small sum has been unable to obtain it ex- 
cept by paying for an interchange of 
telegrams between the local office and Lon- 
don. The expense and delay of this process 
will now be obviated, and a depositor will be 
enabled to obtained an immediate cash pay- 
ment at any one of the 15,000 Postoffice s;iv- 
inii'S hanks. 



In North America and Europe combined 

the consumption of sugar per capita of their 

populations, according to the German returns 
was as follows: Prom 32.6 pounds in 1902-3 
to :!7.s pounds in 1903-4, an unprecedented 
increase of 5.2 pounds per capita. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 
JOURNAL— 



Published Weekly by 

THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



W. MACARTHUR.... Editor | P. SCHARRENBERG, Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall. - J2.00 | Six months, $1.00 

Single copies, 10 cents each. 
Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Satur- 
day noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco PostofHee as second- 
'■lass matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
southwest corner East and Mission streets, San 
Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, 



OCTOBER 25, L905. 



HISTORY, "AS SHE IS VYKOTE.' 



Our Socialist contemporary, the Cleveland 
Citizen, has discovered the "true inwardness" 
of the great Australian maritime strike! 
That paper, with characteristic modesty, ad- 
mits that the discovery is not entirely its own, 
and gives first credit to its distinguished and 
reliahle informant, the Open Shop, a publi- 
cation which, as indicated by its name, may 
be accepted as authority in all matters of the 
kind. In this Ihe Cleveland Citizen but dein- 
, i! ist rates its own wisdom, since we know that 
learning consists mainly in the judicious se- 
lection of authorities. Observers of events in 
the labor world during the past twelve or fif- 
teen years will doubtless be pleased, as well as 
surprised, to receive this new light upon an 
important event. The light in question is 
diffused over two columns of the Citizen, but 
the particularly luminous ray is that which 
describes the immediate cause of the great in- 
dustrial upheaval. After noting the rela- 
tions previously existing between employers 
and employes in the Antipodes, in which it is 
shown that the lions (the trade-unionists) 
were led by asses (the trade-union officials), 
the new historian proceeds, as follows: 

The cause of quarrel was childish, as McEacharn 
meant it should be. A difference arose between the 
quartermaster and the steward of one of his coasting 
steamers over the charms of a stewardess. The cap- 
tain, to settle the difficulty — as he thought, poor man, 
— discharged the sailor. The union demanded his re- 
instatement. McEacharn, knowing what the reply 
would be, offered to put him on another ship. The 
union demanded reinstatement on the same ship. Mc- 
Eacharn in very courteous terms pointed out that that 
was impossible. Then the asses who led the lions told 
him that unless the reinstatement was effected within 
twenty-four hours they would call the crews off all his 
ships and order a general strike. 

Then, like a flash, McEacharn unmasked his guns. 
Back went the reply that the unions might strike and 
bo damned. 

The strike was ordered. And then there followed a 
battle grim and great. Union after union was called 
out, ship after ship was laid up, State after State was 
involved in the quarrel, until the whole continent stood 
under arms. In less than four weeks the fires of nearly 
every coasting steamer were drawn. The trade of 
Australia was paralyzed. Four hundred thousand 
unionists were idle, and every man of them was draw- 
ing half-pay. Also every unemployed man who looked 
like becoming a free laborer was paid a weekly allow- 
ance from the general fund to prevent remanning the 
ships. 

But flic Shipowners' Union that McEa.harn had or- 
ganized dicta. 1 even try to reman the ships. The land 



boom had reached its limit, trade was declining, very 
large coal reserves had been laid up, the funds and 
membership of the unions were known to a dollar and 
a man. The shipowners simply sat down on their 
hunkers and waited. 

So it now appears that the whole trouble 
was caused by the proverbial and inevitable 
"woman at the bottom of it"! Verily, greal 
results How from small causes. All hail the 
historian who, instead of burrowing for the 
hidden springs of human action, can explain 
the most momentous events upon the simplest 
and apparently most superficial grounds. 
Hereafter we may expect that history shall 
be written in the form of the "problem 
story"; that all its lessons shall be lessons of 
low. and that all the causes of discord be- 
tween men and nations shall be resolved into 
elements of jealous rivalry for the smiles of 
fair woman. The wonder, and sorrow, is that 
the men who made and wrote the history of 
the great Australian maritime strike did not 
themselves realize that they were merely back- 
ing up a childish squabble between a quarter- 
master and a steward over the charms of a 
stewardess. Like the armies of Menelaus and 
Priam, the seamen and shipowners of Austra- 
lia fought all unwitting of the Helen in the 
case. 

Reference to the Journal's accounts of the 
strike ( which, by the way, are composed main- 
ly of official correspondence from both sides 
to the dispute) and to the Australian Govern- 
ment reports on the subject, gives no inkling 
of the cause ascribed by the Cleveland Citi- 
zen's authority. On the contrary, these ac- 
counts put a very serious face on the matter. 
It is interesting, by way of comparison be- 
tween history, "as she is wrote"" by the men 
who make it, and by the men who discover it 
some years later, to briefly review the causes 
of the strike, as related at the period of their 
happening. Organized labor in Australia in 
1890 was powerful and therefore naturally 
disposed to use its power, whether rightfully 
or wrongfully need not here be discussed. 
Practically, the situation then was much the 
same as it has been in the United States dur- 
ing the past few years. The trade-unions had 
established the "Closed Shop" in almost all 
industries. With this growth of labor organ- 
ization there came into existence a counter or- 
ganization of capital, inspired and conducted 
much as is the Citizens' Alliance movement 
of the present day. The shipowners formed a 
branch of this movement, under the title, 
"Steamship Owners' Association of Austral- 
asia." The latter body came into conflict 
with the seamen on the question of increasing 
wages. This question, as the Steamship Own- 
ers afterward declared, might have been ad- 
justed without a strike. However, while that 
question was still being discussed the steam- 
ship officers also made a demand for an in- 
crease of wages and other improvements, the 
must important of which provided for an in- 
crease in the number of officers on certain 
routes. These demands were likewise refused. 
The officers then affiliated with the respective 
central bodies in Victoria, New South Wales 
and New Zealand, and appealed for their as- 
sistance. The Steamship Owners then an- 
nounced that they were willing to consider, 
and possibly grant, the demands of the offi- 
cers, but only upon condition that the latter 
would sever all affiliations with organized 
labor, upon the ground that such affiliations 
were subversive of discipline. This ultimatum 
was rejected by the officers, and they went on 
strike. The seamen, firemen, cooks and stew- 
ards and other crafts walked out in support 
of the officers, and the great strike was on. 



Such are the facts, as admitted by both sides. 
Underlying the questions of increasing wages 
and recognition of the officers' right to affili- 
ate with organized labor there existed the 
fear on the shipowners' part that the seamen 
would "run the business," and, on the sea- 
men's part, that the shipowners would de- 
stroy the unions. Any one who reads the ac- 
counts of the Australian maritime strike of 
1890 can not but note the similarity, both as 
to' cause and as to reasoning, between that 
event and most great strikes of the present 
day. The failure of the Australian strike was 
due, not to the policy of laying up the ves- 
sels, but, on the contrary, to the fact that the 
vessels were run with non-union seamen, the 
presence of whom was due, in turn, to the 
policy of high initiation fees which had there- 
tofore prevailed throughout the country, but 
which was abandoned as a result of the strike. 

Another maritime strike took place in Aus- 
tralia in 1893, caused by a movement on the 
part of the shipowners to greatly reduce 
wages. In neither of these instances do the 
quartermaster, steward or stewardess appear 
in even a subordinate capacity. We see it all 
now. These great characters in the drama 
were reserved for the genius who has just 
flashed upon them the limelight of historical 
truth ! 

Having demonstrated the "childishness" 
of the strike, the article in question goes on to 
show the results, which, in effect, amount to 
complete control of the country by the trade- 
unions. Says the veracious narrator : ' ' Eleven 
years ago the unions were battered, dead, done 
for. To-day their direct lineal successor owns 
the whole blessed Commonwealth of Austra- 
lia." Of course, all this has been brought 
about by political action. Here we have an- 
other new light on history, or rather on the 
facts of to-day. Ordinary observers of Aus- 
tralian affairs have been led to believe that 
the sum of results from the political action of 
the Australian workers is contained in the 
Compulsory Arbitration laws, which meas- 
ures are even now being regarded as of doubt- 
ful advantage. In other words, the political 
victories of our Australian friends are dis- 
tinctly of the Pyrrhic order; they have cost 
more than they are worth. 

In presenting to its readers the new history 
of the Australian maritime strike, the Cleve- 
land Citizen expresses the hope that "every 
reader will carefully peruse the article." "It 
is highly instructive," says our Socialist con- 
temporary, "and the lesson it teaches ought 
to be generally known, no matter what indus- 
trial or political views the reader may hold." 
Quite right. "The lesson it teaches" is two- 
fold; first, that the avowed enemies of organ- 
ized labor will stop at no absurdity in the 
hope of making the labor movement appear 
"childish" in the eyes of uninformed per- 
sons; secondly, that the Socialist press will 
not hesitate to incur suspicion of affinity with 
the "Open Shoppers" by repeating the libels 
and absurdities of the latter, if thereby it can 
make a point for the "propaganda." 



Our esteemed contemporary, the Union 
Record, of Seattle, Wash., has been enlarged 
and generally improved, as the result of a new 
policy recently adopted by the trade-unionists 
of the Northwestern metropolis. The Union 
Record is a worthy representative of the labor 
press, and its success is therefore a matter of 
congratulation on the part of its contempo- 
raries. 






Demand the union label on all products. 



tflrftw 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



THE CHURCH AND LABOR. 



The so-called rapprochement between the 
churches and organized labor has evidently 
begun to produce results. The Rev. Charles 
Stelzle, leader of the movement to bring these 
institutions together, is quoted by the Liter- 
ary Digest as having made the "rather sur- 
prising statement" that "organized labor is 
more hostile at present toward the Roman 
Catholic Church than toward the Protestant 
churches, by reason of the recent attitude on 
social questions taken by Rome." The sur- 
prising thing about this statement consists not 
in the statement itself, but in the making of 
it. On second thought, instead of being sur- 
prised, we should be reconciled by the fact that 
such statements are just what might have 
been expected under the circumstances. 
Doubtless we shall hear other such statements 
before the rapprochement between faith and 
works reaches its consummation. Touching 
the merits of Mr. Stelzle 's statement, it is 
made out of whole cloth, or at any rate, out 
of very inadequate materials — that is, from 
incomplete observation. The "attitude on so- 
cial questions taken by Rome" has no more 
effect upon organized labor in the United 
States than has the attitude on the weather 
taken by the Man in the Moon. It is the at- 
titude of the local clergyman toward the local 
trade-union that counts in the opinion of the 
latter. That opinion, we feel bound to say, is 
not being improved by the "Department of 
Church and Labor." Mr. Stelzle, the head of 
that institution, is a very worthy man, so far 
as we know, very ambitious to do good and 
particularly desirous of mixing the oil of 
churchianity with the water of trade-union- 
ism. Mr. Stelzle 's zeal is admirable, but his 
discretion is — well, it simply isn't. As long 
as men believe in Heaven as a good place for 
themselves and their friends, and in Hell as 
a good place for their enemies, the churches 
will always fill a "long-felt want," provided 
that, in kind and degree, their preachings keep 
pace with advancing thought on the subject of 
that which is desirable in the hereafter. But 
the churches' place in the "here" is not in the 
labor movement, but in their own movement, 
the religious movement. Any attempt to com- 
bine these movements is bound to fail, and in 
that failure both movements are bound to suf- 
fer. With all due respect to the churches, we 
warn the labor movement that no good can 
come to it from any movement that tends or 
attempts to combine religion and economics. 
Religion, economics and politics are separate 
and distinct institutions, and for their own 
good they must be kept apart. 



The Typographical unions throughout the 
country are making good progress toward the 
establishment of the eight-hour day in the 
printing trade. The International Typo- 
graphical Union announces that 240 local un- 
ions have already secured the eight-hour day 
or have entered into agreements under which 
the shorter workday will go into effect on Jan- 
uary 1. In all other cases the prospects are 
good for a speedy and complete victory. 
Another great craft converted to the principle 
of shorter hours of labor and longer hours of 
life! 



And now Ave learn that the Bengalis have 
adopted the boycott as a means of protesting 
against the conduct of the British Govern- 
ment. Here is an opportunity for Mr. Post 
to show these deluded people the wickedness 
of that un-Indian institution! 



The statement of Dr. D. K. Pearson, de- 
scribed as a "Chicago millionaire philanthro- 
pist," who said: "I would rather be John D. 
Rockefeller to-day, divested of his wealth and 
with his lovable personality, than any of the 
crew, saints or sinners, who are attacking 
him," reminds this sinner of the reply made 
by Thomas B. Reed to the Member of Con- 
gress who declared that he "would rather be 
right than be President." Dr. Pearson "can't 
be either"; that is to say, he can't be either 
Rockefeller or one of the crew. Dr. Pearson 
can be a toady, and that's all. 



There is no panacea for the so-called labor 
question, but the union label will cure most of 
the symptoms. Demand that emblem when 
making purchases in any line ! 



Look for the Garment Workers' label when 
purchasing ready-made clothing of all kinds. 
And beware of imitations! 



Friendly Comment. 

The Coast Seamen 's Journal, under the able edi- 
torial management of Walter Maearthur, has started 
on its nineteenth year. — San Francisco Call. 



The Coast Seamen 's Journal, one of the best 
labor papers on the Pacific Coast, celebrated its eight- 
eenth anniversary last week. This paper is published 
by the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. — Union Labor 
Journal, Bakersfield, Cal. 

The Coast Seamen 's Journal has entered its nine- 
teenth year with splendid vigor. Editor Maearthur 
and the Sailors ' Union have our congratulations. — 
Labor News, Eureka, Cal. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal has entered upon its 
nineteenth year. The Journal is one of the papers to 
which one looks with confidence in finding in its col- 
umns 'something substantial and worth while. — Sunday 
News, Sacramento, Cal. 



The Coast Seamen 's Journal, of San Francisco, 
has entered upon its nineteenth year. The Journal 
is one of the best labor papers published. Its particu- 
lar field is the improvement of the conditions of 
sailors, and it has done much for them.— Seattle 
(Wash.) Union Record. 

The Coast Seamen 's Journal finished its eight- 
eenth year as a journal last week. Editor Maearthur 
writes: "The Journal is growing old; as compared 
with the average life of similar publications, it is a 
veritable patriarch. ' ' These words are true, but they 
are true because the Journal has been worthy of sur- 
vival. It is one of the best-edited trade journals in 
the United States.— Gray 's Harbor (Wash.) Post. 



The Coast Seamen 's Journal has just entered up- 
on its nineteenth year. We do not exaggerate when 
we say that it is one of the ablest labor journals in 
the world, and seemingly one of the most prosperous. 
We congratulate Editor Maearthur, the members of 
the Coast Seamen's Union, and labor generally, for 
the good the Journal has done in the past, and wish 
it a career of equal usefulness in the future.— San 
Francisco Star. 



With tat week 's issue of the Coast Seamen 's 
Journal that estimable publication entered upon the 
nineteenth year of its valuable career. There is per- 
haps no labor paper in the United States that has lived 
longer and as prosperous, worked harder, and as ably 
defended and advocated the precepts of the organized 
wage-earners of the country. First of all, the Jour- 
nal has been devoted to the interests of the seamen, 
and after that it has been used to improve the great 
mass of "land lubbers", who need a stout heart and 
strong arm in the avenues of industrial reform ; and 
like old wine the Journal gets better each year. — 
Portland (Or.) Labor Press. 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' AS- 
SOCIATION OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters, New York, N. Y., Oct. 12, 1905. 
Shipping slack; prospects better. 

H. P. Griffin, Secretary. 
166 Christopher st. 



FISHERMEN'S PROTECTIVE UNION OF 
THE PACIFIC COAST AND ALASKA. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 13, 1905. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 8.00 p. m., 
Ed. Andersen presiding. I. N. Hylen and Andrew 
Brandt were elected delegates to the convention of the 
International Seamen's Union at Cleveland, O. Ed. 
Andersen, Andrew Brandt and I. N. Hylen were 
elected delegates to the Japanese and Korean Exclu- 
sion League. The Banking Committee was elected 
for the ensuing term. 

I. N. Hylen, Secretary. 

9 Mission at. 



* 


OFFICIAL. 


# 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 23, 1905. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 7:30 
p. m., E. Ellison in the chair. Secretary reported 
shipping fair. The following were declared elected 
delegates to the tenth annual convention of the Inter- 
national Seamen 's Union, to be held at Cleveland, O., 
December 4, 1905: A. Furuseth, P. B. Gill, VV. Mae- 
arthur, H. L. Petterson and Ed. Rosenberg. 

A. Furuseth, Secretary. 

S. W. cor. East and Mission sts. Tel. Main 5397. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 16, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium; pros- 
pects good. Men scarce. 

H. L. Petterson, Agent. 
3004 McCarver st. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 16, 1905. 
Shipping fair. 

P. B. Gill, Agent. 
1312 Western ave. P. O. Box 48. Tel. James 3031. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 16, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; prospects 
poor. 

Wm. Thorbeck, Agent. 
114 Quincy st. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 443. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 16, 1905. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

Wm. Gohl, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland (Or.) Agency, Oct. 17, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Situation unchanged. 

1). W. Paul, Agent. 
40 Union ave. Tel. Hood 352. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 16, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fair; prospects 
fair. 

C. Sorensen, Agent. 
222 C street. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 566. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 16, 1905. 
Shipping medium; prospects fair. 

Harry Ohlsen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 774. 



Honolulu (H. T.) Agency, Oct. 10, 1905. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

A. Coldin, Agent. 
Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts. P. O. Box 96. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' AS 
S0CIATI0N OF TH E PACIFIC. 

Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 19, 1905. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 7:30 
p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary reported 
shipping quiet. Balloting on election of delegates to 
the International Seamen 's Union convention, to be 
held at Cleveland, Ohio, was proceeded with. 

Eugene Steidle, Secretary. • 
54 Mission st. 



Seattle (Wash.) Agency, Oct. 12, 1905. 
No meeting. Shipping quiet. Sailing ship cooks 
scarce. 

W. Sorensen, Agent. 



San Pedro (Cal.) Agency, Oct. \2, 1905. 
Shipping quiet. Plenty of men ashore. 

G. Lloyd, Agent. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarteks, Chicago, 111., Oct., 16, 1905. 
Shipping fair; prospects good. 

Wm. Penje, Secretary. 
123 North Desplaines st. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS OF THE 
GREAT LAKES. 



Headquarters, Buffalo, N. V., Oct. 17, 1905. 
Situation unchanged. 

II. R. Walker, Secretary. 
55 Main st. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



EEADQUARTBRS, Boston, Mass., Oct. 17, L905. 
Shipping fair. 

Wm. H. Frazier, Secretary. 
IViA Lewis st. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION. 



Headquarters, Bb elyn, n. Y., Oct. 12, 1905. 

Shipping dull. General situation fair. 

Daniel Sullivan, Secretary. 
15 Union st. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



..;•:-.-;-< r T W • • • • 




On the Great Lakes. = 

(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 



; - ; - ; <?*fr<«><3><S><fr<3><3><3><»<3xg><^^ 




Seamen's Convention. 



On Monday, December 4. al Cleveland, 
Ohio, there will assemble in convention some 
of the brightest minds in the seamen's union 
movement, among these being delegates from 
the Sailors" Union of the Pacific, Pacific Coasl 
.Marine Firemen's Union, Fishermen's Union 
of the Pacific Coast and Alaska. Marine Cooks 
and Stewards of the Pacific, Bay and River 
Steamboatmen, Atlantic Coast Seamen's 
Union, Atlantic Coast Marine Firemen, Ma- 
rine Cooks and Stewards of the Atlantic, 
Fishermen's Union of the Atlantic. Inland 
Seamen's Union, Lake Seamen's Union and 
.Marine Cooks and Stewards of the Greal 
Lakes. 

During the convention an open meeting, at 
which all men in sympathy with organized la 
bor will be welcomed, will be held, and will be 
of special interest to the seamen of the Lakes, 
Every seaman on the Lakes in any capacity, 
should make it an object to he at this meeting. 
Among the speakers it is hoped will be Com- 
rades Furuseth, Macarthur, Rosenberg, And- 
ersen, Steidle and Harrington, of the Pacific 
Coast. Comrade Sullivan, of the Atlantic 
Firemen, and Comrade Frazier, of the Atlan- 
tic ('oast Se; d. The meeting will he worth 

every man's while. Let lis all he there and 
tender the same courteous treatment our dele- 
gates re ived from both Coasts. 

W. II. .1. 

( 'i nneaut. < ). 



Sale of Carferry. 



An order was made some time ago by Court 
Commissioner Hugh Ryan, of Milwaukee, re- 
straining Captain E. G. Crosby, president of 
the Grand Trunk Carferry line, a Milwaukee 
corporation, from selling the carferry Grand 
Haven, owned by that corporation. The boat 
is now advertised for sale at public auction. 
The injunction order has just been made pub- 
lic. It does not aim to prevent the public auc- 
tion sale of November 7, as that is to be made 
under foreclosure proceedings broughl by the 
Fidelity Trust Co. This company loaned 
tin' carferry corporation $175,000. 

It is understood that there are several cor- 
porations which want the boat, and if she 
shoidd leave the present Milwaukee-Grand 
Haven line the business of the Detroit. Grand 
Haven & Milwaukee Railway Co., which is the 
Wisconsin end of the Grand Trunk system, 
would lose a good deal of its freight business, 
now carried by the ferry. 

The Ann Arbor and the Pere Marquette 
road as well as the Grand Trunk system. 
would like to secure the boat, and the indica- 
tions are that, if the sale takes place, there 
will be some spirited bidding. The Grand 
Trunk system would hi- glad to forestall such 
public sale if it could, in order to secure the 
boat upon its own terms. The injunction, 
however, was to prevent a rumored previous 
sale. 



The wreck of the Canadian steamer Mel- 
bourne, burned in Murray Canal four weeks 
ago, has been sold to B. \V. Folger, of Toron- 
to. He will have the hulk raised in order to 
save the machinery. 



May Get Steel Ore Land. 



Ge< rge W. Perkins, chairman of the finance 
committee of the United States Steel Corpora* 
tion, is quoted in a dispatch from New York 
as saying that the question of taking over the 
(iieat Northern ore lands of the Mesaba range 
is again receiving consideration. It is expect- 
ed, the dispatch says, that the Great Northern 
officials, at a meeting to be held < Jctober 12, will 
ratify ; nfract now being prepared concern- 
ing the on' lands. Official announcement of 
the transaction is said to be prospective on 
that date. 

The basis of the proposed transfer of con- 
trol is not known, but it will include a tonnage 
contract of greal value to the Great Northern. 
It was tonnage that took the Greal Northern 

(>n to the Mesaba range, and the road has 
soughl the control of ore only for the purpose 
i f controlling the tonnage. 

The dispatch says that the deal will I 
a royalty basis, but it will certainly have some 
provisions regarding annual tonnage. It has 

been taken for granted for some time that the 
Steel Corporation would ultimately take over 
t hi' Hill ore lands, which arc estimated to con- 
tain ore in various amounts. 



Loss of the Roby. 

The barge George YV. Roby which recently 

went aground at the Limekiln Crossing, 
caught (ire and will be a total loss. The Roby 
was built at Lay City in 1889, and was origin- 
ally a steamer. W^v days of usefulness in that 
class being over, her engines were taken out 
last winter and placed in the new steamer F. 
L. Robbins. Since then she has been towed by 
the steamer Major, formerly the John Mitch- 
ell. At the time she grounded at the Lime- 
kilns, the Roby was upbound with a cargo of 
soft coal, and it is believed this will also be a 
total loss. The Roby is owned by W. EL Reck- 
er of Cleveland, and has an insurance valua- 
tion of $40,000. It is a singular coincidence 
that the loss of the Roby. a converted steamer, 
should have followed so closely the destruction 
by fire of the barge V. H. Ketchum on Lake 
Superior, which was also formerly a steam- 
boat. The Roby was insured for about $30,- 
000. The vessel was in good shape, as a 
large amount of repair work was done on her 
last winter when her machinery was taken out. 



If the present good weather continues so 
that work is not hindered, the first cargo of 
coal will go on the new Ilanna dock on Con- 
nor's I'oini between October 20 and the last 

of the month. Rapid progress has been made 

on the structure, especially during the recent 

past and there is now no doubt whatever that 
the half of the structure which it had been in- 
tended to finish Ibis winter will be in operation 

before the close of navigation. The coal 
pockets which will be in the center of the 
completed deck, but which are on the casl side 
of the half to be finished this season, are Gear- 
ing completion, and with the present force en- 
gaged on them there will be no difficulty in 
concluding the work on them in a short time. 
Tin 1 three unloading rigs are also about fin- 
ished, as is the towei' trestle, which carries 
them. 



LaKe Captain Dies. 



With the passing of Captain E. F. Moore, 

another old-time vessclman is <:one. Captain 
Moore was born in Harrison, Mich., seventy- 
nine years ago, and at the age of sixteen years 
began sailing. At twenty-one years he was 
master of the passenger steamer Albion, run- 
ning between Mt. Clemens and Detroit. He 
was afterward active in tu;_ r business and be- 
came an owner. Captain Moore won admira- 
tion in November. 1883, when he went out of 
Port Huron with the tug Torrent ic a raging 
snowstorm and gale and went up to the 
Georgian Hay region and rescued the schoon- 
er Merrimac. which had lost her masts and 
was al the mercy of a storm. No other cap- 
tain in the harbor would venture out, Baying 
it was sure death. Later Captain Moore sail- 
ed well-known passenger steamers out of De- 
troit. He had not sailed for about fifteen 
vears. He leaves a widow and daughter. 



Perhaps never in the history of Lake com- 
merce has the present situation regarding men 
on the Lakes been duplicated. At Conneaut 

Harbor for two days. October 12 and 13, ml 
a single able-seaman was shipped, and only two 
ordinary-seamen. There is a large surplus of 
men ashore at all Lake Erie ports, while at 

upper Lake ports there is a corresponding 
shortage. Especially is this true of Lake Su- 
perior ports, where it was almost impossible 
to gel able-seamen during the week just past. 
On October 14 two vessels came down the 
Lakes short of their wheelsmen, while at Lake 
Erie ports men are crowding the Seamen's 
halls and running the docks. By the way, 
this latter is something that should be stopped. 
The sooner we all stay in the halls and com- 
pel ships' officers to ship Us there, the sooner 
we will have the respect of those officers. 

W. 11. -I. 

Conneaut, 0. 



\V. II. Simpson. General Superintendent 
of the Northwestern Fuel Company, at Mil- 
waukee, has compiled the following figures re- 
lating to the coal supply in Milwaukee, with 
total Lake arrivals during the season of Lake 
navigation up to October 1. The total receipts 
of anthracite for the season up to October 
1 were 575,552 tons: of liit uininoiis. 1,139,713 

tons, making a grand total for the season of 
1,715,265 tons. During the year 314,092 more 
tons arrived there than in 1904, although the 
September arrivals showed a decrease. 



Captain J. C Hume, a retired captain, who 

sailed many boats on the Lakes in the early 
days, is dead at St. Catherine, aged seventy- 
six years, from the results of an accident while 
assisting in bringing in some corn stalks to his 
barn. He fell from the load, alighting on his 
head and fracturing his skull. 



John Carlson, of Eseanaba. a seaman on 

the steamer John W. dates, while covering 

the hatches recently, at Erie, lost his footing 
and fell into the hold, the hatch-cover falling 
on top of him. lie died from his injuries at 

Hamot Hospital. 






Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Marine Notes. 



Seventy-five men have been laid off at the 
St. Clair plant of the Great Lakes Engineer- 
ing works on account of lack of material. 
Within a month the entire force will be back 
at work, however. 

The steamer Western States made her last 
trip to Buffalo on October 20, and from that 
date until the close of navigation the East- 
ern States will cover the route, leaving De- 
troit every other day. 

One of the most important features of Lor- 
ain's new Life-Saving station will be an emer- 
gency apparatus which will be kept on a Lake 
Shore electric car for instant service. In this 
manner the Lorain crew will be able to pro- 
tect the Lake shore from Rocky River to San- 
dusky. It is expected that work will start in 
about three weeks on the construction of the 
building. 

The tug Walter Vail, operated by the Mil- 
waukee Wrecking Company, recently arrived 
at Alpena, Mich., for the purpose of recover- 
ing the cargo of the steamer Shaw, which went 
down off Sturgeon Point, twelve years ago. 
Earlier in the season the wreck was located 
by the tug Fisherman and four buoys attach- 
ed to it, but these have been carried away or 
stolen. If the wreck cannot be readily locat- 
ed again operations may be suspended until 
spring. On the Vail is W. G. Smith, inventor 
of the Smith diving bell. He was at Alpena 
in 1898 engaged on the wreck of the Pewabic, 
lost near the mouth of the bay in the '60s, 
with a cargo of copper. An accident to the 
diving bell which cost two lives stopped opera- 
tions. 

The body of a woman, yet unidentified, 
was found in the water near Gorgontua, on 
the north shore of Lake Superior, recently. 
The discovery was made by William Verveile 
from a canoe, and he being a justice of the 
peace, took charge of the body, which he sent 
to the Soo on the United States & Dominion 
Transportation Company's steamer Manitou. 
It is now awaiting identification, which would 
still be possible by anyone knowing deceased 
in life, as it is well preserved. Identification 
is very difficult, owing to the fact that the 
body when found had not a particle of cloth- 
ing or even finger rings upon it. It is that of 
a woman thirty-five or forty years of age, and 
five feet four inches in height. It is thought 
to be the cook from the barge, V. II. Ketehum, 
which sank in Lake Superior recently, not far 
from where the body was found. 

An answer has been filed in the Duluth 
Admiralty Court in the suit of John Morgan 
against the Pittsburg Steamship Company. 
This is the suit in which Morgan seeks to ob- 
tain $2,000 damages for an alleged brutal as- 
sault upon him on the steamer Matpa, of the 
Pittsburg line, at Two Harbors not long ago. 
He claims the mate of the steamer hit him 
with an ax and that Captain Geroux not only 
countenanced the act of the mate, but threat- 
ened the plaintiff with further dire happen- 
ings. The defendant company sets forth in 
its answer that Morgan appeared upon the 
boat at Two Harbors grossly intoxicated and 
repeatedly threatened the mate with bodily 
injury, and the mate, in fear of bodily harm, 
struck Morgan with an ax and thus subdued 
his perturbed spirit. The company claims it 
was in no way responsible for the act of the 
mate, as he struck Morgan as an individual 
and entirely outside of his duty as an officer 
of the ship. 



TONAWANDA LETTER LIST. 



Anderson, H. B. 
Andrasen, Nills S. 
Atcheson, Fred 
Brown, Clarence J. 
Bergorstrom, Oscar 
Baase, Paul 
Brown, Fred C. 
Bandon, Fred 
Brown, Joe 
Brinniers, Heer K. 
Carlsen, Carl 
Coburn, J. 
Cobb, James W. 
Cunningham, John 
Clare, Frank 
Conger, Joseph 
Champine, Tony 
Cattanach, Ralph 
Christensen, Chas. 
Curire, John 
Corran, F. 
Charlson, Karl A. 
Danielsson, J. 
Donaldson, Chas. B. 
Daugherty, James 
Drucks, Louis 
Engulson, J. M. 
Fjeldsgaard, Adolf 
Furtaw, Parker 
Farran, James 
Glanz, Edw., Jr. 
Gillgren, Peter 
Green, J. S. 
Gay, Harry B. 
Housen, Thergrlm 
Hansen, Martin 
Heeley, Edmond 
Hillman, J. R. 
Hansan, A. 
Hansen, Karl Otto 



Herring, S. A. 
Hillman, Henry 
Hanson, P. 
Jacobson, August 
Johnson, Joe 
Johanssan, Carl 
Karlsen, Karl A. 
Knudsen, H. 
Kozlaske, Michael 
Karlsson, G. P. 
Leeland, W .M. 
I.undgren, Victor 
Lafarge, John 
Labo, Peter 
Maese, Max 
Mathiasen, Oscar 
Magnassan, C. J. 
McGrath, R. 
McLawby, Ed. 
McDonald. Murdocic 
McLeod, Thos. 
McNamara, Michael 
Nicholson, Andrew 
Milsen, Nils. 
Nilsen, Welenius 
Pedersen, A. H. 
Palmatier, George 
Pederson, N. A. 
Omonsen, Tollak 
Rankin, Jac. W. 
Sullivan, S. P. 
Sarsen, Dick. 
Shannon. H. P. 
Stalls, William 
Sheldon, H. S. 
Tovatt, Frank 
Van Antyerp, Chas. 
Waters, Frank 
Young, James 



CONNEAUT LETTER LIST. 



Anderson, Robt. 
Badgley, Frank 
Boufford, Fred 
Corey, Donald D. 
Cromwell, Birdsey 
Dorekermann, Geo. 
Dahl, Ernest 
Fuller. Achil 
Hill, Harry 
Hughes, Jas. J. 
Isaacs, Freeman J. 
Ingman, Gust. 



Janes, E. G. 
McNeeley, Matt . 
Moriarity, Danl. 
Meyers, Chas. 
McGuire, J. J. 
Muskon, F. 
Parsons, C. H. 
Paulson, Hans 
Roberts, Harry 
Whitcomb, Harry M. 
Wadsworth, Frank 



DETROIT LETTER LIST. 



Whitcomb. Harry M. 

Hansen, Carl 

Easu, Al. 

A dead letter ad- 
dressed to Wm. G. 
Weber. 

Larsen, Crean 

McManus, Wm. 

Gallagher, J. C.-2 

Westover, Alex. 

Olsen, Waldmar-2 

Brown, W. H. J. 

Johnnieson, Hilne 

Thomas, James-2 



Wald, Frank 
Ayers, E. E. 
Anderson, Harold 
Nadu, N., Jr. 
Nicklson. Donald 
Roland, Frank M. 
Almand, Albert 
Doyle, Jos. 
Blakly, A. 
Johnson, Victor 
Farwell, Roy 
Lenard, L. 
Pehnssen, John 
Squrr, W. J. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lakes District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

121 and 123 North Desplaines Street, Chicago, 111. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 



BRANCHES. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 930 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, O ...87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, O ....171 East River Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1295. 

TOLEDO, 719 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 0981. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2702. 
AGENCIES. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1503. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone Peoples 4015. 

BAY CITY, MICH 919 North Water Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 94 Hamilton Street 

SUB-AGENCIES. 

MANITOWOC, WIS »...809 South Eighth Street 

ERIE, PA 107 East Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 

SANDUSKY, 1107 Adams Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 931 Military Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL.; DETROIT, MICH.; CLEVELAND, O. 



RELIEF 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Erie, Pa. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistel, Mich. 



STATIONS. 

Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich, 
Sheboygan, Mil h 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



"We Don 't Pa tronize. 

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 

Bread — McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo.; 
National Biscuit Company, Chicago, 111. 

Cigars — Carl Upman of New York City; Kerbs, 
Wertheim & Schiffer, of New York City; The Henry 
George and Tom Moore. 

Flour — Washburn, Crosby Milling Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn.; Kelley Milling Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City. 

Meats — Kingan Packing Company, of Indianapolis. 
Ind. i 

Pipes — Wm. Demuth & Co., New York. 

Tobacco — American and Continental Tobacco Com- 
panies. 



CLOTHING. 

Buttons — Davenport Pearl Button Company, Daven- 
port, Iowa; Krementz & Co., Newark, N. J. 

Clothing — N. Snellenberg & Co., Philadelphia, Pa ; 
Clothiers' Exchange, Rochester, N. Y.; Strawbridge 
& Clothier, Philadelphia, Pa.; Blauncr Bros., New 
York. 

Corsets — Chicago Corset Company. 

Gloves — J. H. Cownie Glove Co., Des Moines, Iowa; 
California Glove Co., Napa, Cal. 

Hats — J. B. Stetson Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. 
M. Knox Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Shirts and Collars — United Shirt and foliar Company 
Troy, N. Y.; Van Zandt, Jacobs & Co., Troy, N. Y . : 
Cluett, Peabody & Co., Troy, N. Y.; James R. 
Kaiser. New York City. 

Shoes — Harney Bros., Lynn, Mass.; J. E. Tilt Shoe 
Co., Chicago, 111. 

Suspenders— Russell Mfg. Co., Middletown, Conn. 

Textiles — Merrimae Manufacturing Company (printed 
goods), Lowell, Mass. 

Underwear — Oneita Knitting Mills, Utica, N. Y. 

Woolens — Hartford Carpet Co., Thompsonville, Conn.; 
J. Capps & Son, Jacksonville, 111. 



PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS. 

Bookbinders — Geo. M. Hill Co., Chicago, 111.; Boorum 
& Pease Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Newspapers — Philadelphia Democrat, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Hudson, Kimberly & Co., printers, of Kansas 
City, Mo.; W. B. Conkey Co., publishers, Hammond, 
Ind.; Gazette, Terre Haute, Ind.; Times, Los An- 

POTTERY, GLASS, STONE, AND CEMENT. 

Pottery and Brick — J. B. Owens Pottery Co. of Zanes- 
ville, Ohio; Northwestern Terra Cotta Co., of Chi- 
cago, 111.; C. W- Stine Pottery Co., White Cottage, 
Ohio; Harbison-Walker Refractory Co., Pittsburg, 
Pa.; Utica Hydraulic Cement and Utica Cement 
Mfg. Co., Utica, 111. 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING. 

Carriage and Wagon Builders — S. R. Bailey & Co., 
Amesbury, Mass.; Hassett & Hodge, Amesbury, 
Mass.; Carr, Prescott & Co., Amesbury, Mass. 

General Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark, /Etna 
Company, New Britain, Conn.; Iver Johnson Arms 
Company, Fitchburg, Mass.; Kelsey Furnace Com- 
pany, Syracuse, N. Y. ; Brown & Sharpe Tool Com- 
pany, Providence, R. I.; John Russell Cutlery Com- 
pany, Turner's Falls, Mass.; Atlas Tack Company, 
Fairhaven, Mass.; Henry Disston & Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa.; American Hardware Co. (Russell & Er- 
win Co. and P. & F. Corbin Co.), New Britain, Conn.; 
Merritt & Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Iron and Steel — Illinois Iron and Bolt Company, of 
Carpentersville, 111.; Carborundum Company, Niag- 
ara Falls, N. Y. ; Casey & Hedges, Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; Gurney Foundry Company, Toronto, Ont.; 
Sattley Manufacturing Company, Springfield, Ohio; 
Page Needle Company, Franklin, N. H. ; American 
Circular Loom Company, New Orange, N. J.; Payne 
Engine Company, Elmira, N. Y. ; Lincoln Iron Works 
(F. R. Patch Manufacturing Company), Rutland, 
Vt. ; Art Metal Construction Company, Jamestown, 
N. Y. ; Erie City Iron Works, Erie, Pa.; David May- 
dole Hammer Co., Norwich, N. Y. ; Singer Sewing 
Machine Company, Elizabeth, N. J.; National Ele- 
vator and Machine Company, Honesdale, Pa.; Pitts- 
burg Expanded Metal Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Iron, Architectural — Geo. L. Meskir, Evansville, Ind. 

Stoves — Germer Stove Company, Erie, Pa.; "Radiant 
Home" Stoves, Ranges and Hot Air Blast, Erie, Pa.; 
Wrought Iron Range Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
WOOD AND FURNITURE. 

Bags — Gulf Bag Company, New Orleans, La., branch 
Bemis Bros., St. Louis, Mo. 

Baskets — Williams Manufacturing Company, North- 
ampton, Mass. 

Brooms and Dusters — The Lee Broom and Duster 
Company, of Davenport, Iowa; M. Goeller's Sons, 
Circleville, Ohio; Merkle-Wiley Broom Co., Paris, 
Illinois. 

Carriages — Crane, Breed & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Cooperage — Northwestern Cooperage and Lumber 
Company (otherwise known as the Buckeye Stave 
Company), of Ohio, Michigan, and Wisconsin; Elgin 
Butter Tub Company, Elgin, 111.; Williams Cooper- 
age Company and Palmer Manufacturing Company, 
of Poplar Bluff, Mo. 

China, — Wick China Company, Kittanning, Pa. 

Furniture — American Billiard Table Company, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio; Brumby Chair Company, Marietta. Ga.; 
O. Wisnc-r Piano Company, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Krell 
Piano Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; N. Drucker & Co., 
Cincinnati, Ohio, trunks; St. Johns Table Company, 
St. Johns, Mich.; Grand Rapids Furniture Manufac- 
turing Association, Grand Rapids, Mich.; Derby 
Desk Co., Boston, Mass. 

Gold Leaf — W. H. Kemp Company, New York, N. Y. ; 
Andrew Reeves, Chicago, 111.; George Reeves, Cape 
May, N. J.; Hastings Company, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Henry Ayers, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lumber — Trinity County Lumber Company, Grove- 
ton, Texas; Reinle Bros. <fe Solomon. Baltimore, 
Md.; Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company, 
Morehouse, Mo.; Union Lumber Company, Fort 
Bragg, Cal. 

Leather — Kullman, Salz & Co., Benicia, Cal.; A. B. 
Patrick & Co., San Francisco. Cal.; Columbus Buggy 
and Harness Company, Columbus, Ohio; Lerch 
Bros., Baltimore, Md. 

Rubber — Kokomo Rubber Company, Kokomo, Tnd : B. 
F. Goodrich Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio; Dia- 
mond Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Paper Boxes — E. N. Rowell & Co., Batavia, N. Y. ; J. 
N. Roberts & Co., Metropolis, 111. 

Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Co., Norfolk, N. Y.; 
Potter Wall Paper Co., Hoboken, N. J. 

Typewriters — Underwood Typewriter Company, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Watches — Keystone Watch Case Company, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Crescent Courvolseer Wilcox Com- 
pany; Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Company, 
Sag Harbor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Advertising Novelties — Novelty Advertising Com- 

pany, Coshocton, Ohio. 
Burlap — H. B. Wiggins' Sons' Company, Bloomfield, 

N. J. 
Bill Pasters — Bryan & Co., Cleveland. Ohio. 
Railways — Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad; 

Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. 
Telegraphy — Western Union Telegraph Company, and 

its Messenger Service. 
D. M. Parrv, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Wiilman, Osborne & Co., Lynn, Mass.; Thomas Taylor 

X- Son. Hudson, Mass. 
C. W. Post, Manufacturer of Grape Nuts and Postum 

Cereal, Battle Creek, Mich. 
Lehmaier-Swartz & Co., New York City. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



On the Atlantic Coast. 



(Continued from page 3.) 



bad and insufficient food is assigned as the 
cause. Even after making due allowance for 
the proverbial proneness of seamen to 
"prowl," it would seem that where there is so 
much smoke there must be some fire. An in- 
vestigation of the subject by the Navy De- 
partment would undoubtedly be the besl 
means to lay the whole trouble on the scrap- 
heap of has-been things. If the seamen have 
no reasonable cause or causes for deserting 
from the Navy this unreasonableness should 
be laid bare before the public, whose peace of 
mind is being continually disturbed by these 
unofficial arraignments of the service which 
persist in cropping up in the press. On the 
other hand, if the seamen of the Navy have 
a just cause or causes for deserting, it is the 
plain duty of the Government to look into the 
grievances of the men, and as far as possible 
rectify whatever may be the matter. If the 
cause is, as the seamen claim, bad and insuffi- 
cient food, the remedy ought to be quite ap- 
parent and easy to a rich government like 
ours. If Secretary Bonaparte can not find 
time to look into the matter, perhaps Presi- 
dent Roosevelt might be induced to do so after 
he gets through with the important task of 
eliminating brutality from football. Action 
of some kind and by some one seems to be 
needed badly, if our Navy is to be saved from 
the fate of our merchant marine, a service to 
be shunned by self-respecting men and boys. 



The greatest danger to constitutional lib- 
erty lies in the gradual accumulation of arbi- 
trary ridings, each forming a precedent for 
the next, which the courts of the country are 
insidiously substituting for the powers con- 
ferred upon them by the Constitution. If 
President Roosevelt were all that his warmest 
admirers say he is, he would yet be open to 
the accusation of having violated the Consti- 
tution more than any other President has 
done. With such an illustrious example of 
wrongdoing before them, it is small wonder 
that the Judiciary is weakening in its adher- 
ence to Constitutional limitations and pro- 
cedures. The saddest and most dangerous 
feature of this insidious undermining of our 
Constitutional safeguards is its stealthiness, 
which hides its sinister potentialities from the 
great busy mass of the people. The remedy, 
however, is very simple. The people must, 
through the Initiative and Referendum, re- 
tain the supreme power of government in 
their own hands. That is the only way in 
which democracy can be preserved, which is 
but another way of saying that it is the only 
way in which our civilization can be advanced. 



Judge F. A. Smith, of Chicago, who recent- 
ly declared that "there is no such thing as 
peaceful, polite and gentlemanly picketing, 
any more than there can be chaste, polite and 
gentlemanly vulgarity, or peaceful mobbing, 
or lawful lynching," was distinctly fore- 
shadowed by Job, when he asked: ""Who is 
this that darkeneth counsel by words without 
knowledge?" A more senseless, misleading or 
incongruous collocation of terms than that de- 
vised by Judse Smith could not have been 
chosen had the selection been made by open- 
ing a dictionary at random and picking the 
first word that met the eye. Is there a sane 
man in America, who can perceive sufficient 
affinity between picketing, vulgarity, mob- 



bing, etc., to warrant him in placing them in 
the same category for purposes of illustra- 
tion 1 If there is. let him speak up now. or 
forever after bold bis peace. As for Judge 
Smith, he is evidently intellectually in the 
same boat witli the distinguished collegian, 
whose tongue inadvertently betrayed to the 
world that in his mind a scab was somehow 
ass< eiated with a hero. 



Fag Ends. 



Sueccss sanctions everything! 



Affliction tries the heart, fortune the head. 



Democracy and civilization must rise or fall 
together. 



Work for the Initiative and Referendum 
and tlie Recall ! 



The pride that scorns to owe a debt is sadly 

Heeded ill lllis ai!e. 



Wisdom is simply the capacity to hold fast 
that which is good. 



The best laid plans of mice and men usually 
leave the lawyers but a choice of evils. 



Nothing is so obtusely dense as the mental 
brightness that never introspects itself. 



The truth is never "discovered,"' but only 
liberated from its hiding-place. 



It is much more difficult to instruct and im- 
prove men than to humbug and debase them. 



'•There is nothing new under the sun," in 
essence; but in form everything is being con- 
stantly renewed. 



Where resistance to legalized injustice is a 
moral issue, obedience to government morally 

ceases to be a civic duty. 



Power without responsibility is always dan- 
gerous, for no man or set of men are wise or 
cood at all tines. 



A good cause is never so much in danger 
from the machinations of its enemies as from 
the indiscreet zeal of its friends. 



Revolutions are psychological storms; and 
even as the sea is always rough and dangerous 
long after the storm has died away, so a peo- 
ple in revolt will be dangerous to organized 
society and government long after the causes 
of the revolt have been removed. 



The many schisms in religion and politics 
are really symptoms of human progress; for 
did we all think alike on these subjects, what 
with the known infirmities of human nature, 
it is much more likely that we would all be 
wrong in our beliefs than that we would all be 
right 



A writer in the London Times is alarmed at 
England's lack of maritime prestige in the 
Atlantic. He calls attention to the tonnage 
of the German lines, particularly those of 
Hamburg and Bremen, cites the fact that they 
have large, fast ships in course of construc- 
tion, but that no one of them are turbines. 
He intimates a doubt as to whether the turbine 
is to be on the ocean in shape of a ship pro- 
peller what it is in the office of the draftsman 
or engineer. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with the 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 






N. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer. 
lMsA Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, MASS., 1%A Lewis St. 

BANGOR. ME., 211 Broad St.' 

PORTLAND, ME., 377A Fore St. 

NEW BEDFORD. MASS.. 7 South Water St. 

PROVIDENCE. R. I., 464 South Main St. 

NEW YORK. N. Y., 51-52 South St. 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 68 West St. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., 129 Walnut St. 

BALTIMORE. MD.. 604 East Pratt St. 

NORFOLK, VA„ 228 Water St. 

MOBILE. ALA., 104 Commerce St. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA., 937 Tchoupltoulas St. 

BRUNSWICK, GA. 






ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N .Y., 16 Union St. 
Branches: 

BOSTON. MASS.. 284 Commercial St. 
JERSEY CITY. N. J.. 35 Hudson St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, MD., 1736 Thames St. 
NORFOLK. VA.. S9 Church St. 
NEWPORT NEWS, VA„ 2314 Washington Ave. 
MOBILF. AT. A., 104 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA.. 937 Tchoupltoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 16G Christopher St. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 
Headquarters : 
BOSTON, MASS.. Commercial Wharf. 
Branch: 

GLOUCESTER, MASS., 141% Main St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, ILL., 121-123 North Desplalnes St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, WIS., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 56 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR. O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND. O.. 171 East River St. 
TOLEDO, O.. 719 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y.. 152 Main St. 
DETROIT. MICH, 7 Woodbridge St.. East. 
SUPERIOR. WIS., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, WIS., 515 East Second St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY. MICH., 919 North Water St. 
MANITOWOC. WIS.. 809 South Eighth St. 
ERIE. PA., 107 East Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL. 9142 Mackinaw St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O.. 992 Day St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 1107 Adams St 
PORT HURON, MICH.. 931 Military St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 
BUFFALO. N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, MICH, 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO. O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, MICH., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., Tel. 305. 
CLEVELAND, O., Atwater Bldg.. Room 1. 
i'IIICAGO. ILL. 42 Wells St. Tel. Main 3637. 
MILWAUKEE, WIS.. 317 Florida St. 

Sub-Agrency: 
CONNEAUT, O., 981 Day St. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, Southwest corner East 
and Mission Sts. 

Branches : 
TACOMA, WASH., 3004 McCarver St. 
SEATTLE, WASH, 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH, 114 Quincy St. 
ABERDEEN, WASH., P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND, OR., 40 Union Ave. 
EUREKA. CAL, P. O. Box 327. 
SAN PEDRO .CAL., P. O. Box 2380. 
HONOLULU, H. T., P. O. Box 96. 

PACIFIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S ONION. 

Headquarters : 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 46 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, WASH., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 54 Mission St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. WASH., Colman Dock, Room 9. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL., P. O. Box 2155. 



FISHERMEN'S PROTECTIVE UNION OF 
PACIFIC COAST AND ALASKA. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 9 Mission St. 

SEATTLE, WASH, P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, OR, P. O. Box 183. 



THE 



BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 54 Mission St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, CAL, 200 M St. 



THE COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALIA 

39 Erskine Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



List of Union Offices 

ALLIED PRINTING TRADES 

COUNCIL 

Of San Francisco, Cal. 



Abbott, F. H., 314-316 Battery. 

Altvater Printing Co., 2593-2595 Mission. 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

Art Printery, The, 41-43 Eighth. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery. 

Barry, James H,. The Star Press, 429 
Montgomery. 

Belcher & Phillips, 508 Clay. 

Ben Franklin Press, 123 Seventh. 

Bensen & Liss, 776 Bryant. 

Berry Bros., 320 Sansome. 

Bickell, L. A., 19 First. 

Black Cat Press, 402 McAllister. 

Boulin-Leichner Co., 519 Filbert. 

Brown, Andrew, Printing Co., First and 
Mission. 

Brunt, W. N. Co., 102-104 Second. 

Budde, H. P., Cal. Press, 407 y 2 Turk. 

Caldwell, J. E., 526 Montgomery. 

Clayburgh, Leilich & Schneider, City 
Hall Square. 

Church Press, 23 Davis. 

Collins, C. J., 16 Hayes. 

Cook, The Morton L,., 144 Second. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Cubery & Co., 587 Mission. 

Danish Printing Co., 410 Kearny. 

Daily Racing News, 21-23 First. 

Day & McClinton, 538 Sacramento. 

Drake & Baker, 850 Market. 

Drum Bros., 638 Mission. 

Eagle Printing Co., The, 344 Kearny. 

Eastman, Frank & Co., 509 Clay. 

Eastman & Mitchell, 28 First. 

Fording & Halle, 22 Clay. 

Francis-Valentine Co., 5 Anna Lane, off 
Eddy. 

Gabriel Printing Co., 320 Sansome. 

Galloway Publishing Co., 146 Second. 

Gilmartin Publishing Co.. The. 19 First. 

Guedet Printing Co., 935 Market. 

Golden State Printing Co., 73 Third. 

Golden West Press, 146 Second. 

Hancock Bros., 809 Mission. 

Harvey, John D., 509 Clay. 

Haydn Printing Co., 417 Montgomery. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

Hiester, Wm. A., 529 California. 

Hughes, E. C. & Co., 511 Sansome. 

Illinois-Pacific Glass Works, 10-16 Main. 

Jalumstein Printing Co., 310 Hayes. 

Knarston Printing Co., 529 Washington. 

Lafontaln, J. R., 535 California. 

Latham & Emanuel, 511 Sacramento. 

Leader, The, 532 Commercial. 

Levingston. L., 540 Clay. 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

Luce & Her Co., 406 Sansome. 

Lynch, James T., 514 Kearny. 

Lyon, W. T. & Co., 161 First. 

Majestic Press, The, 314 Eighth. 

McCracken Printing Co., 509 Kearny. 

Medina & Co., 221 Sacramento. 

Meyerfeld, Alfred M., 414 Pine. 

Monahan, John & Co., 412 Commercial. 

Moore-Hinds Co., 28 First. 

Morris & Bain, 108 Market. 

Murdock, C. A. & Co., 532 Clay. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clav. 

Nevin, C. W. & Co., 532 Commercial. 

Occidental Mystic Press, 6 Cottage Row. 

Pacific Goldsmith Publishing Co., 146 
Second. 

Partridge, John, 306 California. 

Pernau Bros., 543 Clay. 

Phelan, F. M., Ill Cook. 

Phillips & Van Orden, 508 Clay. 

Police Bulletin of San Francisco, Hall 
of Justice. 

Polyglott Press, 628 Montgomery. 

Recorder Publishing Co., 516 Commer- 
cial. 

Roesch, Louis Co., 321-25 Sansome. 

Rooney, J. V. Co., 1308 Mission. 

Samuel, Wm., 411% California. 

San Francisco Newspaper Union, 405-407 
Sansome. 

Schreiber, P. H, 809 Mission. 

Shanly, J. M., 414 Clay. 

Smyth, Owen H, 511 Sacramento. 

Spaulding, Geo. & Co.. 414 Clay. 

Springer & Co., 240 Ellis. 

Stanley-Taylor Co., 656 Missio n. 

Standard Printing Co., 51 SClav. 

Sterett Co., W. I., 933 Market. 

Sterling Press, 229 Stevenson. 

Stuetzel & Co., 144 Second. 

Sunset Press., 1327 Market. 

Sutter Press, The, 240 Stockton. 

Tomoye Press, 144 Union Square av. 

Town Talk Printing Co., 146 Second. 

Turner, H. S., 3232 Mission. 

Valleau & Peterson. 410 Sansome. 

Wale Printing Co., 621 Clay. 

Werner, Geo. A., 1067 Howard. 

Western Fine Arts Co., 529 Clay. 

Williams, Joseph, 142 Sevents. 

Wilson, Geo. F., 405 Front. 

Winkler, Chas. W., 146 Second. 

Winterburn, Jos., 417 Clay. 

Woodward, W. A. & Co.. 12 Sutter. 
BOOKBINDERS. 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

Brown & Power Co., 508 Clay. 

Buswell & Co., 536 Clay. 

California Bookbinding and Printing Co., 
28 First. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

McGreeney, Wm. H, 23 Stevenson. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

Kitchen, Jr., Co., 510-514 Commercial. 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

Mclntyre, J. B., 424 Sansome. 

Malloye. F., 422 Sacramento. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Phillips Bros., 505 Clay. 

Rotermundt, Hugo L., 413 Sacraemnto. 

Webster, Fred. L., 19 First. 

Whelan, Richard I. & Co., 42 Steuart. 

San Francisco Mailing Co., 609 Mission, 
5th Floor. 

PHOTO-ENGRAVERS AND ETCHERS. 

Barnhart & Swasey. 107 New Montgom- 
ery. 

Bolton & Strong, 621 Clay. 

California Engraving Co., 506 Market. 

San Francisco Etching Co., 109 New 
Montgomery. 

McCabe & Sons, 611 Merchant. 

Sierra Engraving Co., 324 Grant av. 

Sunset Engraving Co., 108 Union Square 
av. 

Union Engraving Co., 144 Union Square 
av. 

Yosemite Engraving Co., 24 Montgom'y. 

ELECTROTYPERS AND STEREOTYP- 
ERS. 

American Press Association, 19 First. 

Hoffschneider Bros.. 412 Commercial. 

Martin & Co., 508 Clay. 




hen 



VALUE, of 




DtlTANDTIit BRAND 



SCANDINAVIAN AMERICAN SAVINGS BANK 

Cor. Bush and Montgomery Sts. (Mills Building-) 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Capital, $300,000. Total Assets, $1,000,000 

Directors Advisory Board 

Charles Nelson Martin Sanders E. W. Ferguson J. Jensen 

Lewis I. Cowgill W. H. Little Fr. C. Siebe A. T. Dunbar 

J. C. Eschen Henry Wilson Mikal Olsen J. C. Everding 

Geo. H. Tyson S. D. Denson, Attorney 

Saving Accounts Solicited. Commercial deposits subject to check. Inter- 
est paid on savings and commercial balances, and allowed from date of de- 
posit. Drafts, Telegraphic Exchange and Letters of Credit issued, payable 
in New York, London, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and all the prin- 
cipal cities of Europe and America. Open Saturday evenings from 6:30 to 8, 
for deposits. 




Notice! Notice! 
REMOVED 

THE UNITED STATES 
WATCH CLUB 

9 SPEAR ST., Buckley Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



E^. FT. COI^LIIVS 

Merchant Tailor 

REMOVED TO 

9 Spear Street, Buckley Bldg. 

PHONE MONTGOMERY 1242 

SAN FRANCISCO 




The Scandinavian 
Sailors' Home 

Cor. Drumm and Commercial Sts. 

Telephone James 4846. 

A new building erected especially for sail- 
ors. Latest improvements, clean and light 
rooms, bath, reading and dining rooms. 
First-class board and lodging at reasonable 
rates. Gospel service — Sundays, 8:46 p. m., 
and Wednesdays, 8 o'clock p. in. All wel- 



. ome. 



A. ANDERSON 

Missionary and Manager. 



General News. 



The Chinese Minister has received in- 
structions from the Emperor to investi- 
gate and report on the local systems for 
electrical lighting, telegraph and tele- 
phone communication. 

Prank S. Komp, of Chicago, the for- 
mer president of the Kenosha (Wis.) 
State Bank, convicted of perjury, has 
been sentenced to two years at hard labor 
in the State prison. 

The War Department has awarded con- 
tracts for all the material required for 
the installation of an elaborate wireless 
telegraph system in the southern part of 
the Philippine Islands. 

The Lynn county (la.) Grand Jury 
has returned three indictments against 
the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific 
Railroad, for alleged discrimination in 
passenger rates. 

The French Parliament will be asked 
to offer a $200,000 prize for a cure of 
consumption. The project has the ap- 
proval of the Government and therefore 
its adoption is assured. 

The elections of the Russian Nation- 
al Assembly will commence November 
12. On account of the indirect system 
adopted the election will cover a period 
of from ten days to two weeks. 

The Governor of the Dutch East 
Indies has reported that the troops have 
attacked the rebels in the Gova country. 
Fifty natives were killed. The Dutch 
troops lost seven men killed. 

It is said that the Canadian side of 
Niagra Falls has receeded 300 feet dur- 
ing the last eighty years, and an investi- 
gation will be made by the International 
Waterways Commission. 

It is said that owing to President 
Roosevelt's opposition to his Cabinet 
officers mixing in general politics, the 
members of his official family will con- 
fine their speeches to places in their own 
States. 

The American Humane Association, re- 
cently in convention at Philadelphia, Pa., 
rejected a resolution offered by Miss 
Hall, of Cincinnati, advocating a na- 
tional law authorizing administration of 
anesthetics to those dying in agony. 

At the conclusion of a week 's trial 
District Judge Good of Auburn, Neb., 
has sustained a motion to dismiss the 
charge against Charles M. Chamberlain, 
accused of wrecking the Chamberlain 
Bank of Tecumseh. The specific charge 
was embezzlement. 

The announcement ha3 just been made 
that the formal opening of the Simplon 
tunnel will have to be again postponed 
until next spring. It appears that the 
boring of the parallel gallery cannot be 
proceeded with as fast as was ex- 
pected because of about 1500 feet of 
crumbling rock found near the Italian 
entrance. 

The famous fair of Niji-Novgorod, in 
Russia, which has just ended, has proved 
this year a greater failure than in many 
years past. It is said that the develop- 
ment of railroads in Russia and the 
adoption on a larger scale of modern 
business methodsare causes of the dimin- 
ution of the volume of business transact- 
ed at the fair. Many Moscow merchants 
no longer send goods and products to 1 lie 
once famous fair. 

President Roosevelt, through the State 
Department, has issued an order con- 
cerning examinations (or the Civil Ser 
vice. The order reads as follows: "No 
officer or employo of the Government 
shall directly or indirectly instruct, or be 
concerned in any manner in the instruc- 
tion of, any person or classes of persona 
with a view to their special preparation 
for the examination of the United Stales 
Civil Service Commission. The fact that 
any officer or employe is found so en- 
gaged sliall be considered sufficient cause 
for his removal from the service." 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Worhers. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



The New /.calami Department of Agri- 
culture has appointed two women as 
dairy inspectors. 

The engineers on the Moscow ami St. 
sburg Railroad struck on October 
20. Railroad employes have issued a call 
for a general strike. 

The doctors in the hospitals at Bor- 
deaux, France, who struck on October 7, 
resumed their duties on the 16th, the di- 
rectorates of the institution having 
granted the demands. 

The strike of the electrical workers in 
Berlin, Germany, is ended. At a confer- 
ence on October 14 the delegates of the 
workingmen voted to accept the associ- 
ated companies' original offer of 5 per 
cent, increase in wages. 

Over a thousand farm laborers made 
desperate by famine, invaded a market 
place at Kcija, forty-eight miles from 
Seville, Spain, recently, seized the entire 
stock of goods and money, destroyed the 
market and threw the town into a panic. 
The authorities hastily applied for mili- 
tary relief. 

The employes of the Moscow and Kaz- 
an Railroad struck on October 20 and 
traffic on the road is interrupted. 'I'll.' 
strikers induced a stoppage of work on 
the Yaroslav and Archangel Railroad 
and attempted to hold a meeting in the 
streets, but were dispersed by Cossacks 
and police. 

The Governor of Odessa on October - (l 
issued an order to the police instructing 
them that in the event of disturbances 
they are to fire directly into the mobs 
without any preliminary volleys in the 
air. This order, it is stated, will have a 
deterrent effect on proposed gatherings 
for the purpose of disorder. 

Recent unjustifiable and uncalled-for 
wage-reducing awards by the West Aus- 
tralian Arbitration Court have thorough- 
ly disgusted the workers in that State, 
who have lost all confidence in that body 
as at present constituted. In union cir- 
cles the Court is universally regarded as 
' ' the weapon in the hands of employers. ' ' 

The weavers in four mills at Cora, 
Germany, having refused to withdraw 
notice of an intention to strike, the ASSO 
ciation of Mill Owners declared a gen- 
eral shut-down of their factories on Oc- 
tober 15. This action has thrown 20,000 
persons out of employment, and it is ex- 
pected to lead to lockouts in a number of 
other Thuringian and Saxon towns. 

The general conditions in connection 
with Xew South Wales Works Depart- 
ment contract's provide for union rates of 
pay as follows: Bricklayers, lis. per 
day; masons. Is. 4' L .d. per hour (44 
hours per week) ; quarrymen, 8s. per day; 
crane-men, 9s. per day; bricklayers' la- 
borers, 9s. pel day; laborers (pick and 
shovel), 7s. per day; tool sharpeners 
(blacksmiths), Is. 3d. per hour. 

Notwithstanding the furnishing by 
the Government of a number of rurales 
to act as guards on the engines of the 
Mexican Central for the protection of 
any firemen that the company might 
secure, the officials have not yet suc- 
ceeded in resuming traffic. The State 
authorities have taken the matter in 
hand and have given the firemen three 
days in which to decide to return to 
work or get out of the city. 

The "hunger strike," which began on 
October 2 in the women 's department of 
one of the large prisons at St.. Peters- 
burg, Russia, devoted to the detention of 
political offenders, has become general. 
For three days all the inmates of the 
prison have been refusing to eat as a 
protest against the rough treatment of 
a female prisoner and the general ad- 
ministrative conditions in the prison. 
The prisoners are mainly Socialists, 
many of whom were arrested recently. 



Letters are advertised for six months 
and kept at the Sailors' Union Office for 
twelve months, all told. If not called 
for at the expiration of one year letters 
will be returned to the Postoffice. 



Aamodt, T. P. 
.i;iss, T. A. 
Abrahamsen, A. 
Addicks, II. 
Adolf. C. 
Allmers, !•'. 
Amundsen, Pet. 
Ainundsen-1014 
Amundsen. Can 
Amundsson, M. 
Andersen-1 009 
Andersen, El 
Andersen- 1 -'■','• 
Andersen. Sigurd 
Andersen, Eskil 
Andersen-1 1 13 
Baardsen. Ed. 
Baggot, R. ii- 
Baldwin, E. 
Barber, a. 

erg, 11 M. 
Bayerle, Rupert 
. .ecker, !• . -d \\ . 
Bennett, N. M. 
Bechler, J. 
Benson, Ben 
Bergh, A. 

ilm, Edw. 

gren, W. 
Eerggvest. Emil 
Bernard, Sandallo 
Berner, Oliver 
Berthelsen. Alf 
i iickrem, < daus 
Carlsen, Hans 
i larlson, am-i Gu. 
( arlson, C. \v. 
Carlsson- 1 19 
( arriek, Jos. B. 

Chandler, I 
Clievis. Frank 
liahlgren, Oscar 
1 anielsen, I 'an 
lianielson. Ernst 
l a rlis, I [arold 
IJegn, Paul 
De Groot. J. 
Eck, Nicolas 
E genes, Nils 

119 
Ekendahl, Carl 
Lklund, Ellis 
Kliassen, .1. A. 
Eliassen. Ed. 
lilingsen, P. 
Knlund, O. Vi . 
Kagerlund, G. E. 
Fahlesen, Emil 
Fernandes-527 
Forssell, Frans 
l'orsstrom-997 
Gasman, G. A. 
Gibbs, G. W. 
Gilholm, A. 
Gent-561 

Gibbs, Harry D. 
Giessler, !•". 
Gottschalk, Max 
Grahn. C, 
Gronberg, Erik 
Haglund, E. M. 
Hakansson, Fred 
Halvorsen, 11. 
Halvorsen. J. 
Hallberg. Herman 
Hammarin. C. P. 
Hansen-l.ti" 
Hansen, Alf. 
Hansen, Hans R. 
Hansen-1229 
Hansen, H. C. 
Hansen, Fred S. 
Hansen-1567 
Hansen-Edwart 
Hansen-1464 
Hansen. Laurits A. 
Ingebretsen, J. A. 
Ingebretsen, C. J. 
Isakson, G. E. 
Jansen, Henry 
.laiisson-1 23 I 
Jensen-1298 
Jensen, O. 
Jensen-1-79 
Jensen, Jens B. 
Jepsen, Antoni 
Jensen, Peter 

.Jensen.. II. !•'. 
Jensen, Hans J. 
Johanesen, M. 
Johanesen-1428 
Johanesen. John 

-Sell- 1 III 1 

Johansen-1 591 

Johansen-725 
Kahlbetzer, F. 
Kandela, E. 
Karelsen-270 
Karlsen. J. A. 
Karlstrom, J. R. 
Kask, John 
Kearon, Wm. 
Kera, A. 
Kerche, August 
Klemettlla-567 
Klosson, Chas. 
Kolbe, i.e.) 
Kolderup-423 
Kolstad, J. A. 
Koop. John 
Korthe, W. 
Laitone, Wiktor 
Lajord, E. Peder- 

sen 
Lamson, Thomas 
Larsen, Christian 
Larsen, Herman 
Larsen-613 
Larsen, Martin 
Larsen-1 202 
Larson. Lars -M. 
Larssen, M. 
Larsson, Idorth 
Larsson, Anton 
Lauren. J. O. 
Laurenson. Hugh 
Laws. Harry 
Leander, P. 
Leg8en-1091 
Leithoff, Carl 
Lelneweber, J. 
Madsen, P. J. 
Mardison. A. 
Martin. Albert 
Matusewltsch, J. 
Matthews. J. 
Man. L. 
Maule, G. 
Mavor. .las. T. 
McCarthy-! 332 



Andersen-1 1 9] 
Andersen- 1 -T:i 
Anderson-604 
Anderson. Adolf 
Anderson. Thomas 

mi. Ed, A. 
Anderson .Andrew 
Anderson-197 
,\ ndersson-1 1 1 
Andersson, Oskar 
Andersson-1060 
Andersson-l-." 1 

All'. el SSOIl-1 Jl 8 

Aiiiiii'isen-1 _•:;: 
Antonaen, M. 
Aselius. Algot 
Bjornvik, Karl 
Blackley, Albert 
Blank. Charley 
Block. C. 
Block, Herman 
Bohrman. Wm. 
Boisen, Knud 
Borjesson, E. 
Bostrom, Carl 
Brauwer, G. 

Bray, .lack 
Brldgman, B. 
Brillowski, M. 
Brock, He-man 
Bruce. J. 
Buck, Harry 
Burke. Chas. 
Buset. I. 
Christiansen-Bl 8 

en, O. M. 
Christensen, A. 
Christensen, M. 
Conaughton. E. 
Craig, Alex 
Curtis. R. H. 
De Jong. W. 
Poyle. \V. 1>. 
Dlerks, Johannes 
I 'mi. .hi. Herbert 
Durand, Yves 
Durholt. Hugo 
Erickson, E. 
Eriksen. Chas. 
Eriksen-539 
Erlkson, Sven 
Erikson, C. E. 
Erlkson, T. 
Evensen, A. 
Evensen, E. 
Eriksson, F. 
ForBstrom, T. C, 
Fosen, a. 1 1 
Fredricson, chas. 
Fredriksson, A. 
Fristrom, [var 
Gronman-606 
i irunbock, J. 
Gundersen-G l " 
Gulliksen, Gus 
Gunsten, G. 
Gustafson, F. 
Gustafson-600 
Gustafson, Oskar 

Hansen, Hans-1250 
Hansen, P.-l 19 
Hansen, ('lias. G. 
Hansen- 1 150 
Hanson, J. A. 
Hansson-1 270 
Hanson, Adolph 
Haugan, H. 
Heikkinen- 1 1 •".", 
Helander, Chas. 
Heloste. C. E. 
ind, K. M. 
Hinner. Paul 
Hirmansson, K. 
Holm. A. 
Holt, K. C. 
Johansen. Eudv. 
Johanson- 1 664 
Johansson-880 
Johansson-280 
Johannson, J. W. 

S. 
Johnsen, Slgv. B. 
Johnson-1399 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Harry 
Johnson, Walter 

Johnson-] 452 
Jonasson, Frans 
Jorgensen ,P. 
Jorgensen. J. W. 
Jorgensen, Johan 
Jurgensen. Wm. 
Jurgis. J. 

Kosa, P. 
Knaph, John O. 
Knieling, John 
Knudsen, H. 
Knudson. Chris 
Kniiitz, It. N. 
Kressmann, M. 
Krim, August 
Kristensen. S. 
Kristensen. M. 
Kristoffersen, J. 
Kroger. L. H. 
Kronvall. O. 
Kuhlin, Johan 
Kung, B. 

Leiie, Hans a. 
Lfkait. Ch. 
Ltndberg, oJhn 
Lindquist, C. A. 
Eindstrom, Olof 
Ejungberg, W. 
Lobach, Fred 
Lof, Oscar 
Lorensen, Jorgen 
Lorentzen •■ 

t, II. 
Lowrfe, R. A. 
Ludwick. Bert 
Lukin, Th. 
Lund, Martin 
Lundgvist, Oscar 
Lind. Christian 
Lindquist, Karl 
Lindburg, J. 

McCormick, J. 
.Meehan, M. J. 
Melander, Carl 

Michael, Walter 
Michelson. H. M. 

Miller. Ian 
Miller. Harry 
Moltnan. G. 

Mooney, Thomas 



Monrroy, J'. 
Morrisse. D. 
Nelson, Carl A. 
Nelson, II. 
Nelson. A. B, 
Nelsson-698 
Nielsen- ira', 
Nellsori-525 
Nielsen-225 
Nielsen. Peter 
Niemann, ('In. 
Nil sen, Josef 
' 'li usen. L. 

i, Marinus 
(Usen, Jorgen 

l. Hans 
Olsen-538 

I '"•„, L. K. 

i. Anton 

I Usen. I l.-ins 

( Usen, Hans <;. \v. 
Palm, John 
Palmer, .1. II. 
I'asson. Bruno 
Patulny, A'. 
Pearsall, Jerry 
Pearson-4 27 
Pearson, C. A. 
Pedersen-1083 
Pedersen, K. M. 
Pedersen-563 
Pedersen, Peder E. 
Pedersen, Sigurd 
Pedersen, Ed. 
Ramsey, Mo 
Ramsey. Hairy 
Kask. John 
Latin, Anton 
Reay, Stephen A. 
Reese, \v. 
Reichman-506 

ids. .las. 

Richardson, Harry 
Richardson, H. E. 
Samberg, John 
Samuelson, J. 
Sander-1068 
Sandston. F oil 
Sanstrand. Gus. 
Sato, Santos 
Schimelphenig, A. 
Selmbert-887 
Si huhmacher, W. 
Schwencke, c. 
Senden, Victor 
Seppel, J. 
siniis. Chris 
Siem, Cornelius 
Simonsen, Fred 
Smedburg, David 
Smith, John 
Smith, C. H. 
Smith. F. 
Selander, (ins 
Sol He, [ngv. 
Taberman, Erik 
Talbot. A. E. 
Tallant. Christy 
Thestrup, L. P. 
Thomas, Jas. W. 
Thoresen, Pet. 
Thuestad, M. J. 
Tiemann, John 
Tieslng. Ed. A. 

Ckell. H. 

[Jngerer, P. 
Vangsoe, J. P. J. 

v. Lubke, Joh. 
Vassallo. P. 
Volgt, Arthur 
Watson, J. F. 
Weber, Emil 
Wendt, Herman 

\\ ellliei K. A. 

Werner, < Nskar 
Westerberg, N. G. 
Westergren, A. 
Warta, Arthur 

Wiese. ("lias. 
Zervas, John 



Morrison. H. 
Muller, Harry 

Nilsen. Bernt 
Nil son -664 
Nilssen-737 

Nisson. James 
Norbln, Axel 
Nordberg. Oscar 

Nordlund. 1-'. 
Noiris. N. A. 
Nyltind, August 

n,, ma n. .1. i '. 
Olsson, .1. A. 

OlSSOn, Waldemar 
Olsson-562 
Olsson, Gus 
Olsson, K. E. 
Opderbeck, E. 
Osterberg, Carl 

Oversea. Andreas 

Pederson, Olans 
Petersan, Carl-556 
Petersen, Gus E. 

a. Harald 
Peterson, Martin 
Pet row, F. 

i '"i terseii. Chas. I'.. 

I'ettersell, S'Tell 

pel i erson-725 
Petterson-1037 
Phillpp, Max 
Pickelmann. L. 
Prestbyen, Nils 
Richmond, L. 

Robinson. John E. 

Roblsch, Tii'-". 

ell, Theo. 
Rosenblum, J. 
Rosenquist, Alf. 
Rosenstrom. F. 
Ross, Joseph A. 
Rndlnff, R. 
Rustad, Sverre 

s, Frank 
Si 1 1 a ei berg, H. 
Silvers, K. R. 
Skogsfjord, O. 
Smevik. J. J. 
Sorensen-] 192 
Sorensen, T. M. 
Sorensen. Th. 
Sorensen, C. 
Stahn, Otto 
Starkey, W. 
Stedman. G. F. 
Stenberg, Alt'. 
Stone-1816 
Storsten. Henrik 
Steuer, John 

Stjerna, s. M. 
Strandquist, L. 

Lutse. M. 

Swanson-1 252 

Swartholm. C. 
Tierney. John 
Tobin, Austin 
To.lt. John 
Tollefsen. John 
Torkel-503 
Trepln. C. 
Trockel, Frits 
Tyrholm, Johan 

Unruh, Paul 

I'rilie, Felix 

Von Asperen, W. 

Vueia. V. 

v. d. Slugs. W. 

Wifstrand. C. V. 
Williams, It. C. 
Wilson. C. 
Wills, ('"" 
Wlnblad, M. 
Wolf. John J. 
Wolfe, John 
Wolte. Paul 
Young. Alt 



SEATTLE. WASH. 



Aagard, Chr. 

Abrahamson, K. 

Ammel, A. 

Amundsen, P. 

Anderson, J.-7G0 

Anderson, Chas. 

Anderson, A. -650 

Anderson, H.-1073 

Anderson, K. 

Anderson, Anton 

Anderson, Simon 

Austin, Martin 

Ayliffe, A. J. 

Baardsen, Edvard 

Bakke, M. 

Bauer, Frank 

Bergquist, C. 

Berkelund, Rasmus 

Bertelsen, Alf. 

Bjerregaard, Christ. 

Bjorkgren, Otto 

Bodian, T. 

Blora. C. 

Blomberg, G. 

Brandt, W. 

Brown, Frank 

Burke, Thos. 

Brunstrom, U. A. 

Calberg, < iscar 

Calo, Augustin San- 
tos. 

Camp. J. 

Candela, Emil 

Cook, Harry 

Cook, E. D. 

Carlsen, Walter 

Carlson, Eric 

Carlson, J. 

Carlson. A. G. 

Casey. J. 

Casson, H. 

Chevilore. Bollion 

Christensen, P. 

Chrlstenson, C. 

Christiansen, Fred- 
erick. 

Courtney, Ed. 



Daniels, C. 
lianielson. Gustaf 
Danlelson, Axel 
Deislng. Ernst 
Denk, Adolf 
Doran, Eugene 
Duls, J. 
Eckland, Otto 
Elneff, R. H. 
Engberg. Oscar 
Eriksen, Fred 
Eriksen, Eneval 
Eriksen, M. 
Eraser. James 
Fredericksen, Hans 
Freusel. Adolf 
Getz, D. 
Ginstrom. F. 
Gjerlow, Ingaard 
Gorver, John 
Gosling, w. 
Gronberg, Carl 
Guldberg, Randolf 
Gustafsen, K. E. 
Hahner, F. 
Halversen. Halver 
Hansen, H. C. 
Hansen, O. R. 
Hansen, Geo. 
Hansen-1366 

Hardy, w. 

Heggum, L. 
II. din. L. K. 
Hermansen, A. 
Hilke, Carl 
Hogberg, Wm. 
Holm, J. 
Hollappa, Oscar 
Horsley, Robin 
Iverssen, Ole J. 
Jacobs, Geo. 
Jacobsen, A. L. 
Jacobsen, Oscar 
Jacobson, J. P. 
Jansen, J. Ed. 
Jensen, C. H.-569 
Jensen, J. G. 



Johansen, Chris 
Johansen. W. 
Johanson-] 489 
Johanson-1338 
Johansen, Axel 
Johansen, K. 
Johansen, Paul 
Johansson, Evert 
Johannesen, Jo- 
hannes 
Johndahl. Harry 
Johnsen, J. W. 
Johnsen, A. 
Johnsen, John 
Johnson-1516 
Johnson, August 
Johnson. C.-l (89 
Johnson, n. 
Joransen, P. J. 
Karlsson, Julius 
Kelly, P. 
Klemetllla, G. 
Kloperstrom, Wm. 
Knudsen. F. 
Knudsen, H. L. 
Kristoffersen, Karl 
Krlstofferson, Olaf 
Lafstrom, A. 
Lambert, Edward 
Larsen. Peter V. 
Larsen. Hans 

Laurin, J. O. 

Leahy. W. 
Lelsen, W. 

ird. John 
Lewis. George H. 
Lie, A. H. 
Lie. A. 
Lind, Carl 
Lind, Oscar 
Lindholm. Q.-594 
Marthinsen K. M. 
Matlasen, Nels 
McCarthy, John 
M'l lonnld. N. 
M. Niell. J. 
Meyer. G. 
Millard, W. G. 
Miller. James 
Miller, Harrv 
Moore, William 
Moore, J. C. 
Morgan. Oskar 
Morrison, D. 
Murphy, D, 
Neilson. TI. M.-754 
Nelson, Jacob 
Nelson, Nels 
Niekolsen. Axe] 
Nickel, E. 
Niomerph. Aug, 
Nilsen, S.-731 
Nilsen. ( '!• 
Nilsen, John 
Nilsen, Axel 
Nlssen, James 
Nordenholt. J. 
Norholm. K. B. 
Nylander, J. A. 
i irtiger. Geo. 
Olafsen, M. 
O'Laughlin. M. 
Olsen, M.-507 
( Usen, B. 

. L. 
Olsen, Andrew 
Olsen, Anton 
Olsen, John C. 
Olsen, Harry 
Olsen, Olaf H. 
Olson, Claus 



Olson, Oben 
Olson, ReKnvald 
Olsson. Oscar 
Onu, J. 
Orling. Gus 
Oshlin, A. 
Osterling, E. 

. A. 
( >\ erland, T. 
Paar. E. 

Paaverson, O. 

Palsen. 'I'. 
Passo, Andrew 
Patterson, A. -875 
Paverson, O. 
Pedersen, Hans 
Perry, R. 
Peterson. Richard 
Petterson, Chas. 
Pledvache ,Emil 
I'olius, L. 
Punnhagen, Louis 
Qulgly, T. 
Quinn, Daniel 
Ramm. A. 
R. H.-597 
Rosen, E. H. 
Rosness, C. B. 
Roy. P. N. 
Rude, A. M. 
Salomon. 10 . 
Samuelson, A. M. 
Samuelson. E. 
Schabethal, i\ 
Scarabocla, M. 
Sedar, W. 
Simpson, W. 
Smith, Andrew 
Smith. Paul 
Soderman, E. 
Soils. Ingvald 
Solrud. J. 
Sorensen, Soren 
Staaf. L. 
Steckman, G. W. 
Steffenson. S. 
Stenberg, T. 
Sterro, J. 
Storhelm, E. N. 
Stossle, C. 
Svendsen, B. H. 
Svendsen, Olaf 
Svenson. A. -1193 
Svensen, J. 
Swansen, F. I. 
Swansen, Chas. 

Swansen. Iver 
Thingwall. E. 
Thorn. A. 
Thornton, Thomas 
Timm. K. 
Tornstrom, C. A. 
Turnbull, R. R. 
Turner, Fred 
Tuttle, C. D. 
Van Ree, W. 
Vogt, C. 
Yerna. I'. 
Vvplnkel. L. 
Walsh, J. 
Weger, P. 
Well, Charles 
Kennerlund. A. 
West, James 
Westcott. W. 
Wick, Ole 
Wight, U. 
Wind. J. 
Wlnhneskl. F. 
Tunker, Paul 



PORTLAND, OR. 



Ardelenu, Joan 
Andersen, N. 
Bregler. Friedrich 
Carnaghan, Wm. 

Clifford, Ellc 
I )iederichsen, 

Heinr.-786 
Engebretsen, Mar- 
cus 
Fristrom, Ivar 
Hermanson, Albert 
Holstenborg, Olaf 
I vers, John 
Janson, Oscar 
Jacohsson, John 
Johansen, Chris- 

1592 
Johansen. Viv-1238 



Krane, Karl 
Klover. H.-4G3 
Lie, Henry 
McLauglin 
Magnusson-1147 
McGregor, John A. 
Moe. John 
Robinson, John 

Herbert 
Sjostrom. S. E. 
Seibert, Henry 
Swensson, l.. 
Soderman, Elis 
linger, Paul 
Valet, Erling 
Vanstone. Jack 
Westin, John 



EUREKA, CAL. 



Andersen, Chas. 
Arversen, Arturt 
Bostrom. N A. 
Boysson, B. C. 
Forstrom, H.-500 
Brown. J. C.-1027 
Gottberg, J. -622 



Larsen, Alfred 
Olsen, Anton 
Olsen, Arthur G. 
Olsen. H. 
Potujansky. R. 
Spreeslis, F. 
Thorsen, Peter 



Hansen, Hans T. Walburg, oJhn 
HONOLULU, H. T. 



Anderson, Gilbert 
Baldvin, Melmer 
Hasel, Gustaf 
Hubraber, W. 
Johnson, H. 
Jorgensen, Ras- 
muss 



Lange, Max 
Larson, Werner 
Molden, Jakot 
Olber, Morsehlns 
O'Harrow, Frank E. 
Pad, S. V.-478 
Sundherg, John 



Jorgensen. Rasmus Wieb roc, Charley 
Kearon, William 



Letters in the Office of the Fishermen's 
Union of the Pacific Coast and Alaska, 
San Francisco. 



Fishermen's Lis, 
Bjorstrom, Carl 
Ekstrand, Frank 
Gustafson, A. A. 
Jensen, Carl-268 
Johnson, Henry 
Jacobsson, C. E. 
Mick. Caccicco 



Nelson, John 
Knudtsen, Hans O. 
Sterens, Vint. 
Peter, Chas. W. 
Smith, Harry 
Vogt, Wilhelm 
Wilson, Harry 



DEMAND THIS LABEL 



15SUEO BY AUTHORITY OP 



WHEN PURCHASING OVERALLS, SHIRTS, OILSKINS, OR 
READY-MADE CLOTHING OF ANY DESCRIPTION ! 









COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 




LOOK FOR 

Jewelers' Union Label 

On Back of Each 

BUTTON ^g 

International Seamen's Union of Amorica 

BUTTONS 

For Sailors, Firemen, Cooks and 
Fishermen 

FIFTY CENTS EACH 

ED. ANDERSEN 

7 Fast St. SAN FRANCISCO 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



HOFFMAN CIGAR STORE 



Union-made Cigars and Tobacco. 
No Asiatics Employed. 



W. C. BERGIN, Proprietor 

Corner Hotel and Nuuanua Streets, 

HONOLULU, H. T. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Anderson, Fritz 
Abrahamson, A. 
Anderson-512 
Anderson, A. -1060 
Anderson, Ed. 
Anderson, Eskil 
Andersen, L.-1245 
Anderson, Axel 
Begovich, J. 
Berthelsen, A. 
Bernhardsen, C. 
Block, Hermann 
Blrkelund, R. 
Caiman, George 
Chlausen, J. 
Danielsen, D. 
Dishler, Peter 
Dittmayer, Ch. 
Dyb<=land, P. Th. 
Eckman, G. A. 
Elfstrom, J. 
Farstad, K. E. 
Ehlers, Henry 
Hanson, J. F. & F. 
Hanston, Rob. 
Hansen, Henrik 
Hansen, Th. 
Hansen, Wm. 
Jacobson, John 
Jensen, P. 
Jugman, M. 
Janhunen, W. 



Kelly, Patrick 
Klinker, J. 
Kenna, P. J. 
Martin, John F. 
Mikkelsen, Alf. 
Murphy, P.-919 
Mietinnen, Adolf 
Moe, John 
Nilsen, M. P. 
Nilsen, N. A. 
Nielsen, N. F.-51. 
Olsen, Servin 
Olsen, Adolf 
Olsen, Emiel M. 
Peterson, John 
Pederson, Hans 
Paar, Ernst 
Palmer, James 
Pettersen-415 
Reynolds, Roy 
Salvesen, Sam 
Schwenke, Carl 
Sylvain, Cloa 
Swanson, Oscar 
Sorensen, M. 
Sillman, A. 
Svenson, John 
Swenson, James 
Thies, Harry 
Weissin, Charles 
Werner, Frederick 
Zambuera, M. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



Abrahamsen, Aslak 
Anderson, S. K. 
Brown, H. S. 
Christianson, An- 
ton 
Garside, James 
Glasoe, A. 
Grant, Bert 
Hansen, Carl 
Hubsher, W. 
Jurgensen, W. P. 
Jonsson, Axel 
Kunigk, A. 
Kivstein, J.-262 
L,arsen, John 
Leupstadius, Chas. 



Lie .Jens L. 
Llndblom, Wolter 
Mathisen, Ole A. 
Malmberg, Robert 
Martinsson, H. E. 
Nissen, Jens 
Olsson, Otto 
Pedersen, Dick 
Ross, Ben 
Smith, James 
Stoessle Camilie 
Sorensen, Soren 
Strom, John 
Thomas, Hamon 
Thomsen, Thomas 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Allen, Frans 
Anderson-1119 
Currie, Jas. 
Edlund, J. A. 
Engebretsen, M. 
Gilhooly. H. 
Gottschalk, Max 
Hinner, G. 
Ingebretsen, Nils- 

407 
Jensen, Jens 
Jensen, Johan 
Jensen, V. E. 
Johansson. John L. 
Karlson, Julius 



Larsen, J. H. 
L,undberg, H. 
Mikkelsen, Julius 
Olsen, Sam 
Olson, O. A. -104 
Pearson, J. L. 
Perry, Ben 
Piedwache, Emile 
Roman, Ted 
Schilling, C. 
Smith, J. A. 
Stone, M. 
Swenson, H. 
Thomsen, Thomas 



Office of the Marine 
Stewards' Association, 

Pane, Fred 
Prell. H. 
Purdy, Harry 
Romero. S. 
Ruderman, Jacob 
Shreve, H. S. 
Smith, J. P. 
Vlnce, H. 
Waring, H. 
Yager, Ralph 
York, Geo. 



Letters in the 

Cooks and 

Seattle, Wash. 
Brady, W. L. 
Brantford, Chas, 
Fuller, E. E. 
HafTord, H. 
Harrigan, E. 
Klool, Mr. 
Lewis, Miles 
Magnusen, Gus 
McCarthy, T. J. 
Menton, John 
O'Brien, P. 

Letters in the Office of the Marine 
Cooks and Stewards' Association, San 
Francisco. 



Ahlqulst, F. W. 
Alverson, Edward 
Anderson, A. F. 
Aspengren, Theo- 

dor. 
Beardall, Robert 
Branford, chas. 
Campbell, Neil H. 
Cederholm, Victor 
Duke, Charles 
Gleason, Wm. 
Godley, G. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hanslng, W. 
Henryks, Bert 
Jensen, J. C. 
Jessamine, James 
Jorgenson, Chas. 
Kendall, E. C. 
Kennedy, Thomas 
Kloot, Johannes 
McConaghy, Dav. 
McDonald, T. 
McLaughlin, Hugh 



McStay, Edward 
Miller, A. T. 
Mills, A. 
Nelson, Frank 
Olsen, Charles 
Palmer. John W. 
Pestell, Stanley 
Pons. Simon S. 
Purday, Harry 
Rios, Manuel 
Roberts. Stanley 
Sannino, Giuseppe 
Spidowsky, Theodor 
Turner, W. 
Veldon, Thos. 
Wickstrom. John 
Wilson, Joe 
Wilson, J. T. 
Wilson, Peter 
Wllshart, Dav. 
Wolf, John 
Wolters, Geo. 
Young, Charles 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE.) 

General Outfitters for Men and Boys 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m. ; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE. TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. 
Store closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 



1332 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



WHEN IN FORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

WALTER EBRLICHMAN, 717 Pacific Ave. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



HOQUIAM, WASH. 



OLD TACOMA CICAR STORE 

J. A. DAVID, Prop. 

A Full Line of Cigars, Tobaccos 
and Smokers' Articles 

Union Made Goods a Specialty. 
2319 NORTH 30th ST. 

OLD TACOMA, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



When in Fort at Gray's Harbor Call 
at the 

Horseshoe Store 

HOQUIAM, WASH. 

For your Clothing, Furnishing Goods, 

Hats, Shoes, Rubber Boots 

and Oilskins. 

Honest Goods at Honest Prices. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing & Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS 

FORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in union-made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



Chas. Eisenbeis F. W. Eisenbels 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

EISENBEIS & SON 

Dealers in 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Crack- 
ers. Ships' Stores a Specialty. 
316 Water St., Fort Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. (Inc ) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Fort Townsend, Wash. 
Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Fort Townsend, Wash. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



BURNETT BROS. 

JEWELERS AND 
CHRONOMETER 
MAKERS. . . . 

Union Made 
Watches & Jewelry 

19 HERON ST., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



News from Abroad. 




UNION HARDWARE STORE 

WM. GRIGGS 
404 Heron Street, Aberdeen, Wash. 



Fine Pocket Knives, Tin 
Ware and Granite Ware. 



BARKLEY CYR CO. 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 
n6 SOUTH "G" STREET 

ABERDEEN, - WASH. 



W. C. JUDSON 

EXPRESSMAN 

Sailors' Patronage Solicited. 
Phone 693 ABERDEEN, WASH. 



(Continued on Page 14.) 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 

315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND 

VEGETABLES. 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. . 



When in Fort at Aberdeen ai.d looking 
for Union Goods call on 

L. FOGEL 

Watch for the Red Front, 24 Heron St. 

Headquarters for Seamen's Outfits. 

Everything from a pair of Rubber Bootb 

to a Tailor-made Suit. 



FOR UNION-MADE 

Tobacco and Cigars 

GO TO 

F. KINGSTAD 

Stand on Enerance to Union Office. 
ABERDEEN, WASH. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

The followinb seamen arc inquired dor 
bj the Consul of Sweden and Norway at 
San Francisco: Alfred Svenson, from 
Gothenburg; Axel Edw. Rutgerson, from 
Gothenburg; Oscar Dahlgren, from New 
Yurie; Eelmer Hansen, from Norland; 
Ole llalwir Sorensen, from Christiania; 
Hugo Svenson, from Wisby; Axel Vit - 
bro, from Trondhjt m . 

Wilhelm Jurgensen, a native of Plena 
burg, Germany, member of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, is inquired for by 
his father. Address, Coast Seamen 's 
Journal. 



The ashes of Sir Henry Irving, the En- 
glish actor, were buried in Westminster 
Abbey on October 20. 

The Prince and Princess of Wales 
started from London, Eng., on October 
19, on their five months' tour of India. 

It is reported that Fridtjog Nansen, 
the Arctic explorer, will be appointed 
Norwegian Minister at Washington, D. C. 

A movement is afoot in Germany to 
greatly increase the naval strength of 
that country, owing to popular distrust 
of Great Britain. 

The centenary of the death of Lord 
Nelson, at the Battle of Trafalgar, was 
observed in London, Eng., on October 20 
and 21. 

An Imperial manifesto was issued at 
St. Petersburg on October 19, proclaim- 
ing the ratification of the peace treaty 
between Russia and Japan. 

Admiral Togo arrived at Yokohama on 
October 20 on his flagship, the battleship 
Shikishima. Forty warships have now as- 
sembled in that harbor in preparation 
for the great naval review of October 30. 

Grand Duke Vladimir, eldest uncle of 
the Czar, has tendered his resignation as 
commander of the military district of St. 
Petersburg, and his resignation has been 
accepted. He will be succeeded by Lieu- 
tenant-General Gripenberg. 

It is officially announced that the Mi- 
kado will proceed to the Temple of Ise 
to report the conclusion of peace with 
Russia. The date of his journey has not 
yet been fixed. A personal visit of the 
Mikado to this temple is a rare event. 

The French and Portuguese commis- 
sioners have agreed on a delimitation of 
the boundary of the French and Portu- 
guese possessions on the Guinea Coast, 
West Africa, after making mutual con- 
cessions of territory. 

A revolution is reported to have broken 
out in the province of Ohyung Chyong, in 
Northern Corea, and is spreading to 
Kang You Province. The Japanese sent 
troops to suppress the rebellion after the 
Corean Government had failed to take 
steps. 

The Australian Federal House of Rep- 
resentatives, on October 19, adopted, by 
33 to 21, a motion to petition King Ed- 
ward to grant home rule to Ireland. The 
Senate, by 16 to 11, adopted a motion to 
the effect that home rule should be 
granted to Ireland. 

Russia is believed to be on the eve of 
great events. It is said that well-inten- 
tioned men have gained access to the 
Czar and have made known to him the 
whole truth concerning the situation in 
the interior, and that the latter has de- 
cided to grant a constitution shortly. 

It is believed that the Japanese Gov- 
ernment sent an order to Manchurian 
headquarters to commence the evacuation 
of Japanese troops on October 16. It is 
expected that Japan will effect a com- 
plete wthdrawal of her troops in six 
months. 

The Russian War Office lias communi- 
cated the news of the ratification of the 
peace treaty to General Linevitch, who 
has been ordered to arrange the neces- 
sary steps to carry out the provisions for 
the withdrawal of the Russian troops 
from Manchuria in eighteen months. 

Negotiations for the liberation of the 
British officers, Captain Crowther and 
Lieutenaul Eatton, who were captured 
l,v Moroccan tribesmen, have been suc- 
cessful. The British scout ship Path- 
finder has sailed from Tangier for CeutS 

with Valient, the brigand chief, on board 
to ellcd an exchange of prisoners. 
A dispatch from Paris says that from 

the mass of contradictory revelations and 
denials, the fact stands out that the 
Morocco controversy took Germany and 
Prance dangerously near to war, and that 

(ireat Britain, while not. officially promis- 
ing military aid, stood ready to give 
Prance her loyal support. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






Labor News. 



The Shonts Commission has made large 
reductions in the salaries of Panama 
Canal officials, and general complaint is 
being made by those affected. 

The Chicago Federation of Labor, at 
its regular weekly meeting on October 15, 
declared against the proposed plan to es- 
tablish a bank under the auspices of the 
local labor organizations. 

The refusal of the Truck Owners' As- 
sociation of New York City to accede to 
the demands of the international Broth- 
erhood of Teamsters resulted on October 
21 in a strike which may involve the en- 
tire trucking business of that city. 

It is understood in manufacturing cir- 
cles that within a short time the Fall 
River (Mass.) Cotton Manufacturers' 
Association will grant an advance in 
wages to the operatives, numbering up- 
ward of 25,000 now employed in Associa- 
tion mills. 

The Separate Statehood constitutional 
convention, which convened at South Sic- 
Alester, I. T., on October 14, voted 
unanimously to eliminate the "Open 
Shop" clause in the constitution, and or- 
ganized labor will therefore support the 
"Separate Staters." 

As the result of the strike of 
printers at the Schenectady (N. Y.) 
plant of the General Electric Company, 
which has been on for the past five 
weeks, the company has decided to aban- 
don its printing department and have 
its work done outside of the works. 

The miners in the employ of G. B. 
Markle & Co., who struck recently, decid- 
ed to return to work on October LM. 
The driver boy who was the cause of the 
trouble will remain idle until the ques- 
tion of his wages is decided by the con- 
ciliation board. 

The recent action of the Philadelphia 
(Pa.) Central Labor Union in formally 
indorsing the Republican municipal tick- 
et lias created great dissatisfaction 
among many affiliated unions, and a 
number of resolutions repudiating tin 
action have been passed by the latter. 

The United States battleship Connecti- 
cut is again the leader in the construc- 
tion race between the Newport News 
Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, 
building the Louisiana, and the Govern- 
ment force at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, 
building the Connecticut, according to 
the construction statement for Septem- 
ber. 

The Fall River (Mass.) Textile Coon 
cil, representing the organized cotton 
mill operatives of that city, has decided 
to reject the offer made by the Manu- 
facturers' Association to advance wages 
the restoration of the 12% per cut 
which went into effect on July 25, 1904. 
No trouble in the mills is anticipated, 
and it is probable that further negotia- 
tions will be conducted during the pres- 
ent week. 

The injunction restraining the mem- 
ben of Typographical Union No. 16, of 
Chicago, 111., from interfering with tin 
firms composing the Chicago Typothe- 
tae during the present strike of the un- 
ion printers by meansof pickets or other- 
wise, ha3 been sustained by Judge Hold- 
out in a decision which classes the efforts 
of the members of the Typographical 
Union to force a contract for an eight - 
hour day and for a "Closed Shop" up- 
on the employers as unlawful. 

Judge Gary, in the Superior Court at 
Chicago, 111., on September IS ruled that 
if a union tells a contractor that its men 
will not work with a non-union man, and 
if as a result the non-union man is dis- 
charged and is unable to secure employ- 
ment on account of the attitude of tin- 
unions toward him, the union is not liable 
for damages to the non-union man. The 
case involved $35,000 damages sought by 
a non-unionist from the Brotherhood of 
Painters, Decorators and Paper Hang- 
ers. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



SAWTELLE CLOTHING STORE 

H. A. SCHWARTZ, Prop. 



Headquarters for Seamen's Wearing Apparel. 
A complete line of Union Made goods in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats, Furnishing Goods, 
Oil Clothing, Rubber Boots, etc., etc. 



AGENTS FOR W. L. DOUGLAS 

$3.00 to $5.00, Union Made. 



SHOES 



Just around corner 
from Union Office. 



307 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



HERMAN SCHULZE 
CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F 

EUREKA. CAL. 



White Labor Only 



CITY OF COPENHAGEN 

J. A. ANDERSON, Proprietor. 



BOARD AND LODGING 

$5.00 PER WEEK. 
Neatest and Cleanest Place in Town. 



CORNER FIRST AND D STREETS. 



The Finest Beer Brewed on the Coast 
by the 

Humboldt Brewing Co. 

2996-3048 Broadway. 

Delivered and shipped to any part of 
the City and County on short notice. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG. 



Manufacturer of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottler and dealer in En- 
terprise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



J. Perry 



P. Hess 



UNION TRANSFER 
Baggage and Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES 
Office, 119 D Street 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDG. 
Phone Main 70. EUREKA, CAL. 



SMOKE) 

The "Popular Favorites," the "Little 
Eeauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 



532 Second St., 



EUREKA, CAT.. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 



First-class Board and Lodging 

Reasonable Rates. 



Front Street, between C and D, 
EUREKA, CAL. 



The Humboldt Ldging hn 

F. BORGES, Proprietor. 

NEATEST AND CLEANEST PLACE 
IN EUREKA. 



313 FIRST STREET. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 

OSCAR SWANSON, Proprietor. 
An old-time Union Man. 



Board and lodging,2 $5 per week. 
Single meals, 25c. Beds, 25c. and 50c. 



322 First Street, between D and E, 
EUREKA, CAL. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

OB 

SQUARE MEAL 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D St., Eureka, Cal. 

\V.\I. GOKTZ. Prop. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



5 



ISSUED BY 



TMQWlTY OP 






From 
..Maker to Wearer.. 



The only Clothing Establishment on the Pacific Coast selling goods at less 
than Eastern Prices. 

JACOBSEN. CLOTHIER 

Manufacturer and Retailer 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS AND FURNISHINGS. 

812 and 814 FIRST AVENUE. ., SEATTLE. WASH. 



WE ARK GOING OUT OF BUSINESS 
i;v xi iVEMBER 30th. 

EVERYTHING REDUCED 

Lion Clothing House 

First Avenue, South, Corner Main, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



B0NNEY & STEWART 

UNDERTAKERS 
Third & Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a 
specialty. All orders by telephone 
or telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 




SHOE & CLOTHING COMPANY 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 



615=617 First Ave. 



OPPOSITE 
TOTEM POLE 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SGHCOL 

navigation and nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH Principal 

Miss Helen C. Smith Assistant 

Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Naviga- 
tion. Successful Compass Adjuster. 
Ocean license unlimited. Steam and 
sail, American and British. 
472 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE "OUR HOUSE" CIGAR STORE 

E. J. HABERER, Proprietor, 

151 WASHINGTON ST., SEATTLE. 



Carries a full line of Cigars, Tobaccos 
and Smokers' Articles. 

UNION-MADE GOOES A SPECIALTY. 

Telephone ind. 118. 
EUREKA. CAL. 

Pavilion Hotel 

<;. FK.N'KI.i.. Proprietor. 
FIRST-CLASS HOARD AND LODGING 

$5.0() PER WEEK. 

Corner Third and C Streets, n"xt door to 

Sailors' Union Hall. 

EUREKA, CALIFORNIA. 

PORTLAND, OR. 

F. F. JOHNSON 
Express and Storage 

STAND BURNSIDE AND FRONT STS. 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

For Quick Work at Reasonable Prices 
Phone Pacific 462. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

C. J. BERENDES 

SOUTH SIDE HOTEL 

806 THIRD STREET, 
Between Berry and Xing Streets. 

The rooms are all newly furnished 
and the accommodations first class. 
Board and Lodging, $5 per week. All 
rooms single. 



ODD FELLOWS CEMETERY 

AT COLMA 

Near San Francisco 
Is now ready for interments 

Telephones West 8J6 aDd 
Church 5568 



Union Made by Union Maids 



A 



Zo 
HI 



■ Q ™ 

m n 

3 =5 co 



ill r- rn |>1 

U) ^ i — 3 * nj 

- S» 2 OO z, < n 

* ± *— © n H 

2 ^ . " "0 

A n mmmi ™ PI 



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• m 
x 



rn 



V 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts of 
Dietrich Doerflein, a native of Nuern- 
berg, Bavaria, and a sailor by profes- 
sion, who in former years was a mate 
on this Coast, but since 1890 was not 
heard of again, will please send infor- 
mation to the German Consulate at San 
Francisco, 318 Sacramento St. 

George Jordan, a native of Germany, 
last heard from in August, 1902, at 
Port Townsend, Wash., is inquired for 
by the German Consulate at San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

James Thorburn, age about 22, was 
recently staying at the Scandinavian 
Sailors' Home, San Francisco-, is inquired 
for. Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

K. A. Johnson, last heard of in the 
schooner William Rendal, in 1902, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal, 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



b 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

240 Montgomery St., Cor. Fine. 

Booms 14-15-16. Phone Main 5719. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 
a Specialty. 



CITY FRONT DRUG STORE 

W. I. BOURNS, Proprietor. 

10 Mission Street 
Phone Bush 810. San Prancisco. 

Careful attention given to Supply- 
ing Ships with Drugs. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 California Street, San Francisco. 



Guaranteed Capital and 

Surplus $ 2,500,098.42 

Capital actually paid up 

in cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, June 30, 1905... 37,738,672.17 

Board of Directors. 
John Lloyd, President; Daniel Mey- 
er, 1st Vice-President; Emil Rohte, 2d 
Vice-President; Ign. Steinhart, T. N. 
Walter, N. Ohlandt, J. W. Van Bergen, 
P. Tillmann Jr., and E. T. Kruse. 



A. H. R. Schmidt, Cashier; Wm. 
Hermann, Asst. Cashier; Geo. Tourny, 
Secretary; A. H. Muller, Aset. Secre- 
tary; W. S. Goodfellow. General Atty. 



California Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company 

Receives Savings Deposits of 
Ten Dollars and Upwards. 

IT PAYS INTEREST 

TWICE A YEAR. 

Rate — 

314 per cent on ordinary accounts 

3 6/10 per cent on term accounts 

CAPITAL Su SURPLUS, $ 1.521,711.98 
TOTAL ASSETS. - 7,888,697.13 



Deposits may be made by P. O. 
Order, Wells-Fargo Money Order 
or Bank Draft 

Send for Pamphlets Descriptive 
of our Business 



OFFICES 

Cor. California and Montgomery Sis 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




A WANDEBEB WITHOUT A HOME 

in his old age a man is likely to become 
who is improvident in his youth. Culti- 
vate the saving habit in both yourself 
and your children and it will redound to 
your benefit when life's sun is setting 
Put your savings in a safe and prosper- 
ous institution where it will be making 
money for you while you sleep. 

We pay 3% per cent on savings ac- 
counts and 4 per cent on term deposits, 
compounding the interest every six 
months. Safe deposit boxes for rent 
from $2.50 per year upwards. 

Hank is open from 5 to 8 p. m. Satur- 
days. 

THE MARKET STREET BANK, 

Seventh and Market Streets, 
San Francisco. 



California Undertaking Co. 

PRIVATE - RESIDENCE - PARLORS 

B. J. Devlin. Manager 

Wm M. lindsey, Secretary 

713 POST ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

EMBALMING A SPECIALTY 

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT TELEPHONE EAST 1263 



Frank J. Symmes, President Henry Brunner, Cashier 

Chas. Nelson, Vice-President F. F. Ouer, Asst. Cashier 

O. A. Hale, Vice-President Otto Ottesen, Asst. Cashier 

E. W. Runyon, Vice-President 

CENTRAL TRUST CO. OF CALIFORNIA 

42 Montgomery Street, Corner of Sutter Street, S4IM FRANCISCO 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS PAID IN. - - $1,765,000.00 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

3V4% per Annum on Ordinary Deposits 3 6/10% per Annum on Term Deposits 

We sell Drafts and Money Orders on all cities 
In Norway, Sweden and Denmark at Cheapest Rates 
Our Bank in Norway is: Our Bank in Denmark Is: 

Central Banken for Norge In Den Danske Landmands Bank In 

Christiania. Copenhagen. 

Our Bank in Sweden is: Skanes Enskilda Bank in Malmo. 
We write and speak the Scandinavian languages. 
DIRECTORS: 
F. W. Dohrmann James Madison John M. Keith 

Frank J. Symmes Gavin McNab E. W. Runyon 

Henry Brunner Charles F. Leege G. H. TJmbsen 

C. C. Moore J. M. Vance R. D. Hume 

W. A. Frederick Charles Nelson 



Chas. Webb Howard 
Geo. C. Perkins 
Mark L. Gerstle 
E. A. Denicke 
O. A. Hale 



FRANK 
BROS. 



Union-made Clothes 
Tailor-made Clothes 
Underwear S? Shoes 
Hats ^ V? * * 



Cor.KEARNY&SACBAMENTOSTS. 



San Francisco. 



Political Printing 

ALL KINDS 

The James H.Barry Co. 

("The Star" Office) 

429 MONTGOMERY ST. 

Phone Main 358 

GOOD WORK FAIR PRICES 



M. A. MAHER 

MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS 

Boots, Tobacco, Cutlery, etc. 
United Working-men's Shoes. 

Also Agency for the Orthopedic Shoe. 

206 East St., near Howard. 
Phone Red 4272. San Francisco. 



JOE HARRIS 

SEA-FARING MEN'S OUTFITTER 

Ready-Made Uniforms. 

Cap Making a Specialty. 

5 JACKSON ST., NEAR EAST, 

Tel. John 3661. San Erancisco. 



EXPRESSING 

Done by 

CHRIS. JORTALL 

Stand at Union Office, 
Southwest Corner East and Mission Sts. 



GREEN'S UNION STORE 

14 CLAY ST., one Block North of 
Market St., near Perry. 

SAILORS' OUTFITS 

Best qi ality Rubber Boots and Oil 
Clothing, Shoes, Flannel Underwear, 
Hats, etc. 

ALL WITH THE UNION LABEL. 
We give you a square deal. 



D. EDWARDS 

4 MISSION ST., SAN PRANCISCO 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

We sell the kind of Goods you require. 
Extra Strong Hickory Shirts \ 
Best Overalls \ UN I ON 

Good Lumber Shoes LABEL 

Stockton Flannel Underwear/ 
\lso a full line of Gentlemen's Furnlsh- 
' ing Goods and Hats. Look at our 
goods. You will be pleased. No trou- 
ble to show them. 



SMOKE 



RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO. 

324 BATTERY ST., S. F. 



To Sail 
To=Day 



The clipper ship " UNIOIM- 
MADE" maimed by a Union 
crew and stocked in hold 
and on deck with Union 
goods — Union clothing at 
the Red Front — Union Label 
on more garments than any 
other store in 'Frisco — -We 
ask the patronage of Union 
men on account of our hav- 
ing placed Union-made goods 
within their reach — From 
Hats to Shoes — We handle 
them all. 

A WORD ABOUT SHOES 

A new department with us 
— Union-made — Just the sort 
of shoes a Union sailor re- 
quires-^Good shoes. 



The Red Front 
Clothing Co. 

MARKET ST., &£„ 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



STILL ON DECK 

ED. ANDERSEN 

7 EAST ST., NEAR MARKET 

Cigars, Tobacco and Notions 

UNION-MADE GOODS A SPECIALTY. 
LUMBER HOOKS. 



Domestic and Naval. 



Union Boot and 
Shoe Store... 

Repairing Neatly Doue 

C. LESTER 
12 Stenart Street. 




The Hamburg-American liner Ameri- 
ka arrived at New York on October 20, 
on her maiden voyage. The new steamer 
lias a length of 690 feet, a breadth of 74 
feet and a depth of 53 feet. 

The directors of the Cunard Steamship 
Company have appointed William Wil- 
son, heretofore deputy-chairman, chair- 
man in succession to Lord Inverclyde, 
who died on October 5. Sir William For- 
wood was elected deputy-chairman in 
succession to Mr. Wilson. 

The North German Lloyd Steamship 
Company it is said, is contemplating ab- 
andoning Southampton, Eng., as an out- 
ward point of call, calling at Dover, in- 
stead. If the plan is caried out it prob- 
ably will go into effect in January. Ply- 
mouth will remain a homeward port of 
call. 

Twenty-four vessels were wrecked and 
! wenty lives lost in a heavy storm which 
swept over the Great Lakes on October 
20. The heaviest loss of life occurred 
1111 the Canadian schooner Minnedosa, 
which foundered in Lake Huron, off Har- 
bor Beach. Nine persons were drowned 
Prom that craft. 

Captain Rumell, the mate, cook, en- 
gineer and one negro seaman of the four- 
masted schooner Henry A. Berwind were 
murdered at sea by three negroes, also 
members of the crew, while bound from 
Mobile to Philadelphia. The three mu- 
tineers were landed at Southport, N. C, 
on October 11, by the schooner Blanche 
H. King. 

The British steamer Manchester Com- 
merce, from Manchester, passed at Phila- 
delphia, Pa., reports that on September 
10, in latitude 46.08 north, longitude 
•55.10 west, she passed a sunken fisher- 
men 's boat and a derelict, with one spar 
standing about thirty feet out of the 
water. The hull of the derelict was 
painted red and the deck was awash. 

The figures of the recent gunnery prac- 
tice on the United States cruiser Colorado 
show that with the six-inch gun at a 
range of 3500 yards, and the target be- 
ing of triangular canvas, forty shots 
were fired and thirty-nine hits were 
made. The percentage of accuracy was 
98. Ten shots were fired from each of 
the four eight-inch rifles and but three 
misses were recorded. 

After a conference between Secretary 
of State Root and Sir Mortimer Durand, 
the British Embassador, it was an- 
Qouneed that a speedy and satisfactory 
solution of the Gloucester-Newfoundland 
fisheries controversy was in sight. Sec- 
retary Root informed the Embassador 
that an American register is a ship 's 
highest form of nationality and carries 
with it not only a license to trade, but 
also a regular fishing license. 

There is said to be a conflict of opin- 
ion in the Navy Department as to the 
best means and route for taking the steel 
floating drydock built in Maryland to its 
destination at Olongapo, Philippine Isl- 
ands. Many naval officers believe it will 
be wrecked if sent around the Cape, and 
others are equally certain it will go to 
pieces in the Suez Canal and block traf- 
fic there, at immense cost to the United 
States Government in damages. 

In the kflnaal. report of Captain W. B. 
Diehl, Judge Advocate General of the 
Navy, the record of general courts-mar- 
tial for the focal year shows that twelve 
Commissioned officers were convicted am' 

three acquitted, vhile 905 enlisted met 
were convicted and thirty acquitted 
The record of summary court} martial 
shows that '1157 bluejackets were convict- 
ed ami 200 acquitted and Hint, L015 ma- 
rines (enlisted men) were convicted and 
Beventy-seven acquitted. A total of 422 
, nlisted men were convicted of desertion, 
117 of absence without leave, twenty-five 
of desertion and fraudulenl enlistment, 
and eighty-three of fraudulent enlist- 
inent . 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 

Made for Him.— Hicks— " Senator Dul- 
lard seems to have acquired a reputation 
as a wit. ' ' 

Wicks — "Yes, he was interviewed onee 
by a bright reporter. ' ' 



Aim Higher.— "When I say good-by 
to you this evening," said Mr. Slowman, 

"do you think it would be proper for me 
to pis "»' reverent kiss upon your fair 

hand 

"Well." She replied coquottishly. "1 

would consider it decidedly out of 

place. ' ' 



Looked That Way. — Teacher— " All 
birds are bipeds— that is, they have two 
feet." 

Tommy— "The duck ain't." 

Teacher— "Oh, yes, the duck lias two 
feet." 

Tommy — "No, ma'am; I'll bel 
they're oars." 



Insulting her.— Mrs. Nuritch — "1 
want to get a pair of swell white gloves 
to wear to a ball." 

ik— "Yes 'in. How long do you 
want them?" 

Mrs. Nuritch— "See, here, young man. 
I ain't talkin' about rent in' 'em. I 
want to buy 'em." 



Dumb Luck— "Ah!" cried the first 
golfer, gleefully, after making a lucky 
stroke; "that was clever, eh?" 

"Huh!" snorted his opponent, die 
gUBtedly, "you carry an accident insur 
ance policy, don't you?" 

"Yes. Why?" 

"YOU should collect it after that 
shot. ' ' 



It Made Him Wild.— Father— " From 
my observation of him last night I canu 
to the conclusion that young man of 
yours was rather wild." 

Daughter— "Of course. It was your 
constant observation that made him wild. 
He wanted you to go upstairs and leave 
us alone." 



A Deep Scheme.— Hieks— " It 's funny. 
Burroughs is forever preaching to his 

friends about the necessity of saving 
their money. 

Wicks— "Well?" 

Hicks— "Well, he's the last fellow in 
the world who should preach that." 

Wicks— "Not at all. The more Ids 
friends save the more lie has a chance to 
borrow. ' ' 



LUNDSTROM'S 



$2.50 Hats 



UNION 
MADE 

Made by 

PACIFIC COAST 

HAT WORKS 

1458 Market St., opposite Centra) 
Theater, and 605 Kearny Street. 



Country Orders Solicited. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 



Bagley's 
Lime Kiln 
Club 



mUMOS^SSSK INTIMATIDIUl 




Established 
Over 

30 Years 
on the 
Pacific 
Coast 



Every Package bears 
the Union Label 




\taimade 
Clothing 




We are one of the pioneers to adopt the union 
rment Workers. We manufacture all our clothing In 
our own workshops, and all of it is made by union men. Ours are 
the only thoroughly union clothing stores in San Francisco. 

Other stores have only a few union-made lines to show union men 
when they call. But everything is union-made in our store. 

In purchasing here you buy direct from the makers at a saving 
of middlemen's profits. 

Ready-to-wear suits and overcoats $10.00 to $35.00. 

Made-to order suits and overcoats $10.00 to $45.00. 

Garments can be purchased in either one of our two stores. 



TWO LARGE 
STORES 



S. N. WOOD & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Cor. POWELL & ELLIS 
AND 740 MARKET 



James A* Sorensen Co. 

WATCHMAKERS, JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 




103 to 111 SIXTH STREET, 
Telephone Jessie 2821 



Below Mission. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Eyes 



James jf. Soronsan, 



All Watch Repairing Warranted for two years. 
Tested Free by an Expert Optician. 

ALARM CLOCKS REDUCED TO 45 CENTS. 

Open Evenings till 8 p. m. Saturdays, 10 p. m. 

THE BIG JEWELRY STORE 



SMOKERS 



See that this labei (in light blue) 
appears on the box from which 
you are served. 



c^?Siuvv^cixin?CDCi3cn>;s[PT.i88o, , crx . 

i Issued by Auihoniyoi the Cigar Makers' International union 

Union-made Cigars. 

IhtS (tnllflfS. lrcittlceOcjars etximned IMhcl bo« na»« bttn mj« l>« FilSt-QlSS Wrjrtal 



JMIUBCROF lM[CICA«M*«£r<3'1limm»!IOIUl Union CM Anuncj. <n OfMIMMcw devoted to the ad 

MIT " 
JWOMlIM 
All lAlnngsmaau upon tins ub*l mil be pejevihed according to law 



vdnctmml of lice MOBAl MATlRIAlitid INIUUCIWI WUIARt Of TUf CfiAfl 
tnese Ciga's to an smoke's ihrouonoyi cnt My»j 



Y- W ^Uk>tn4, ftrsxiera. 
' c »r i u ■> 



C if I V ofAmmc, 



PATRONIZE UNION INDUSTRY 

SHOKE UNION-MADE CIGARS THAT BEAR 
THE ABOVE LABEL 



(Otherwise known as SAM.) 

808 THIRD STREET 

Between King and Berry Sts., San Francisco. 

GENTS', YOUTHS' AND BOYS* CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises. Bags, etc., Roots, 
Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing of all kinds. Everything strictly 
UNION MADE. Seamen's outfits a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the lowest market price give me a call. 
Do not make a mistake— LOOK FOR THE NAME AND NUMBER. 



Taylor's Nautical School 




506 



BATTERY STREET 

COB. WASHINGTON ST. 



U P S Custom House SAN FRANCISCO 



Oldest School on Pacific Coast, Largest 
and best equipped private Nautical School 
in the United States. Graduates prepared 
for the American and British Merchant 
Marine Examinations. Warrant oillcers of 
the United States Navy prepared for ex- 
amination for commissioned officers. Spec- 
ial course for cadets entering the United 
States Naval Academy and American Mer- 
chant Marino. 

Taylor's Modern Navigation, a book for 
both young and old navigators, is now in 
the Library of every Pacific Mall Steam- 
ship, in many Universities, and is highly 
recommended by many noted navigators. 
Send for circulars and testimonials. 



Doubling 
Room 

DOWNSTAIES NOW 

Come an.i sec how the carpenter! 
ore tearing down— £ot a greater build- 
ing up. 

Extra values in househelpa for you 
to share. Savings to more than re- 
pay you for your trip. 



Bi g the children to see the 
wireless telegraph operated on the 
third floor, in charge <if Francis 
McCarthy, the boy inventor <>f the 
a in I, ss telephone. Demonstra- 
tions 10 In I . J a. m. and 2 to 5 
p. m. 



000000001 

Open at 9. Closed at 6 every day. 

MARKET ST., NEAR SIXTH 
San Francisco 



Union 
Clothing Store 

A COMPLETE STOCK OF 

Sailors' and Firemen's Clothing 
and General Supplies. 



ERNEST COLBY 

17^2 Steuart Street, 
Bet. Market & Mission, San Francisco 




Lyons 

Thelargest first class 
tailoring establishment 

on the Pacific Coast 
usln 



this 



Gi£P=g&T*'ioig 



IBS. 



label 



Suits to'order 
from $|(5 00 up 

Trousers to order 
from$gOO up 

Samples and Self Measurement Blanks 
free by mail 

&CHARLES I,YO\S 
\t LondonTailor (1 
T2I Market £122 Kearny s? 



SCOTTY'S MILWAUKEE 
SWEATERS & JACKETS 

Have stood the test against all 
compel i tors. 

Lake Faring Men All Know It. 

SWEATERS SENT BY 
MAIL FOR 33.00 
Beware of Imitations. 

WILLIAM LISLE 

"SCOTTTT" 

lit Menomenee St., Milwaukee, Wii. 




for the seafaring people of the world. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



Vol. XTX. No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1905. 



Whole No. 942. 



SEAMEN AND LONGSHOREMEN. 



Causes of Dispute Reviewed. 

Facts and Argument of the Case. 

THE "jurisdiction" dispute between the Inter- 1. The designations, "Seamen 

national Seamen 's Union of America and the 
International Longshoremen 's Association has 
become a matter of immediate concern to the 
labor movement of the country. Upon the manner 
in which that dispute is finally settled will depend the 
disposition of the ' ' jurisdiction ' ' question generally, 
and the whole course of the labor movement. 

The importance of the question demands that ev- 
ery means be exhausted to find and present the facts 
in the case, not only for the guidance of the princi- 
pals to the controversy, but also for the benefit of 
the whole membership of organized labor. Accord- 
ingly the Journal presents the following statement 
of the case. It will be said, of course, that this 
statement is ex parte — the statement of one side only. 
To this point we would reply by assuring the reader 
that the facts herein stated are matters of record, and 
therefore capable of documentary proof by the of- 
ficial records of both sides. As to the soundness of the 
reasoning and arguments used in connection with the 
facts, the reader must judge for himself. We feel 
confident, however, that, the facts being proved, the 
conclusions that naturally follow are so plain as to leave 
no room for question. In any event, we pledge our- 
selves to make an honest and complete presentation 
of the subject ; to say or suggest nothing unfairly 
prejudicial to one side or beneficial to the other, and 
to leave nothing unsaid that is necessary to full un- 
derstanding and impartial judgment. A good case 
needs neither cloak nor bolster. 

THE FACTS OF THE CASE. 

As is generally known, the dispute between the 
Seamen and the Longshoremen arises primarily 
through the action of the latter in changing their 
name from International Longshoremen 's Association 
to "International Longshoremen, Marine and Trans- 
port Workers ' Association. ' ' This change of name, 
implying, as it does, a change in jurisdiction, is ob- 
jected to by the Seamen. The Seamen, being both 
marine and transport workers, regard the change of 
name by the Longshoremen as an attempt by the 
latter to extend jurisdiction over the former. This 
attempt, in turn, is regarded as a direct menace to 
the existence of the International Seamen 's Union of 
America. Upon these grounds the Seamen have upon 
every possible occasion appealed to the highest au- 
thority in the labor movement — the American Federa- 
tion of Labor — for such protection as that body may 
be able to afford, specifically for a declaration requir- 
ing the Longshoremen to discontinue the "long name." 
So far, the total result of that appeal is signified by 
the refusal of the American Federation of Labor to 
recognize the "long name." It is proper at this 
time to point out that the Boston convention of the 
Federation made a flat declaration on the subject, in 
line with the appeal of the Seamen, but that declara- 
tion ha3 produced no effect upon the situation. Prac- 
tically, therefore, the case stands as at first. The 
Longshoremen continue to use the "long name" and 
to assert the claims thereby implied. 

Accordingly, the International Seamen's Union of 
America still insists that the American Federation of 
Labor shall formally declare against the use of the 
title, "International Longshoremen, Marine and 
Transport Workers ' Association, ' ' and enforce such 
declaration to the utmost extent of its power. The 
Seamen base their appeal for this action upon the 
following grounds: 



and ' ' Long- 
shoremen, ' ' APPEARING IN THE RESPECTIVE CHARTERS 

of these organizations, carry with them a uni- 
versally accepted understanding of the jurisdic- 
tion respectively granted, that of the seamen 
extending over all men employed in any capac- 
ity as members of the crew of any vessel; that 
of the Longshoremen extending over all men 
employed exclusively in the work of loading and 
unloading vessels, where the crews are not em- 
ployed in such work, or in assisting the latter 
when they are so employed. 

2. In 1902, the International Longshoremen's 
Association, in its convention, adopted the title, 
"International Longshoremen, Marine and 
Transport Workers' Association," with the ex- 
press AND DECLARED PURPOSE OF "EXTENDING THEIR 

jurisdiction" and "gathering in allied crafts." 

3. The jurisdiction which it is thus proposed 
to embrace includes that previously granted to 
the Seamen by the terms of the latters' char- 
ter, AND THE ' ' ALLIED CRAFTS ' ' WHICH IT IS THUS 
PROPOSED TO "GATHER IN" INCLUDE A NUMBER OF 
MARITIME CRAFTS WHICH RIGHTFULLY AND NECES- 
SARILY COME UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE INTER- 
NATIONAL Seamen's Union of America. 

4. In PURSUANCE OF THE CLAIMS SET UP BY THE 

Longshoremen under their assumed title, the 
Longshoremen 's local unions in various ports 
have declared their refusal to work with mem- 
bers of certain local unions of the internation- 
AL Seamen's Union of America, thus in some in- 
stances FORCING THE LATTER OUT OF EMPLOYMENT 

at their proper calling. 

5. The refusal of the Longshoremen to work 
with the Seamen, while ostensibly based upon 
the allegation that the latter, when engaged 
in loading or discharging vessels, are performing 
Longshoremen 's work, is in fact an attack upon 
the Seamen's rights and duties under the mari- 
time LAW, WHICH RIGHTS AND DUTIES BOTH THE SEA- 
MAN AND HIS EMPLOYER ARE MUTUALLY BOUND BY 
LAW TO RESPECT AND DISCHARGE. 

G. These actions on the part of the Long- 
shoremen CONSTITUTE A GRAVE MENACE TO THE AU- 
TONOMY of the International Seamen 's Union 
of America, and will, if permitted to continue, 
either by tacit consent of the american federa- 
TION of Labor or by inability on the part of the 
Seamen to defend them ski. ves, result in the ul- 
timate DESTRUCTION OF THE INTERNATIONAL SEA- 
MEN 's Union, or in its absorption by the organi- 
zation OF another and separate craft, which al- 
ternative WOULD RESULT IN THE DESTRUCTION OF 

the Seamen's hopes of protection and improve- 
ment. 



7. The American Federation of Labor, at its 
three last conventions has refused to recognize 
the new title assumed by the Longshoremen, not- 
withstanding which fact the latter have contin- 
ued to use said title and to usurp the authority 
thereby implied, in pursuance of their declared 
determination to ignore the rights of the Sea- 
men and the rulings of the American Federation 
of Labor. 

"seaman" and "longshoreman" defined. 

These grounds may be considered separately and in 
the order here set forth. By law and custom, as these 
prevail everywhere among maritime peoples, the term 
"seaman" is understood to mean a man who works 
on the sea, without respect to particular classes of men 
or particular classes of sea, or water. Thus the marine 
fireman or marine cook is as much a seaman as is the 
so-called able-seaman or deckhand. Similarly, the man 
employed on a vessel on the Great Lakes, the rivers or 
inland waters, is as much a seaman as is the man em- 
ployed on the ocean-going vessel. Specific names, such 
as "sailor," "fireman," "cook," etc., are used 
merely as a convenience in common language for the 
identification of individuals, not as conveying a sense 
of differentiation as between crafts. 

On the other hand, the meaning of the term ' ' long- 
shoreman" is equally clear and equally well under- 
stood, as descriptive of a man who works along the 
shore, specifically as a man who loads and unloads 
vessels. Wherever the longshoreman is found his 
identity is clearly recognized as that of a man whose 
work consists in transferring freight, as distinguished 
from the work of transporting it. That is to say, the 
longshoreman transfers freight from one vehicle of 
transportation to another, as from a railroad car or 
truck to a ship, or vice versa. The fact that a long- 
shoreman may break out, atow or sling freight on 
hoard ship does not constitute him a marine worker, 
any more than such action constitutes him a seaman, 
nor than his action in loading or unloading a truck or 
a railroad ear constitutes him a teamster or a railroad- 
man. The Longshoremen attempt to justify their 
claims by the invention of a strained and sophistical 
classification of the term "seaman." In a brief sub- 
mitted to the Executive Council of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, at its meeting of March 13-18, 1905, 
t lie Longshoremen say: 

"For example, we have avoided the word 'sailor' 
or 'seaman', or anything that would seem to carry the 
idea of confounding any person, or the public in 
eral, with the thought that our organization embraced 
t lie 'man before the mast.' " 

That the foregoing is an attempt to confuse the 
issue — to create artificial distinctions — may be seen 
by reference to the United States law on the subject. 
The term "seaman" is comprehensively defined in 
Section 4612, Revised Statutes, as follows: 

"In the construction of this Title (R. S., 4501- 
4613), every person having command of any vessel be- 
longing to any citizen of the United States shall be 
deemed to be the 'master' thereof; and EVERY PER- 
SON (apprentices excepted) who shall be employed 
or engaged to serve in any capacity on board the 
same shall be deemed and taken to be a 'seaman'; 
and the term 'vessel' shall be understood to compn 
bend every description of vessel navigating 
op any sea or channel, lake or river, to which the pro- 
visions of this Title may be applicable, and the term 
'owner' shall be taken and understood to comprehend 
.ill the several persons, if more than one, to whom the 
vessel shall belong." 

Tims we find, upon the best possible authority, that 
every person, (master and apprentices excepted) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



employed or engaged (that is, as members of the crew) 
to serve ix ANY CAPACITY is a "seaman." The 
attempt of the Longshoremen to make it appeal that 
the latter term is confined to the "man before the 
mast" is ridiculous, and argues either gross ignorance 
of the subject, 01 a wanton contempt for ordinary in- 
telligence. 

PROOF OF LONGSHOREMEN'S DESIGNS. 

Concerning the motive of the Longshoremen in 
changing the title of their organization, it is sufficient 
to quote the records of the convention at which the 
change was made. At that convention, held in Chi- 
cago, 111., duly 1419, 1902, a number of resolutions 
were introduced looking to a change of title, each of 
which was so worded as to convey an understanding 
thai the terms used referred to separate and distinct 
crafts or callings. In the official proceedings of the 
convention (page 152) appears the following, in con- 
aection with the resolution finally adopted: 

"This resolution brought forth a good deal of dis- 
cussion by many of the delegates. It was clearly dom- 
trated by the arguments presented that this was 
the important resolution of the convention. 

retary Barter occupied the floor for nearly one 
hour, telling of the progress of the Association since 
its formation, and pointed out THE NECESSITY of 

EXPANDING THE JURISDICTION OF OUR ASSOCIATION AS 
WELL AS BROADENING THE NAME OF OUR ASSOCIATION. 

Stated that the time had come when we must favor 
or reject the question of c han g ing the name of our 
Delation. If we were desirous of progressing it was 
ssary that the name be changed and the STYLE of 
on; ORGANIZATION BE BROADENED. If the reverse was to 
be the will of the convention our Association would 
retrograde, lie was in hopes that the resolution aa 
presented by Delegate Joyce would be adopted in its 
cut irety. 

It is quite evident from the foregoing that the 
Longshoremen acted with the express purpose of "ex- 
panding the jurisdiction * * as well as 
broadening the name" of their organization. Numer- 
ous other evidences of the same nature are contained 
in the official proceedings of the Longshoremen. For 
instance, Secretary Barter, in his report to the con- 
vent hm at which the change was made, spoke as fol- 
lows: 

"A brilliant future is assured for our Association 
if we are wise enough to prepare foi it. 1 again 
Strongly recommend the advisability of extending 

THE .JURISDICTION OF OUR ASSOCIATION TO GAIN CON- 
TROL OF ALL LABOR ENGAGED IN THE MARITIME AND 
.SPORT INDUSTRY. IT IS NECESSARY THAT WE 
BEACH OUT AND GATHER ALLIED INTERESTS, SO THAT 
INSTEAD OF SEVERAL ORGANIZATIONS STRUGGLING FOR 
BETTER THINGS. THERE SHALL BE BUT ONE UNIFIED 
BODY, UNDER WHOSE DIRECTION MARITIME AND TRANS- 
PORT WORKERS SHALL OPERATE. 

The opportunities for growth are bright with golden 
promise. We have but to stand to straight business 
methods, wateli every chance and take instant advan- 
tage of it SB it arises, and the Association must in time 
become the largest International Trade Union on this 
continent. Every ship that plows the inland seas, 

OR FURROWS THE WATERS OF THE WIDER OCEANS THAT 
WASH THE ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC PORTS SOUTHWARD 
K) THE 1,1'I.F, MUST EVENTUALLY DIP ITS FLAG TO OUR 
ASSOCIATION. We ARE THE TRUE MONARCH S OF THE 
SEAS. AT OUR BEHEST THE GREYHOUNDS OK THE OCEANS, 
AND THE ELVERS OF THE LAKES ARE STAYED IN THEIR 
IGBESS OR SPEEDED ON THEIR COURSES. WE HOLD 
THE BALANCE EVEN. WE REGULATE UNFAIR CONDITIONS. 

We redress injustice. By the might of our right 

WE MAKE RIGHT MIGHT, AND IN PLACE OF FOSTERING 
ANTAGONISMS, WE PROMOTE GOOD WILL AND PEACE." 

These official declarations, and others of the same 
r made at subsequent conventions, leave no 
doubt as to the designs of the Longshoremen. It is 
clearly the intention of the latter, not only to "gath- 
er in 'allied interests.' but in fact to form an indus- 
trial association which shall be monarch not alone of 
the seas, but of everything it surveys. It is signifi- 
cant, in this connection, to note the explanation re- 
cently offered by tic- Longshoremen to the Executive 
Council of the American Federation of Labor, in which 
it is stutcd thai the new title was not intended to im- 
ply any change in the character of the organization, 
but uas merely intended to more explicitly describe the 
organization as it then existed. To quote the state- 
ment in question: "We coined the word that when 
universally understood would properly classify all ma- 
rine workers, without encroaching upon the distinc- 
tively or commonly known trades or callings." In 
other words, the Longshoremen proposed to classify 
within their own ranks all marine workers, excepting 
only the "man before the mast." The weakne- 
this obvious after-thought confirms, rather than dis- 
proves, thi charge that the change of title was part of 
a pre determined and avowed plan to extend the jur- 
isdiction of the International Longshoremen's Associa- 
t ion. 

BASIS OF TRADE-UNION'S FOWER. 

That the jurisdiction which the Longshoremen pro- 
pose to embrace includes that of the Seamen, and 

that the "allied crafts" which the Longshoremen pro- 
to "gather in" include a number which right- 
fully come under the jurisdiction of the International 
Seamen's Union of America, may be seen by a brief 
consideration of the construction and purposes of the 
trade-union. Workers in a given trade organize 
su that they may be able to control the operation of 
that trade. To the extent that this object is accom- 
plished the trade-union is enabled to secure just con- 
t employment, since only by granting these 
Conditions Can the trade be operated. The trade- 
union is proportionately weak and inefficient to the 
extent that the given" trade can be carried on inde- 



pendently of its will in the matter of conditions of 
employment. It makes no difference whether the 
ability of the employer to carry on work is due to 
lack of organization in the given trade or to lack of 
concert between the organizations of two or more dif- 
ferent trades; the result is the same, namely, the work 
goes on, and the strike, if one takes place, is broken. 
Coming now to the case of organization among sea- 
men, the first thing to be noted is that the ship, or 
vessel of any kind, upon which seamen are employed 
is designed primarily, and in fact solely, for the pur- 
pose of transporting freight and passengers. The 
work of loading and unloading the vessel is incidental 
to the purpose of transportation. Therefore it is es- 
sential that a trade-union of seamen must be so organ- 
ized as to control the operation, i. e., the movement, 
of the vessel. In order to exercise this control every 
seaman on a given vessel must be organized under a 
single authority. The Longshoremen are kind enough 
to grant to the Seamen jurisdiction over the "man be- 
fore the mast," but claim for themselves jurisdiction 
over the marine firemen and other classes of maritime 
labor. Obviously, this is a very small favor, amount- 
ing, in effect, to a proposal to divide a ship's crew 
against itself. In steam vessels the power of the fire- 
man is co-equal with that of the "man before the 
mast "in the all-important matter of moving the vessel. 
A vessel manned in the fire-room by men acting under 
authority of the Longshoreman could be, and doubtless 
would be, moved as soon as she was loaded or discharg- 
ed. Consequently, the movement of the vessel would 
be controlled by consideration of the longshoremen 's 
conditions, regardless of the conditions of the sea- 
man. The "man before the mast" might strike, but 
his strike would be likely to prove abortive the mo- 
ment the vessel pulled away from the dock. In such 
case the Longshoremen would indeed be the "true 
monarch's of the seas, "while the seamen would be mere- 
ly so many subjects, or rather serfs, compelled to ac- 
cept whatever pittance might remain when the fruits 
of maritime transportation had been divided between 
the "monarchs, " and their employers, the shipowners. 
The plan of organization pursued by the Longshore- 
men has for its real object a division of the seafaring 
craft in order the better to aggrandize the longshore 
craft. As in the fable of the monkey who "divided" 
the cheese among the cats, by the process of nibbling 
a piece off each share in order to "equalize" them, 
the Longshoremen would "divide" the profits of the 
shipping business by swallowing the larger part them- 
selves and leaving the balance to be fought for by Sea- 
men and shipowners. 

MEASURES OF OFFENSE AND DEFENSE. 

Notwithstanding the declarations of the Longshore- 
men, that they do not propose to embrace the "man 
before the mast" in their scheme of "gathering in al- 
lied crafts," they have formally announced their re- 
fusal to work with the latter individual, thus practical- 
ly asserting a claim to jurisdiction over the work prop- 
erly belonging to and commonly performed by the lat- 
ter. Proof of this attitude is contained in the fol- 
lowing resolution, adopted by the convention of the 
Pacific Coast Branch of the International Longshore- 
men's Association, held at Astoria, Or., June 6-9, 
1904: 

"Whereas, The Sailors' Union of the Pacific per- 
mit their members to work on foreign-going vessels; 
and 

Whereas, Such action on the part of the seamen is 
detrimental to all Longshore locals handling and load- 
ing lumber; be it 

Resolved, That this convention notify all locals now 
working such vessels in conjunction with sailors to 
desist in the future and refuse to work with sailors 
on all foreign-going vessels." 

The intent and effect of this resolution was to de- 
prive the members of the Sailors ' Union of the Pacific 
of employment upon the vessels concerned. The own- 
ers of these vessels, being desirous of securing the 
prompt dispatch of their craft, discharged the sea- 
men and employed longshoremen in their places. In 
order to maintain its rights in the matter, the Sailors ' 
Union of the Pacific determined that, if necessary, 
its members should do all the work of loading, both 
on the vessels and on the docks. This determination 
was reached by a general vote on the following resolu- 
tion: 

' ' Whereas, The third annual convention of the Pa- 
cific Const Branch of the International Longshore- 
men's Association, held at Astoria, Or., June 6 to 9, 
inclusive, adopted a resolution declaring that 'mem- 
bers of Longshore unions refuse to work with sailors 
doing longshore work on foreign vessels'; and 

Whereas, In so far as the resolution here cited is in- 
tended to operate against the members of any ves- 
sel's crew (or substitutes employed temporarily in 
place thereof) while engaged in any capacity in con- 
nection with the handling of cargo, on board ship, it 
is calculated to work a denial of the seaman 's right 
to all work done 'inside the rail,' and is consequent- 
ly an infringement upon the legitimate interests of 
the seaman ; therefore be it 

Resolved, By the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, that 
members of this Union hereby declare their insistence 
at all times upon the right to perform any and all 
kinds of labor, including handling cargo, inside the 
rail, without hindrance or objection upon the part of 
any other organization; further 

Resolved, That the members of this Union also de- 
clare their determination to take such steps as may 
be necessary in any case to insure the prompt dispatch 
of vessels affected by the conditions herein named." 

This action was taken by the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific as a simple measure of self-defense, necessitat- 
ed by the refusal of the Longshoremen 's local unions 
to recognize the former's right to employment upon a 
class of work within the rightful jurisdiction of the 
Seamen. 



SEAMAN'S RIGHTS AND DUTIES. 

Passing to the question of tie- Seamen's right to 
work cargo on board ship, which work the Longshore- 
men claim for themselves, on the ground that it is 
"longshore work," it is important to note the law on 
the point. We have already referred to the United 
states Revised Statutes (Sec. 4612) by way of ex- 
plaining the legal meaning of the term "seaman." 
The same section defines the seaman's duties, as fol- 
lows : 

"And the said crew agree to conduct themselves 
in an orderly, faithful, honest and sober manner, and 
to be at all times diligent in their respective duties, 
and to be obedient to the lawful commands of the said 
master, or of any person who shall lawfully succeed 
him. and of their superior officers in everything re- 
lating TO THE VESSEL, AND THE STORES AND 
THEREOF, WHETHER ON BOARD, IN BOATS OR ON SHORE." 

In accordance with this definition, the seaman may 
In' ordered to work cargo, and upon his refusal to 
obey, he may be, and in fact is, punished by fines, 
forfeitures and imprisonment. In order to under- 
stand this phase of the question it is necessary to con- 
sider it in the light of historical growth. Originally 
the seaman performed all the work of loading and dis- 
charging the vessel. As the size of vessels increased 
and crews became relatively smaller particular classes 
of work were relegated to particular (lasses of work- 
men. Among the latter classes there came into exist- 
ence a class of men whose business it was to help the 
seaman in loading and discharging cargo, in order that 
the vessel might have quicker dispatch. Thus ire note 
the genesis of the longshoreman. 

The claim of the uongshoremen, that the work of 

loading and discharging vessels is "longshore work" 
holds good only so far as regards that part of such 
work as is performed on the shore, or deck, and even 
in that regard the claim is based more upon the cus- 
tom prevailing in certain ports than upon any inherent 
virtue. It is not true,as the Longshoremen say, that the 
work of loading and discharging vessels is customarily 
performed by longshoremen, to the exclusion of the 
vessels' crews. For the greater part, such work is per- 
formed exclusively by the vessels' crews, and, for the 
test, the crews are employed in such work to tie- ex- 
tent of their numbers, assisted by longshoremen where 
such assistance is deemed necessary for the prompt 

tch of vessels. 

"UNITED WE STAND; DIVIDED WE FALL 

We come now to the menace offend by the Long- 
shoremen in their claims to jurisdiction over thi 
men's calling. The Longshoremen point to the fact 
that only on the Pacific Coast do the crews of 
perform what they (the Longshoremen) are phased 
to call "longshore work." The Seamen may very 
well reply by pointing to the fact that only on the 
Pacific Coast have they been able to establish and 
maintain, for any considerable period, an efficient or- 
ganisation. These facts constitute more than a mere 
coincidence; they are related as cause and effect. The 
Seamen^ right to work cargo on the vessel, and the 
exercise of that right, implies continuous employment. 
This one condition explains the fact that the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific has been able to accomplish more 
for its members and the seafaring craft at large than 
any other similar organization in the world. The 
Longshoremen's suggestion that the Seamen shall sur- 
render the rights now enjoyed and exercised by their 
members on the Pacific Coast is simply an invitation to 
surrender the conditions that have made organization 
an effective factor in the affairs of the maritime craft. 
That suggestion, if adopted by the Seamen, would re- 
duce them to the precarious conditions that exist 
among the craft in certain other places, the character- 
istics of which are enforced idleness and consequent 
poverty', with their inevitable sequence of dependence 
upon the degrading crimping system. 

Experience, dearly bought through generations of 
suffering to which no other class of labor has been 
subjected, has taught the Seamen the full force of the 
maxim that "he who would be free, himself must 
strike the blow." Many well-meant efforts have been 
made by the "seamen's friends" to ameliorate the 
lot of the seafaring class, but without avail. The 
seaman has learned to help himself, and with that 
knowledge has come the conviction that only by asso- 
ciating himself with other members of his craft, and by 
preserving the organization thus created from internal 
Control or interference by members of other crafts, 
can he hope for present or future improvement. In a 
word, the Seamen have tested the principle of "trade- 
union autonomy," as contradistinguished from "in- 
dustrialism," ami proved it sound. For the main- 
tenance of that principle the Seamen are now contend- 
ing. The Longshoremen, on their part, are contend- 
ing for approval of their plan to form a federation, or 
"industrial" union, ostensibly in conformity with the 
laws of the American federation of Labor, but actu- 
ally and knowingly in defiance of these laws, and with 
the thinly disguised intention of creating an opposi- 
tion body which shall be not only "monarch of the 
seas," but also monarch, boss and despot id' the 
American labor movement. 

The facts herein set forth are irrefutable. Recog- 
nizing these facts, the American Federation of Labor 
can not do less than repudiate the assumption of the 
Longshoremen to jurisdiction over the Seamen, either 
as to tin- membership or as to the work that rightfully 
belongs to the hitter. Whatever attempts be made to 
confuse the issue, the truth stands out too clearly to 
permit of misapprehension by ordinary intelligence 

.lid comn conscience. The truth is in the mouths of 

in Longshoremen themselves, and it condemns them 
beyond the hope of redemption by resort to dust-rais- 
ing tact ics. 



Demand the union label on all products. 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



- -On the Atlantic Coast. — 

(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions.) 



New YorR's Water Traffic. 



For years past the citizens of New York 
City have at odd times made more or ]ess ef- 
fective attempts to stem the steady decline 
of the shipping of that port, but until quite 
recently no concerted movement to that end 
has been made. The causes of the decline 
are, briefly, railroad discriminations and ex- 
orbitant port charges, chief among which are 
the high dock rentals. So onerous have these 
imposts been that it is estimated that in the 
last twenty years fully thirty per cent of the 
port's commerce has been diverted to Boston, 
Philadelphia, Baltimore and Newport News. 
It is therefore proposed to unite under one po- 
litical banner all those who are directly in- 
terested in the commerce of New York, for 
the purpose of obtaining legislation that will 
remedy the evils complained of. Various 
maritime bodies have already rallied to the 
support of the movement, the most impor- 
tant in point of numbers being the "Long- 
shoremen's Independent Political Union." 
Their platform is as follows: 

First — That we will advocate the continuation of ex- 
tending our dock system as fast as it is possible to 
do so, until there is ample dock room for all shipping, 
at reasonable rates. 

Second — That the city shall not rent any of the new 
piers now building in that section of our water-front 
that lies between Whitehall and Koosevelt streets, on 
the East River, to railroad companies or steamship 
companies, but operate them according to law for the 
benefit of outside shipping, such as tramp steamers or 
irregular lines, as we believe it will bring back the 
activity that once prevailed along South street. 

Third — That the city shall provide a terminal or 
terminals for the new Barge Canal. 

Fourth — That the city shall build suitable buildings 
for men seeking employment at intervals around the 
port of New York. 

Fifth — That the city shall erect a series of drink- 
ing fountains around the port of New York. 

Sixth — That the city officials must enforce the law 
in regard to the water-front, and not permit railroad 
companies and steamship companies or any other par- 
ties to use the city's property as a storehouse. 

Seventh — That the city shall designate one dock out 
or every ten, to be known as a public dock, for the 
convenience of our local merchants, and erect thereon 
a shed for recreation purposes, such docks to be oper- 
ated according to law. 

Henry P. Griffin, General Secretary of the 
Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association, is 
Corresponding Secretary of the Longshore- 
men's Independent Political Union. Mr. 
Griffin was recently ordered by the organiza- 
tion to communicate with Mayor McClellan 
for the purpose of getting him to call a meet- 
ing of the Sinking Fund Commission, which 
has jurisdiction over the city's docks, and of 
which the Mayor is the head, so that the de- 
mands of the Longshoremen's Independent 
Political Union could be laid before that 
body. Instead of doing so, however, Mayor 
McClellan sent the following letter in reply : 
H P. Griffin, Esq., Cor. Secy. The Longshoremen's 

Ind. Political Union, 16C Christopher Street, New 

York: , , . 

Dear Sir — I have the honor to acknowledge your 
letter of October 13. It has been the policy of the 
present administration to develop the water-front and 
increase facilities for shipping, so as to invite new 
commerce to our port. To that end new piers have 
been constructed, and other water-front improvements 
have been projected. I am heartily in sympathy with 
every impulse of your organization to expand our dock 
system, and I shall be glad at all times to confer with 
those who are interested in the upbuilding of our 
water traffic, because I recognize, as- you do, that its 
development is of the highest importance to New York. 
I beg to invite your attention to the plank in the plat- 
f orrn adopted by the City Convention, which nominat- 
ed the ticket. It reads as follows: 

"We favor the maintenance of existing docks and 
the building of new ones ample in extent to meet all 
the requirements of oversea trade, as essential to the 
continuance of New York's position as the commercial 
metropolis of the New World. We also favor such a 
reduction in the dock charges, imposed by the Jusion 
administration, as will relieve trade, and invite, rather 



than repel, foreign commerce, while safeguarding the 
city treasury." 

I trust that I have made my position on this sub- 
ject entirely clear. Yours very truly, 

GEO. B. McCLELLAN, 

Mayor. 

The Longshoremen's Independent Political 
Union is not satisfied with the more diplo- 
matic than direct reply of Mayor McClellan, 
so it is proposed to sound the nominees for 
Mayor on the other two city tickets, and to 
pledge the support of the organization to the 
one who makes the most liberal concessions to 
the demands for an improved dock system. 
It is believed that the organization has enough 
voters among its members to throw the elec- 
tion to whichever side it thinks deserving of 
its support. 



" Giant Waves." 



The recent accident to the Cunard liner 
Campania, caused by a "giant wave," which 
washed overboard six of her passengers, and 
injured thirty or forty more, has raised a con- 
troversy among the nautical sharps on some 
of the newspapers about the existence or non- 
existence of such waves. The nautical editor 
of the New York Times, for instance, pooh- 
poohs the theory of "giant waves," and, in 
effect, ascribes the mishap to the Campania, to 
what may be termed a failure on the part of 
that vessel to make the proper connection with 
the sea that swept her decks. This hypothesis 
may be correct in this particular case, but it 
is well known to seamen that in almost every 
great storm at sea there is sure to be one wave, 
and sometimes three consecutive waves, so 
much greater in volume than the others as to 
make it a truly awesome spectacle, as well as 
more than ordinarily dangerous. It usually 
makes its appearance during the height of the 
gale, and its mountain-like ridge can be seen 
for miles to windward towering above the 
crests of the other waves. A shipmaster who 
knows his business will always prepare to 
meet one of these big waves in such a manner 
that the vessel may receive the least damage 
from the impact. On sighting the wave the 
vessel, if a steamer, should be immediately 
slowed down so as to give her barely steerage- 
way, and headed up to take the oncoming 
wave about two or three points on the bow, 
and the engines stopped entirely a minute or 
so before the expected impact. Similarly, in 
a sailing vessel lying to, everything should be 
done to at once bring her head as close to the 
wind as possible. If she carries a fore-top- 
mast staysail, it should be hauled down, even 
if it should be blown to ribbons. A tarpaulin 
should be run up in the mizzen rigging, and 
the helm, if hard a Ice at the time, should be 
eased, as this often has a tendency to tem- 
porarily help the vessel head up in the wind. 
In a sailing vessel running before the wind 
there is nothing else to do but keep her as 
"dead" before it as she can be steered and 
order all hands to a place of safety, prefer- 
ably up in the rigging. In all cases, passen- 
gers should be kept below. Even with every 
possible precaution, a vessel seldom escapes 
without damage from an encounter with one 
of these monster waves. 



Mongolian Servants. 

It is a curious fact that some of the most 
atrocious suggestions which appear in the 
newspapers for the industrial betterment of 
society invariably pretend to be actuated by 
a pro-bono-publico spirit. Dr. Johnson un- 
doubtedly had something like this in mind 
when he said that "patriotism is the last ref- 
uge of a scoundrel." A little while ago the 
New York Times contained two editorials, 
headed respectively, "The Competition of 
Japan," and "The Servant-Girl Problem." 
The former dealt with the cheapness of Jap- 
anesese labor, and the latter with the dearness 
of American domestic help. A party who 
signed himself, "A Friend of All Classes," 
thereupon wrote to the editor of the Times 
that the two aforesaid editorials "answered 
each other," and continued as follows: 

So long as the demand for any article is greater 
than the supply the price will be exorbitant. Hence 
the high wages of unskilled servants. It is well known 
that the service of the Japanese and Chinese laborers 
is the best in the world, and while we are refusing to 
permit their emigration to this country we must suffer 
for it. There is no need of admitting the criminal and 
opium-eating classes, but it would surely be for the 
benefit of all employers and of every household to ad- 
mit all others. Then householders could have skilled 
service for reasonable wages, both in country and 
city, all over the land. Farmers would have plenty of 
laborers in garden and field. The millowners plenty 
of hands, who would work instead of striking. There 
is no labor so skilled, both indoors and outdoors, so 
teachable, as that of these Eastern nations, and yet we 
willingly deprive ourselves of it, yielding to the out- 
cry of our ignorant European laborers, who are jeal- - 
ous of its admission to the United States because it 
would cut down the extortion of their own wages. 

No one but a person capable of writing 
such frothy, senseless flapdoodle as that 
would have the nerve to style himself "A 
Friend of All Classes." Comment upon the 
stuff itself would be superfluous; but it is sig- 
nificant that the New York Times editorial 
policy seems to invite such pro-Mongolian and 
anti-Caucasian effusions from its admiring 
readers. There is a good deal of truth, after 
all, in Cervantes' philosophy that "a man 
(and a newspaper) may be known by the 
company he keeps." 



Work I'm- the Initiative and Referendum 
principle of Legislation ! 



President Roosevelt's latest "Executive 
order," that any employe in the public de- 
partments at Washington may be instantly 
dismissed for "misconduct or inefficiency," 
without a hearing or the right of appeal, 
comes with exceedingly bad grace from the 
chief exponent and apostle of the doctrine of 
the "Square Deal." This order practically 
makes the head of every public department a 
little Caesar, and if the people permit this 
sort of thing to go on unchecked the time will 
inevitably come when there will be a Caesar 
instead of a public servant in the White 
House. The President already has more Execu- 
tive power than many of Europe's crowned 
heads, and the snobs among us think Hint lie 
should be invested with still more. His latest 
"Executive order" will tend to make more 
snobs, for how can a man retain his independ 
ence of character when his official head is at 
the mercy of an individual executioner? 



Jefferson would turn in his grave if he 
could hear some of the "Democrats" who are 
to-day quoting him in justification of their 
' 'democracy. ' ' 



(Continued on page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Home News. 



Representative Bereno Payne has de- 
clared in favor of free trade between the 
United States and the Philippines. 

Senator Proctor will introduce a bill 
into the approaching Congress calling 
for the restoration of the canteen at 
Army posts. 

The new rule of the Agricultural De- 
partment, requiring beef packers to pay 
the cost of inspection labels, was put into 
effect on November 1. 

Owing to the scarcity of hides the price 
of shoes in Chicago is shortly expected to 
be higher than at any time within tin- 
last forty years. 

A recent Presidential order gives to 
Cabinet members the right of peremptory 
dismissal from the service despite Civil 
Service regulations. 

President Roosevelt has issued a proc- 
lamation forbidding the exportation of 
all munitions of war from the United 
States and Porto Rico to San Domingo. 

Isham Randolph, a member of the 
board of consulting engineers of the 
Panama Canal, has declared his belief 
that the work will be completed in ten 
years. 

Company C, National Guard of Cali- 
fornia, located at Nevada City, was mus- 
tered out of the service on October L'(i 
or failing to meet the Federal require- 
ments for efficiency. 

Clarence A. Powers, head of the bank- 
ing firm of C. A. Powers & Co., of Chi- 
cago, ill., was arrested recently, charged 
with buying $400 worth of stamps stolen 
from a jewelry firm. 

Secretary of War Taft will recommend 
to Congress an increase in the number of 
the artillerymen in the Army in order 
that there shall be a sufficient number of 
men to man the forts and care for the 
coast defenses. 

Secretary of War Taft has announced 
that he has no intention of res ign ing 
from the Cabinet to make a campaign 
for the Presidency, and, furthermore, 
that he has no intention whatever of 
making a campaign for the office of the 
nation's chief executive. 

A fire destroyed British Government 
property valued at $100,000 on George's 
Island, in the center of Halifax harbor, 
on October 27, and threatened to oblit- 
erate numerous masked batteries and 
magazines which constitute one of the 
most important groups of fortifications 
at that port. 

White Fraser and staff of surveyors. 
who have been working from the head 
of the Portland Canal delineating the 
new Alaskan boundary, returned to "Vic- 
toria, B. C, on October 27, having mark- 
ed forty miles of the line with bronze 
monuments on highlands and a trail 
through the timber. 

President Roosevelt has sent Inspector 
William .1. Hums, of the United States 
Secret Service, to Seattle, Wash., for the 
purpose of investigating alleged land 
frauds, similar to those committed in 
Oregon. It is said upon reliable author 
ity that seventy-five Government men are 
now at work in various parts of the 
State. 

Official information comes to the State 
Department from Nicaragua that the so- 
called Leon Court has confirmed the de- 
cision of the lower court in the case of 
the American citizen, Albers, and has 
fixed his sentence at thirty-two months' 
imprisonment. Albers will appeal to the 
Supreme Court at Managua. 

The report of the Pullman Palace Car 
Company for one year ended July 31 last 
showed a surplus after dividends and 
payments to car associations of $4,134,- 
572, an increase of $392,947. The total 
surplus is now $22,151,946, while the to- 
tal net assets are given as $96,151,846, 
an increase of $4,134,581 compared with 
the condition on July 31, 1904. The 
capital stock remains unchanged at $74,- 
000,000. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



BRILLIANT'S 

CLOTH I NG STOR E 
SAN PEDRO. CAL. 

We make a Specialty of Handling only the Best Goods Manufactured 

for Seamen. 

YOU WILL FIND THE UNION LABEL ON OUR GOODS ALSO. 



LIPPflAN BROS. 

CLOTHING AND SHOE STORE 

We Carry the Finest and Most Up-to-date makes 

of Union Made Goods 

WIEDWALD BLOCK, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD WINES AND 

LIQUORS. 

BOTTLERS OF SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES BEERS. 

All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. 

We buy direct from Kentucky Distilleries and our California Wineries. 

Seafaring men invited to inspect our stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN FEDRO, CAL. 



JOHN HELANDER 

Dealer In 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

Groceries, Provisions, Cigars 

Fourth Street, near Beacon, 
San Pedro, Cal. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO, 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Fedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Dos Angeles Examiner and all San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Daundry. 



J. P. SYLVA, Jr. 

Dealer in 

Groceries, Hay and Grain, also Green 

Fruits and Country Produce 

BEACON ST., bet. Fourth and Fifth. 
Phone No. 164. SAN FEDBO, CAL. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drags, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. MUNSON 

Dealer in 
CIOABS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front. Street, opposite S. F. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



FRED SVENDSEN 

UNION EXPRESS 

AND DRAY CO. 

STAND AT FRONT STREET 

SAN FEDBO, CAL. 



WHEN DRINKING BEER 



IliflttD 



iSScPJ 




>mm 



X>^ Of America r£> 

" x -^ TRADE MARK REGISTERED ^ — ' 



SEE THAT THIS LABEL 
IS ON THE KEG OR BOTTLE 



CIGAR AND TOBACCO STORE 

JACOB OLSEN, No. 324, Prop. 



THE BEST CIGARS IN TOWN. 



Store on Fourth Street, near Beacon, 
SAN FEDBO, CAL. 



SEASIDE MARKET 

CAPTAIN McVICAE and B. L. BAAND 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Beef, Pork, Mutton and Sausages of all Kinds 

Meats Inspected by U. S. Inspectors. 

FBONT STBEET, SAN FEDBO, CAL. 

Vessels Supplied at Lowest Rates. 

Telephone 203. 



UNION CIGAR AND 
TOBACCO STORE 

- ELIAS WIBEEB, Proprietor. 
Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 
SAN FEDBO, CAL. 

Union-Made Clears, Tobaccos, Pipes, 
Notions, Etc. 



PEOPLE'S BARGAIN STORE 

Headquarters for UNION MADE CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing 1 Goods, Boots and 

Shoes, Hats and Caps, Sailors' 

Outfits. 

M. LEVY, Proprietor. 

Ent., Front and Beacon Sts., San Fedro. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 
Undertaker and Embalmer 

FOURTH ST. 
Bet. Front & Beacon Sts., San Pedro. 




UNION LxiBEL 



OF THE 



UNITED HATTERS 



OF N. A. 



,>cn| n f^y^M When you are buying a FUR HAT, either soft or 

■T^Trrrrllc.v stiff, see to It that the Genuine Union Label is sewed 
* , »lSTtri*' in it. The Genuine Union Label is perforated on the 

four edges exactly the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer has loose labels 
in his possession and offers to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize him. 
Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. Unprincipled manufacturers are 
using them In order to get rid of their scab-made hats. The John B. Stetson 
Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., Is a non-union concern. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, IT. J. 
MABTIN LAWLOB, Secretary, 11 Warerly Place, Boom 15, New Tork, V. T. 



LETTER LIST. 



SAN FEDBO, CAL. 

Andersen, Chas. a. Jurgensen, Wilhelm 

Andersen, .uiei p. Johannesen-1557 

Andersen, Alsel Karl son, Gus E. 

Andersen, Auel- Klahn, K 

1460 Knutsen, Knut 

Admand, I. Krietsamtn. Ferd. 

Andersson, E. Kronvall, Oskar 
Andreasen, Edward ammermans. \V. 
Anderron, A. E.-906 Kenris, Hans 

Anderron, A. J. I rehsman, Martin 

Anderron, A.-1055 Kauall, Erik 
Almsolonsen. Ole M. Kirstein, J.-62J 

Andersen-616 Koso, J.-590 

Andersen, A. B. Kahlbetzer, Fred 

Andersen, Joseph Knudsen il 

Anderson, Olaf Ko.ur, Paul 

Anderson, W. G. LaUelane, J..hn 

Anderson, s. Latitler, John 

Anderson. W.-991 Larsen. Louis-536 

.easen, N. S. Llndholm, Nestor 

Angelbeck, G. Lund, Charles-599 

Appelgren, John Lieman, Alkee 

Arkerlund-1263 Larsen, R< rt 

gorjerron, B. E, Lie. Carl?1042 

Bogan, Patrick Lund, Martin 

I -ran burg. A. G.- LindgviSt, Ernst 

,. ' "'"' . . t.uksie, F.-689 

Boyd, A.ndrew-1379 Lindholm, i: 

Blom, Chr. A. Lehtinen, A.-H91 

ekow, A. O. Larsen, Ed., Fhotos 

Bray, Join, K Maatta, John 

Bernard, Sandalla Magnussen-1147 



Buch, David 



McAdam, J. 



Bergerren, A. C. McHume! W. H. 

Booth, A. J Moore. James 

Bohman, Erik Michael, Walter 

nllowski Moritz Mikkelsson, Alfred 

£ , , h™>J- Mjornes. Arm- 

:'„ K \.,? U m i-J oen Nelson, Fran* 

Rubers ,Nils-989 No i son . Ju i ius 

j^uren, C. Nielsen. K. N. 

a, G.-Reg. let. Ni( ,,. son , N . G . 



P. O. 



Nielsen. Niels Chr. 



&in% J .it 8 o ssttsar^ 

Blanemo, Oscar e\i 

•;" l ; i V: '<;: Henry Nla isen-668 
Bregler, Eriedrich Sf&g^* 6 

:•::':::::: £% ggs»S&A 

Cheodore. Bodlou £ ^ ' af—J, 
Christensen. Harry £'*/"• ' Sl >1 '-',', 
Christiansen, Ludv. ^..^' n '"•.;'' 

Coffman. Milo ftls" fertk 78s 

Danielsen, Gustav 21???' fnjL 7 ! 8 

Ieimianie Wessan- Is,n - Jol,n B. 
,i m „ ' Alessan Olsen, Emil 

Davev (' ,,lson ' s - R 

l/i'ner. Alik 0{»f». B r " st „„ 

l,, |is j r r Olsen, Oscar-630 

Edson, Frank plavesn i Sv„ _ a 

n.l. J. A. Risen, Wm.-76J 

Eliason. K. A. Ohlsson. O 

Evensen, C-txi 1 erouwer G. 

Eriksen-639 Petersen, Chris. 

K.iksson-333 Pettonen, K II 

Fkluna s I'ctterson, Auel 
Ellingren.' Frithjof Pettersen, Olaf-982 

Kriksen. Martin Persson. 1! s.-.al 

Esper, Theodore Pedersen-896 

Fiitfstrom C K Pearson, Charles 

Preastad. 'Hans' E e i er I en ,", 90 A 

tndez. B. E ad ; s - V.-i,s 

Forstrom, H. Poulsen. M. P. 

Eorslander a Rasmussen, Adolph 

Poldat, John ' Rasmussen, Bdw. 

'.all. Johan F. Rasmussen. Victor 

Gunlach. John 5 o ?, ehman " r,0 L„ 

Oulbransen, And. 5? ld - J*™ 16 ?- 326 ,., 

GronberK. Erik Rjetad, S. J.-1355 

Goodmunden, Job's £ ud !- A. M.-677 

Graff. Ed. Rom. Erik 

Gustafson, J. -432 Reay. Stephen A. 

Gustafson, A. F. Rohde. Robert 

ifson, Oskar Rudolph. Fritz-Reg. 

Hansen, August m letter P. O. 

Kan sen J Sorensen, M. -Photo 

il,,,,,,. 'j on n Sorensen, C.-1684 

Heckman, Victor Svendsen, Christ 

Hubinette, E. N. Scholer, Edvin 

llaiiiff. Henry Stalsten. Karl 

Hellman, M. J. K. Schatze, Otto 

Ham. II. T. Saunders. Carl 

Hazel Wm Stokes, Charles 

Hausen, Harry Selzer. Matt 

Halberg, C. 11. Sinford, Mr. 

Hill, Frank Sands. Harry 

Hinze, August Smith. Henry 

Hakanssen, Fred"k Sundqulst, \v. W. 

Hansen. Hans S. Solberg. Bernt 

Hansen. Karl Skogsfjord, Olaf 

Hansen Samsio, S. 

Hansen, Laurits Bandon-1678 

Haraldsson-1204 Sanitone. J. 

Henrlksen. K. Smith, Pat. 

[mbola, Auk. Keg. Smith. Paul 

letter. Sodergvist, Otto 

[mbola, August strand. Ednar 
Ingi'bretsen. Haldor Svenssen. Hans M. 

Ingebretsen, Johan Bwanson, c. 

Jacobsen, Peder Torngvist. A. N. 

Jansson, A.-351 Tikander, T. M. 

.lansson. Edward J. Tomask. Math. 

Jut.-. .a. i tscar V'erbrugge, 1 ». 

Jeshke Hans Verzona, Fellz 

Johansen, E. H. Wahlstedt, A. R.- 
Johansen, E .W. 778 

.Johansen. Cunen Wahlman. J. -Reg. 
Johnson. Emil-1576 letter P. O. 
Jordan. C. Warren. \V. A. 

Johanssen-1428 Westergren, Carl 

Johans, Chas. Wahlstedt, Rafael 

Jorgensen, Th. VTeideman, Frank 

Jorgensen, Walter Wikstrom, W. 

Johansson, Charles \\ irtanen. Gustaf 

Jekke, Hans Warta, Arthur 

Johnsson, O. w. Wisbel, Joliannes 

Jensen. Julius L. Westerholm. Aug. 

Johannesen, Hana Wilson. Edward 

II Yves .Allaisu 

Jensen. Rasmus Yerna. Frank 

Jnrvinen. Karl G. Zugehaer, Alex. 

Johansson. Anders Zeidler. Fred 

Jorgensen, J. W. Zimmerman. Fritz 

Johnson. Otto Zlllmann, Hernhard 



ASTORIA, OR. 



COLUMBIA RIVER 

Fishermen's Protective Union 

Headquarters. Astoria, Or. 

H. M. LOBNTSEN, Secretary, 

P. O. Box 138. 

The Reading Room is open at all 

times to Members of the 

Sailors' Union. 



When making purchases from our adver- 
tisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



:£^S^~^£^£^£^j^£^^;^£^^'' :: ^- ,,:5:: ^' : »>.'' 



'^'^•^•^•^'^•^•^•^•^•<S7-£7t^Z? : *7^'^& 



Pacific Coast Marine, 






The steam-schooner Aurelia wa3 seriously damaged 
by the steamer Umatilla while the latter vessel was 
backing out from her slip at Broadway wharf No. 1, 
San Francisco, on October 27. 

The British bark Kilmallie, previously reported as 
putting into Montevideo while bound from Shields for 
Tacoma, Wash., had her ci.rgo shifted, and lost her 
wheel and steering gear while on the passage. 

The schooner Maid of Orleans, which sailed from 
San Francisco on September 6 for Saldova, Alaska, 
put into Port Townsend, in distress, after being a 
month and a half at sea. 

The Japanese steamer America Maru of the Toyo 
Kisen Kaisha line, arrived at San Francisco on Octo- 
ber 17 for the first time, after having served as an 
auxiliary cruiser in the Russo-Japanese war. 

A severe storm prevailed in Behring Sea for four 
days, ending October 15, according to advices received 
at Seattle, Wash. Vessels arriving at Nome have been 
compelled to seek shelter behind Sledge Island. 

The San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose Railroad, 
operating the Key Route ferryboats, has awarded a 
contract to John W. Dickie, of San Francisco, for the 
construction of a duplicate of the San Francisco. 

The British ship Wayfarer, at San Francisco on Oc- 
tober 14, 162 days from Hamburg, reports that a sea- 
man named V. Pettersen, aged 22 years, fell from 
aloft and was drowned in the English Channel. 

The steam-schooner Greenwood arrived at San Fran- 
cisco on October 21 with a cargo composed of machin- 
ery, deck-fittings, etc., saved from the wreck of the 
steamer St. Paul, on Point Gorda. 

The steamer F. A. Kilburn, damaged some weeks 
ago by going ashore near Coos Bay, and since repaired 
at Boole 's yard in Oakland, was given a trial trip on 
San Francisco Bay on October 22. 

A telegram received at San Francisco on October 21 
reported that the schooner Seven Sisters had gone 
ashore two miles north of Nome, and would probably 
be a total wreck. The schooner carried a cargo of ex- 
plosives. 

J. L. Camm and E. D. Hedges have been given 
judgment against the schooner Alaska in the libel 
brought by them and were awarded $694.05 damages 
by United States Commissioner Brown at San Fran- 
cisco. 

The investigation into the stranding of the Oceanic 
liner Alameda opened at San Francisco October 12, 
before Supervising Inspector of Steam Vessels Ber- 
mingham. The Inspectors have taken the ca3e under 
advisement. 

While crossing San Francisco Bay on October 25 the 
steam schooner Phoenix rammed the ferryboat Oak- 
land, tearing a large gap in the side of the latter just 
forward of the starboard wheel. The Phoenix suf- 
fered no damage. 

United States Commissioner J. S. Manley has filed 
his report in the District Court at San Francisco 
awarding to the California Stevedore and Ballast Com- 
pany $1616 for the loss of a barge by collision with 
the British bark Loch Throol. 

From Nantes, France, comes the information that 
the French bark Beaumanoir, previously reported, was 
towed into Suva, Fiji, partially dismasted, with the 
report that a hurricane experienced off New Caledonia 
was responsible for the damage. 

The German cruiser Falke, at San Francisco for the 
past month, is to go to the Mare Island Navy Yard 
this week to have her chains tested. She will remain 
at the Yard about a week, and will then proceed to 
sea, bound for the southern coast. 

The schooner Sacramento, from Suislaw, Or., on Oc- 
tober 14, for San Francisco, went ashore four miles 
north of Coos Bay on the following day. The crew 
were rescued by the Life-Saving Service, but vessel 
and cargo are a total loss. 

The Fishermen's Protective Union of the Pacific 
Coast and Alaska has petitioned the Federal Govern- 
ment to establish a marine hospital in the Bristol Bay 
(Alaska) region. The resolution has the indorsement 
of organized labor generally. 

Captain William Jones, accused of allowing an alien 
seaman afflicted with trachoma to escape from the 
British ship Burmah, was declared to be not guilty by 
Judge De Haven in the United States District Court 
at San Francisco on October 21. 

A telegram received at San Francisco on October 20 
reported that the steamer Valencia went ashore on the 
rocks at St. Michael on October 16. She was hauled 
off and two days later sailed for Seattle. The dam- 
age sustained is not known. 

The American ship Erskine M. Phelps was not 
ashore at Cavite during the recent typhoon, as at first 
reported, according to a telegram received at San Fran- 
cisco on October 20. The Phelps is now en route from 
Manila to Honolulu. 

The French bark Cambronne, 153 days out from 
Birkenhead for San Francisco, arrived off the Heads 
on October 17, and received orders to proceed to Port- 
land. For some days previously the vessel had been 
on the overdue board, with reinsurance quoted at 10 
per cent. 

The licenses of ten mates, pilots, masters and en- 
gineers at San Francisco were revoked on October 16 
by United States Steamboat Inspectors at Washing- 
ton, D. C. The action in each case was for the reason 
that their naturalization papers were obtained by 
fraud. 

The steamer Indianapolis sailed from Chicago, III., 
on October 25 for the Pacific Coast. The Indiana 
was purchased from the Indiana Transportation Com- 
pany by the Puget Sound Navigation Company for 
$160,000. The vessel will be put on the run between 
Seattle and Alaskan ports. 



The Pacific Coast Company has given instructions 
to its local drafting departments at Seattle, Wash., to 
prepare plans for the construction of a steamer to 
take the place of the Gypsy, which was recently 
wrecked. The new vessel will be much larger and a 
faster boat than the Gypsy. 

Agents J. D. Spreekels & Bros., who were fined $5000 
by the Treasury Department for failure to provide 
proper bills of health for the steamer Memphi, from 
Callao, Peru, had the penalty remitted on October 17 
through the recommendation to that effect of Collector 
of the Port F. S. Stratton. 

The steam-schooner Johan Poulson was launched at 
the White shipyards in Everett, Wash., on October 15. 
The new vessel is 190 feet long, 38 feet wide and 500 
tons burden. She will carry 700,000 feet of lumber, 
and will run between Portland and San Francisco. 
Captain Livenson will command the Poulson. 

The overdue Italian ship Affezione, having been 
lately spoken at sea, has been crossed from the over- 
due list. For aome weeks past the vessel, which is now 
out 134 days from Bahia Blanca for Stockton, Eng- 
land, has ueen quoted for reinsurance, the rate reach- 
ing 40 per cent. 

The steamer Ohio will probably be the last vessel 
to leave Nome before the close of the season. She 
was due to arrive there on October 21 from Seattle. 
The Oregon and Senator are now on the way from 
Nome to Seattle, and the Valencia sailed from Nome 
on October 21 for the Sound. 

A dispatch received at San Francisco on October 
26, from Acapuleo, reported that the British ship 
Burmuda, previously reported as having been towed 
into that port dismasted, by a Kosmos steamer, 
has been surveyed. It is believed that she can be suffi- 
ciently repaired to proceed in sand ballast, for £200, 
for temporary repairs elsewhere. 

Following is the reinsurance list as posted at San 
Francisco on October 29 : French bark St. Donatien, 
158 days from Bordeaux for Adelaide, 60 per cent. 
British bark Principality, 179 days from Junin for 
Rotterdam, 90 per cent. French bark Duchesse de 
Barry, 197 days from Swansea for San Francisco, 15 
per cent. British ship M. E. Watson, 147 days from 
Cardiff for Antofagasta, 10 per cent. 

The Kosmos steamer Neko, arriving at San Fran- 
cisco on October 26 from the South, brought the report 
that the German ship Steinbeck had been appropriated 
by the Chileans. It was reported in dispatches some 
weeks ago that the Steinbeck had gone ashore at Val- 
paraiso. It now appears that the master and crew 
abandoned the vessel when she seemed to be beyond 
saving and after standing by in small boats for forty- 
eight hours they went ashore. A party of Chileans, 
more alert than the Germans, went out to the vessel 
and took possession. Subsequently, when the Stein- 
beck semed to be safe, the Germans attempted to go 
on board again. 



DIED. 



Henry Johan Malinen, No. 794, a native of Finland, 
aged 31, drowned at Karluk, Alaska, June, 1905. 

Hans Peterson, No. 527, a native of Russia, aged 49, 
drowned in San Francisco Bay, October 19, 1905. 

The following members are reported as having 
drowned in the wreck of the schooner Pearl, in Alaska 
waters, fall of 1904: 

Haakon W. F. Kraft, No. 571, a native of Norway, 
aged 30. 

Peter Lindvig, No. 909, a native of Norway, aged 
23. 

Hans Michaelsen, No. 1085, 
aged 25. 

Carl M. Norberg, No. 744, 
aged 22. 



native of Norway, 
native of Sweden, 



DEAFNESS (ANNOT BE CURED 

by local applications, as they cannot reach the diseased 
portion of the ear. There is only way to cure deaf- 
ness, and that is by constitutional remedies. Deaf- 
ness is caused by an inflamed condition of the mucous 
lining of the Eustachian Tube. When this tube is 
inflamed you have a rumbling sound or imperfect hear- 
ing, and when it is entirely closed, Deafness is the re- 
sult, and unless the inflammation can be taken out 
and this tube restored to its normal condition, hear- 
ing will be destroyed forever; nine cases out of ten 
are caused by Catarrh, which is nothing but an in- 
flamed condition of the mucous surfaces. 

We will give One Hundred Dollars for any case of 
Deafness (caused by catarrh) that cannot be cured 
by Hall's Catarrh Cure. Send for circulars, free. 

F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, O. 

Sold by Druggists, 75c. 

Take Hall's Family Pills for constipation. 



F. R. Wall, who was for many years an officer in 
the United States Navy, is now practicing marine law 
in San Francisco. He gives claims of all seafarers 
careful attention. Merchants' Exchange building, 
California street, near Montgomery; rooms 208-209 
Phone Bush 508. 



Towing Big' DrydocK. 

Officials of the Navy Department have 
about determined in a general way how the 
great floating drydock now at Solomon's 
Island, Md., shall be taken to the Phillippines. 

A collier of about 6000 tons displacement 
will do the bulk of the towing. There are 
two reasons for this. One is that a collier 
can, perhaps, stand more bad weather and be 
less liable to mishap than a tug on a trip of 
this length, but more important, she can carry 
a great deal more coal. A tug will accom- 
pany the collier. 

When the drydock starts from Solomon's 
Island, the collier will be from 2000 to 3000 
feet in front of her, the two vessels being 
connected by a tow line. The reason a line 
of this length is needed is that in squally 
weather there will be no danger of the dock 
and the collier being smashed together. This 
line for one-half of its length will be of wire 
cable and for its other half manila hawser. 
In this way both strength and elasticity will 
be secured. In addition, there will be a tow- 
ing machine on board the collier. 

Ordinarily, the dock will be taken along 
with its body six to ten feet in the water. 
This will naturally allow of greater speed; 
but should bad weather come on it can also 
be submerged so that it will draw 28 feet or 
more of water, and will act as a huge anchor 
to the collier and tug until the storm is over. 

The department people see no reason why 
the dock should not reach the Far East in 
safety. The distance to be traveled is 15,000 
miles, and it is calculated that, as not more 
than 100 miles a day can be made, it will take 
five months to cover the distance. 






Germany's Sailor Machine. 



The British Vice-Consul at Bremerhaven 
has reported to his Foreign Office on "Ger- 
man Sea Fishing." He says that the German 
Government spends £20,000 a year for the 
benefit and encouragement of sea fishing, and 
contributes about £3,000 a year toward the 
expenses of the German Sea Fishery Associa- 
tion. Owners of sailing smacks for the her- 
ring fishery receive a building subvention of 
£200 to £250, besides a further sum for the 
purchase of nets and gear. There is also a 
fund from which owners of steam trawlers 
are recompensed for damage to and loss of 
nets. Five thousand pounds is the amount 
to be contributed by the German Government 
for losses in this respect sustained during 
1904. 

The effect of this policy is that while in 
1900 the German fishing consisted of 564 ves- 
sels and 3795 men, in 1904 there were 623 
vessels and 5039 men. The additions to the 
fleet this year are likely to equal those of the 
last four years. It is interesting to note that 
the motor fishing boat is being adopted by 
Germans for their fishing fleets. 

The following paragraph reveals the cause 
of Germany's generosity: 

"The encouragement given by the Govern- 
ment to the fishing industry is considered to 
be partly due to a recognition of the prospect- 
ive value of the material available for the 
manning of the navy."- N. Y. Times. 



Bagley 's Sun-Curcd is now packed in pouches and 
the fronts will be received assorted with labels from 
the foil packages, for premiums. 



Technically, any inhabitant of the United 
Kingdom is liable to be called on to under- 
take the uncongenial bisk of hangman. The 
salary is $5 a week as a retaining fee and $10 
for an execution. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOUENAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 
=JOURNAL= 



Published Weekly by 

THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established In 1887 



W. MACARTHUR.... Editor | P. SCHARRENBKRG, Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail. - $2.00 | Six months, J1.00 

Single copies, 10 cents each. 
Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Satur- 
day noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
"l.-iss matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
southwest corner East and Mission streets, San 
Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, 



NOVEMBER 1, 190o. 



SEAMEN'S CASE PROVED. 



The statement of facts in the ••.jurisdic- 
tion" dispute between Seamen ami Long- 
shoremen, printed in this issue, is intended 
chiefly for the information of the delegates 
to the Pittsburg convention of the American 
Federation of Labor. The Seamen submit 
their statement of the case, with full confi- 
dence that, it will receive the consideration to 
which by its importance it is clearly entitled. 
The principle involved in the dispute in ques- 
tion concerns many other organizations affili- 
ated with the American Federation of Labor; 
indeed, it may literally be said to concern the 
very existence of the Federation itself. It 
follows that delegates who may feel no per- 
sonal or immediate interest in the particular 
case at issue can not but recognize the re- 
sponsibility of determining for themselves 
the real merits of the case, in order that their 
final judgment may redound to the protec- 
tion and advancement of the whole labor 
movement. The task confronting the dele- 
gates may seem a laborious and unpleasant 
one, but when approached in the proper 
spirit its difficulties disappear before the light 
of obvious and inescapable truth. But, what- 
ever the difficulties and whatever the un- 
pleasantness — whatever personal predilections 
or prejudices may stand in the way — the facts 
must be recognized and fully considered in 
order that justice may be done in the par- 
ticular case in question and also in the much 
more important case of the labor movement 
at large. Whatever justification may have 
existed for the policy heretofore pursued by 
the American Federation of Labor in the 
treatment of the "jurisdiction" question gen- 
erally, it lias become abundantly evident that 
nothing further may be hoped from a con- 
tinuance of that policy. Certainly, it is quite 
clear that nothing less than a clear-cut deci- 
sion will suffice in the case of the Seamen and 
Longshoremen. 

The Seamen submit their case with complete 
confidence in the result, a confidence which, 
of course, is based upon the assumed intelli- 
gence and loyalty of the membership com- 



posing the American Federation of Labor and 
of the delegates composing the convention of 
that body. The Seamen regard the facts cited 
from the official records of the Longshore- 
men as evidence of itself sufficient to condemn 
the latter. The truth of these facts can not 
be questioned without questioning the official 
records, nor their meaning obscured without 
closing the eye to the first principles of the 
labor movement, as represented by the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor. Of course, a strong 
attempt will be made to obscure the real issue. 
as the only hope of confusing the minds of 
the delegates. The Longshoremen, having 
been driven by the incidents of the recenl 
past from their previous position of indiffer- 
ence to and contempt for the appeals of the 
Seamen, will raise a false issue by charging 
the latter with an attempt to disrupt the 
Longshoremen's locals on the Pacific Coast. 
In other words, the Longshoremen will en- 
deavor to magnify the effect so as to hide the 
cause. The Seamen are prepared to justify 
every step taken by them in self-defense: at 
the same time, they are determined that that 
phase of the question shall not be permitted 
to occupy the sole attention of the conven- 
tion. Either the cause created by the Long- 
shoremen must justify itself, or the effects 
brought about by the Seamen will justify 
themselves. It is up to the Longshoremen to 
justify the cause of the dispute, or stand 
condemned by the labor movement as disloyal 
to the principles of that institution. In pay- 
ing its respects to the Pittsburg convention 
of the American Federation of Labor, the 
Journal expresses the hope, and conviction, 
that the result of its deliberations on the "ju- 
risdiction" and other questions coming before 
it will strengthen the bonds that unite the 
trade-unions of the country in a fellowship 
based upon mutual respect for right, upon 
which alone the trade-unions and the Federa- 
tion itself can hope to exist and flourish. 



PROFITS IX TOW-BARGES. 



The Scientific American, of recent date, 
contains an article under the title, "Evolu- 
tion of the Tow-Barge," written by John R. 
Spears. The article pronounces the tow- 
barge a profitable system of transportation, 
and prophesies the extension of that system. 
Mr. Spears, reviewing the growth of the tow- 
barge, from its beginning in New York har- 
bor and its extension, first to the Erie Canal, 
then to the Great. Lakes and finally to the 
Atlantic Coast, speaks of the latter phase, as 
follows: 

Schooners had had a monopoly of the coastwise coaJ 
trade, but a tug and barges could deliver the cargo 
much more promptly. They were found inure econom- 
ical, especially for small cargoes. Thus, where a 
schooner would require a crew of six »r eight men I 
tow-barge of equal capacity required but three or four. 
Some good-sized barges got on with two men, and they 
were men who received relatively small pay. The tug 
had a high-priced crew, but it took a dozen barges in 
tow and left them at the different ports alongshore, 
and while they were discharging cargo it came back 
for more, bringing along the empty barges towed out 
en the previous voyage. 

Thus we note that the tow-barge was found 
"more economical" than the schooner solely 
on account of the smaller number of men re- 
quired to man the former and the "relatively 
small pay" received by them. The tow-barge 
having proved profitable on the coasts, the 
system was extended to the ocean-going trade. 
The first venture in that trade is described by 
the writer in the Scientific American, as 
follows : 

The tow steamer Atlas and a barge of 6,000 tons 
capacity, known simply as "No. 93," were sent | from 
New York] on the trip, Kt.OOO miles long, and on 



1'ebruary 26 of the present year they arrived safely 
in San Francisco. The log of the trip shows that the 
cargo was carried more cheaply than it could have 
been carried by a regular steamer. 

Cheapness having scored another victory, 
the insurance people ceased to regard the 
ingoing tow-barge as an "extra-hazard- 
ous" risk, and the business was extended to 
the transatlantic trade. "Figures made in ad- 
vance," says Mr. Spears, "had shown a profit 
for the barge, and on July 3 the first barge- 
traffic voyage across the Atlantic was begun." 
The results of the venture are thus recorded: 

Although the towing steamer carried a cargo and 
towed another astern of her she attained the speed oi 
an ordinary cargo steamer and her consumption of 
real was by no means equal to that of two steamers 
carrying as much cargo as she and her Consort ear 
rod together. There was no loss of time in the pas 
sage and there was an economy of coal in thus carry- 
ing two cargoes across the ocean. At the same time 
the cost of the crew of the barge was far less than 
that of a steamer of equal capacity. 

Our authority concludes his observations 

i n the subject, as follows: 

While a single successful voyage does not establish 
n regular trade necessarily, it goes a long way toward 
doing so in a case like this. For it is to be noted 
that now and for a year past ocean traffic has been 
greatly depressed. Many ships have failed to make 
running expenses. Whon a system of transportation 
proves profitable under such conditions there is no 
doubt about its merits. 

And to show further the confidence that towboal 
men have in their system, a news item from Germany 
may be quoted. A German company has been dis- 
tributing coal around the Baltic, for some years, by 
means of barges. While the E. L. Drake and consort 
mrc crossing the Atlantic this German company took 
a contract to load five towing steamers and nine 
bargee with railway material that is to be delivered in 
the Yenisei River, Siberia; and that is to say that 
these tow-barge voyages are to be made through the 
Arctic Ocean along the whole north coast of Europe 
and for twenty degrees of longitude along the north 
coast of Asia. If to this statement be added the fur- 
ther fact that Pacific Coast lumbermen are preparing 
to tow a huge raft of timber from Seattle to Shang- 
hai it will be seen that the tug and the tow-barge are 
likely to become most important factors in the freight 
traffic of the high seas. 

Mr. Spears knows a good deal about the 
human side of shipping affairs. In justice to 
his own reputation in this regard Mr. Spears 
should now make public his views on the 
human side of the tow-barge business. We 
feel confident that an article such as is here 
suggested would put a decidedly different as- 
pect upon the whole matter. While the tow- 
barge is undoubtedly profitable to the owner 
and shipper, it is a standing menace to the 
safety of all other forms of floating property, 
as well as to the lives of its own crew and the 
crews and passengers on other craft. The 
records speak for themselves, which accounts 
in part, we suppose, for the fact that Mr. 
Spears hasn't mentioned them. As that gen- 
tleman very truly says, "a single successful 
voyage does not establish a regular trade nec- 
essarily." Quite the contrary, a number of 
successful voyages can not establish the tow- 
barge business, when contrasted with its fre- 
quent disasters and constant danger. The 
tow-barge and log-raft may score a profit in 
dollars and cents, but that consideration can 
not be permitted to outweigh the danger, and 
in fact reality, of loss, both of life and prop- 
erty, in other directions. Mr. Spears to the 
contrary notwithstanding, we predict that the 
days of the tow-barge and log-raft are num- 
bered by the days of an early session of Con- 
gress. 



Come to think of it, Mr. Post's "Report to 
the People" indicates that that individual has 
formed a rather exalted estimate of his con- 
stituency. To be sure, Mr. Post pays adver- 
tising rates on his screeds; consequently, the 
"Report" is entitled to as much consideration 
by "the People" as any other ad — no more, 
no less. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



CHINESE MUST NOT COME. 



The November issue of the American Ped- 
erationist, official publication of the American 
Federation of Labor, contains a vigorously- 
worded article on the subject of Chinese Ex- 
clusion, which we here reproduce. Our con- 
temporary is to be congratulated upon its at- 
titude on this all-important question, a ques- 
tion that becomes more important as events 
disclose the determination of certain interests 
to "modify" (i. e., nullify) the existing laws 
on the subject. The Federationist article is 
as follows: 

There seems to be a well-defined policy of 
interested parties to induce Congress, at its 
forthcoming session, to let down the bars to 
the hordes of Chinese coolie laborers so that 
they may come into the United States and its 
possessions. Some ministers of the Gospel 
also are consciously or unconsciously giving 
their services to this venal project. If con- 
sciously, they appear to be more concerned in 
the welfare of the Chinese than of the Ameri- 
can people. If unconsciously, they should 
study the facts and the history of Chinese im- 
migration into the United States and other 
countries. 

Of course, there is reason for complaint 
against the indiscriminate immigration of 
peoples from other countries, and all realize 
that some better regulation and restriction are 
essential in regard to this, but such classes of 
immigration can not be considered, on parallel 
lines when discussing the immigration of 
Chinese laborers. 

The Chinese are unassimilable. Their civ- 
ilization is entirely at variance with that of 
the American people. The Chinese and the 
Caucasians can not live, prosper and progress 
side by side in the same country. The whole 
history of Chinese immigration to any coun- 
try on the face of the globe in appreciable 
numbers has demonstrated this time and time 
again. They have dominated Avherever they 
have entered, unless they have been driven 
out by the force of arms or excluded before 
their numbers were permitted to attain an 
overwhelming influence. Their domination is 
not because of higher attainments, but be- 
cause of their subtlety, their lack of wants, in- 
terests, or desires; because they are cheap la- 
borers and cheap merchants, and thus indus- 
trially and commercially freeze out their com- 
petitors, the American workmen, and even the 
American business men. This has been dem- 
onstrated on the Pacific Coast and in the 
Sandwich Islands, as well as in the Philip- 
pines. 

American workingmen realize the great 
danger, not only to them and their interests, 
but to all the people of our country. Business 
men, students and, observers are in entire ac- 
cord upon this question of the necessity of ex- 
cluding Chinese laborers from coming to the 
United States. 

Workmen are second to none in their re- 
gard for their fellow men, without considera- 
tion from whence they hail; but they would 
be less than human did they disregard the 
lessons of the past and the dangers which 
would threaten not only their standard of 
life, but every hope for the safety of them- 
selves in the present and those who will come 
after them. 

The economic, social, religious and political 
life of our entire people is at stake in this 
question, and they will not tamely submit to 
a false sentimentality to please the few sordid 
profit-mongers who, for a slight monetary 



gain, would endanger the future of our Re- 
public. Aye, they will not submit even to the 
possibility of this backward movement though 
it ruffles the sentimentality and vanity of a 
few ministers of the Gospel who, by the way, 
might better devote their talents and energies 
to the effort for the uplift of the workers of 
our own country. 

The so-called Chinese boycott of American 
products, the activity of the sugar planters of 
Hawaii, who have again evinced their love for 
the Chinese, the subtle tactics pursued, in cer- 
tain quarters by employers antagonistic to or- 
ganized labor, the effusions of some preachers 
— all bear the stamp of a carefully concocted 
plan to "modify," with the hope of ultimate- 
ly nullifying, the entire policy of the Ameri- 
can people to keep the Chinese from coming 
to any place where our flag flies. 

The American workmen, the American 
people, must be equally, if not more, alert 
than those who would, either for the greed of 
gain or a false sentimentality, undermine our 
civilization. 

The bars must not, and will not, be let down 
for the Chinese. 



CHILD LABOR AND THE SCHOOLS. 



Labor Commissioner Stafford, of Califor- 
nia, has favored the Journal with a brief 
summary of his observations concerning the 
effect of the Child-Labor law upon the health 
and attendance of children at the beginning 
of the present school term. As will be noted, 
the enforcement of the new law has been 
highly beneficial in the important respect of 
its effect upon the capacity of the children 
for study. Labor Commissioner Stafford's 
findings are as follows : 

The Garfield Primary School, located on Union 
street, near Montgomery, thia city, has a membership 
of 744 pupils. I have the assurance of the principal, 
Miss Shearer, that in previous yeara at the close of 
the summer vacation, more than fifty children, rang- 
ing from six years of age upward, would return to 
school from the canneries with their hands in a badly 
crippled condition, lacerated by fruit cans and paring 
knives, and aggravated by the acids in the fruits. 
This term there has bren nothing of that kind in evi- 
dence. 

The Lafayette Primary School, located at the junc- 
tion of Kearny and Filbert streets, on Telegraph Hill, 
has 681 pupils, 164 of whom are new from commence- 
ment of present term. Ninety per cent, of the pupils 
in this school are Italians. The large increase is at- 
tributed by Miss K. P. Casey, the principal, to the 
enforcement of the Child-Labor law and the Compul- 
sory Education law. In previous years a large per- 
centage of her scholars have been tardy in returning 
to school after summer vacation, drifting in from the 
canneries, and were so insubordinate as a consequence 
of the fighting and quarreling for cans and fruit 
boxes, that the first two months each year was a strug- 
gle for discipline, with continued punishment and but 
little school progress. This year there has been per- 
fect harmony from the first week. In previous years 
children from six to seven years up have sat for weeks 
unable to write, on account of the crippled condition 
of their hands, as at the Garfield School. 

The Washington Grammar School, situated at the 
corner of Mason and Washington streets, has 673 
pupils, an increase of eighty-one this term. Principal 
T. H. McCarthy says this is almost entirely due to the 
enforcement of the Child-Labor and the Compulsory 
Education laws. This term they have a number of 
children ranging from 8 to 12 years of age that had 
never previously seen the inside of a school-room. 
This year the class membership was full immediately 
after the opening following the holidays, while in 
previous years this dragged from one to two months. 
The attendance of the entire school for the past two 
months has averaged ninety-seven per cent., as against 
ninety per cent, during several years previous to the 
passage of these laws. 

There has been no increase in the application for 
school books to be supplied from the Indigent Fund 
on account of the poverty of parents, from which we 
are .justified in inferring that the removal of small 
children from canneries has not caused poverty or 
hardship in their families. 

The only fair beer in the market bears the 
red label of the United Brewery Workmen. 
See that that guarantee of fair labor is on 
the barrel or bottle from which you are 
served ! 



* 


OFFICIAL. 


* 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 30, 1905. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 7:30 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping still fair. Secretary also stated that the 
delegates to the American Federation of Labor con- 
vention will depart for Pittsburg on Monday, Novem- 
ber 6. E. Ellison was elected Secretary pro tern., and 
C. F. Hammarin Assistant Secretary. The Shipwreck 
Benefit was ordered paid to a member of the crew of 
the schooner Sacramento. 

A. Furuseth, Secretary. 

S. W. cor. East and Mission sts. Tel. Main 5307. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 23, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping medium. 

H. L. Petterson, Agent. 
3004 McCarver st. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 23, 1905. 
Shipping fair. Few men ashore. 

P. B. Gill, Agent. 
1312 Western ave. P.O.Box 48. Tel. James 30.(1. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 23, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; prospects 
uncertain. Very few men ashore. 

Wm. Thorbeck, Agent. 
114 Quincy st. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 443. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 23, 10(15. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

Wm. Gohl Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland (Ok.) Agency, Oct. 23, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Situation unchanged. 

D. W. Paul, Agent. 
40 Union ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 23, 1905. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fair; prospects 
fair. 

C. Sorensen, Agent. 
222 C street. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 566. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 23, 1905. 
Shipping medium; prospects fair. 

Harry Ohlsen, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 774. 



Honolulu (H. T.) Agency, Oct. 16, 1905. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

A. Coldin, Agent. 
Cor. Queen and Nuuanu sts. P. O. Box 96. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' 
S0CIATI0N OF THE PACIFIC. 



AS- 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 26, 1905. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 7:30 
p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary reported 
shipping very quiet. Voting for delegates to the con- 
vention was proceeded with. 

Eugene Steidle, Secretary. 
54 Mission st. 



Seattle (Wash.) Agency, Oct. 19, 1905. 
No meeting. Shipping quiet; not many men ashore. 
W. Sorensen, Agent. 

San Pedro (Cal.) Agency, Oct. 19, 1905. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

G. Lloyd, Agent. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, III., Oct. 23, 1905. 
Shipping quiet. General condition fair. 

Wm. Penje, Secretary. 
123 North Desplaines at. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Oct. 25, 1905. 
Shipping fair. 

Wm. ll. Pb izhsk, Secretary. 
1V4A Lewis st. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S 
UNION. 



Headquarters, Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 18, 1905. 
Shipping slow. 

Daniel Sullivan, Secretary. 

15 Union st. 



It is reported that the Osaka Shosen Kaisha, a rich 
Japanese company, is about to build a. Heel of passen 

en- steamers to ply between Japan and Beattle, \'i. 
tralia and Kuropean ports. It. is reported, also, that. 

tin- large insurance companies uf .ln|mn will not insure; 

\cssels officered by Japanese, on account of tli 

perience and the facl thai many Japanese vessels, 
manned exclusively by Japanese, have recently met 
with many accidents. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



......... . . • ..;....-.-.. .;--;.. ....... ... .....;.. . 



On the Great Lakes. 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 



■ *>»<S><»»<»^><fr<S^<S><S><S>«xfr<3><3><^^ 




The LaKe Storm. 



Probably the w< rst storm in the history of 
Lake navigation struck the lower lake region 
on the night of October 19, although it had 
been blowing on Lake Superior for nearly 
forty-eight hours before that time. It is im- 
possible to give a correct list of fatalities at 
this writing, although at present forty ves- 
sels are reported lost and missing, and twenty 
Lives are supposed to have been the toll col- 
lected by the Storm King. 

The old steamer Sarah E. Sheldon was lest 
off Lorain, Ohio, and Wheelsmen John Fox 
and Charles Johnson lost their lives in a 
fruitless attempt to reach the shore. The 
Gilchrist barge Yukon, Captain Bangs, found- 
ered off Ashtabula. Her entire crew were 
rescued by Captain Tim Haggerty and his 
crew, of the tug Thomas Wilson. The Cor- 
rigan barge Tasmania, in tow of the steamer 
Bulgaria, was lost near Bar Point, and her en- 
tire crew went down with her. The Gilchrist 
steamer Siberia lies in eighteen feet of water 
at Long Point, waterlogged, her pumps hav- 
ing failed to work at a critical moment. The 
steamer Vega, of the same fleet, is reported 
lost. The schooner John V. Jones, of Ken- 
osha. Wis., C. W. Allen, owner, was lost in 
Lake Michigan, and William Thompson and 
E. Olfsen, seamen, were drowned. The re- 
mainder of the crew were rescued by the ear- 
ferry Grand Haven. The Siberia can be 
pumped out and saved. Her cargo of barley 
is probably a total loss. The Canadian 
schooner Minnedosa foundered in Lake 
Huron, taking seven souls with her, including 
the captain's wife. The schooner J. S. Fay 
lost her mate. The steamer Progress left Ash- 
land recently, and has not been seen since. 
She carried a crew of fifteen men. The 
steamer Republic went ashore near Sheboy- 
gan, and the barge Malta parted her towline 
from the steamer William R. Linn, in Lake 
Huron, but her crew worked her into Port 
Huron under her own canvas. The passen- 
ger- steamer Western States had a narrow es- 
cape, but is safe. The schooner Alta went on 
the rocks near Munising. Her crew of seven 
men and one woman were rescued in an ex- 
hausted condition. The steamer A. A. Turn- 
er went ashore, then caught fire and burned. 
Her crew were rescued by a tug, name un- 
known. The schooner Alga is ashore at Pic- 
ture Rocks, with her rudder gone. The crews 
of the Alta and Olga were rescued by fisher- 
men. 



Notice to Seamen. 



Henry Johnson, No. 9854, Edward Nichol- 
son, No. 6783, and Charles Clarson, No. 1559, 
are requested to communicate with Agent 
Murphy, of the Lake Seamen's Union, at 
Manitowoc. 



The movement of iron ore in September fell 
short of that of August, but this was expected, 
for the month always brings storms. Duluth 
shipped 1,197,888 tons; Two Harbors 1,015,- 
955 tons; Superior 698,752 tons, a total of 2,- 
912,595. The total of the season to date is 
16,810,632 tons for the three ports, against 
8,719,540 tons during the same period last 
year. 



Sober Seamen. 



If the time is nut already here, it soon will be, when 
the saying, ' ' Drunk as a sailor, ' ' will be meaning- 
less. 

With the passing of the sailing ships, the old-time 
sailors are disappearing. An entirely different class 
of men has come in with the modern steamship. The 
mariners of to-day are not sent aloft in a howling gale 
to furl topsails — they work with electrical and steam 
machinery. There is not so much now to breed the 
devil-may-care spirit of the traditional Jack tar. 

Nowhere is the change more apparent than in the 
American Navy. It has been the time-honored custom 
of the bluejacket to get drunk immediately upon go- 
ing ashore and to stay drunk until haled back to his 
ship, perhaps by a guard of marines. Now, the men 
of the Navy who become drunk are the exception. Of 
the 750 enlisted men on the Maine, the flagship of the 
North Atlantic squadron, 700 have not one bad con- 
duct mark against them. In the paymaster's safe on 
boaru the Maine there is more than $3.1, 000 in pay and 
allowances due to and uncalled for by the men of the 
squadron. This is proof that the grade of intelligence 
in the Navy has been greatly raised in a few years. 
What is true of the Navy is true, though to a less ex- 
tent, in the merchant marine. — Cleveland Leader. 

The foregoing is unique, inasmuch as it has 
at least a few good words . for the seaman. 
The fact that it appears in the editorial col- 
umn makes it all the more remarkable. But 
it docs not go far enough, and is really a com- 
pliment for the men of the Navy only. Cer- 
tainly it is equally true of the seamen of the 
Great Lakes, and there has not been fifty per 
cent of the drinking done this year by seamen 
on the Lakes that was done last season. The 
proof is that while the Postoffice Money Order 
business at Conneaut Harbor alone has in- 
creased a hundredfold this year, the saloon 
business at that port has been a black failure. 
Of all the saloon-keepers at the Harbor (there 
were thirty -two of them), only two have been 
able this year to employ a bartender. One 
failed, and none are making money. So that 
does not show the merchant marine in such a 
bad light, and I venture to predict a greater 
falling off in the saloon business next season, 
and consequently fewer saloons in our little 
port. W. H. J. 

Conneaut, O. 



The car-ferry Grand Haven, owned by the 
Grand Trunk car-ferry line, a Milwaukee cor- 
poration which has been operating the boat 
between Milwaukee, Wis., and Grand Haven, 
Mich., in connection with the Grand Trunk 
railway system, will be sold to the highest 
bidder on November 7. The boat was built 
two and a half years ago and cost $350,000. 
She is now in the custody of the Fidelity 
Trust Company, of Milwaukee, as the result 
of default by the ferry company in the pay- 
menl of the principal of seventeen bonds of 
$1,000 each. 



The steel tug Frank Perry, sailed by Cap- 
tain Ryerse and owned by Frank Perry of 
Sault Ste. Marie, sunk off Boot Island, in the 
Cheneux group, in the storm of October 19. 
Several plates were crushed in by the rocks, 
and the boat now lies in a dangerous position. 
The tug had a raft of pulpwood in tow and 
this was broken up and scattered along the 
shores of the surrounding islands. A fifty- 
mile gale accompanied by snow squalls was 
blowing. 



The Matthews Steamship Co., limited, has 
been incorporated with a capital of $250,000 
to build steamships and to carry on a trans- 
portation business. The provisional directors 
are all Torontonians. 



New Steamer Contract. 



The first contract for a new steamer to be 
added to the Chicago passenger fleet next sea- 
son has been awarded to the Craig Shipbuild- 
ing Company of Toledo, by the Indiana Trans- 
portation Company, operating the line be- 
tween Chicago and Michigan City. The new 
boat will be an important addition to the Chi- 
cago fleet, being exceeded in size only by the 
Christopher Columbus. The cost will be up- 
ward of $300,000. 

Although no expense will be spared in add- 
ing to the safety and style of the steamer, 
the chief point accented in the contract is that 
of dispatch. To this end a speed of twenty- 
four miles an hour has been specified, in order 
to insure a running time of two hours between 
Chicago and the Indiana town, from dock to 
dock. The boat is to be delivered ready for 
service. May 15 next. 

As the run of the new steamer is short, but 
thirty staterooms are to be provided, insuring 
plenty of light and air in the cabins and ad- 
ditional comfort for passengers. The boat 
will be 285 feet long by 40 feet wide and is 
designed to accommodate 3,500 passengers. 



Old WrecK Found. 



The wreck of a schooner was discovered in 
Lake Michigan on October 10, two and one- 
half miles from New Buffalo, and the belief 
is that it is the remains of the Thomas Hume, 
which went down four years ago carrying a 
crew of seven men. A fisherman got his lines 
caught in the wreckage and George Culbert, 
expert diver, went down and found the hulk. 
It is 175 feet long, but the scroll work was 
gone and he could find nothing to indicate the 
name of the boat. 

The Thomas Hume and her sister ship, the 
Rock Simmons, left Chicago together one 
stormy night in 1891, and the Rock Simmons 
was the only one which reached Muskegon, 
the Thomas Hume never being heard from. 
She was owned by the lumber firm of Hackley 
& Hume, of Muskegon. 



Colonel G. J. Lydeeker, in charge of river 
and harbor and lighthouse work in the De- 
troit District, has received a letter from the 
superintendent of the Harbor of Refuge at 
Harbor Beach, Lake Huron, from which the 
following extract is taken : "I would say that 
I am advised by many Lake masters that it 
has been generally understood among them 
that owing to the work on the piers in prog- 
ress at present it is unsafe for vessels to 
make the harbor during heavy weather from 
the supposed fact that the harbor is blocked 
most of the time with the contractors' outfit. 
This is not the case, and I would recommend 
that the broadest information possible be given 
out that the harbor is at all times clear for 
incoming craft and there is ample room for 
all to make fast and lie in safety." 



AVhile sheltered at St. Michaels Bay, Mani- 
toulin Island, the barge Vesta, in tow of the 
steamer Juno, caught fire and was burned to 
the water's edge. The burned boat was own- 
ed by W. J. Pulling, of Windsor, and was 
valued at $3500. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Marine Notes. 



Peter Cuba, nineteen years of age, a seaman 
on the steamer Merrimac, had his right arm 
cut off by an engine at Detroit recently. 

The steamer Cumberland struck the pro- 
tection pier of the East Water street bridge 
at Milwaukee recently and broke off a section 
thirty-six feet in length at the west end of the 
pier. 

Edward Morris, assistant general superin- 
tendent of the Chicago Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, has resigned. His place has not yet 
been filled, but it is believed John Smith, now 
foreman of the shipyard, will be appointed. 

Business Agent Scanlon, of the Seamen's 
Union, at Detroit, has a valuable letter for 
Mrs. Venera Chilson. She is said to be stew- 
ardess on a small steamer, and Mr. Scanlon 
would like to know which boat she is aboard. 

The newly organized Mathews Shipping 
Company has called upon English shipyards 
for tenders for two new Lake freighters full 
Welland Canal size. The boats are to ply be- 
tween Fort William and Montreal, and must 
be ready by next spring. 

Improvements to cost $500,000 around Buf- 
falo harbor are being made by the Govern- 
ment. Work on the foundation to the 1000- 
foot arm to Stony Point breakwater has be- 
gun, and a start has been made on the new 
$100,000 breakwater north of the entrance to 
Buffalo River. 

The new steamer J. G. Butler, building at 
the Lorain yard of the American Shipbuild- 
ing Co. for Captain Charles L. Hutchinson 
and others of Cleveland will probably be 
launched on November 4, should weather con- 
tinue favorable. The keel of this steamer was 
laid on September 6. 

The schooner Burton, which went on the 
rocks at Barcelona during the recent great 
storm, has gone to pieces. The schooner was a 
total loss. The Burton was valued at $5500 
and was not insured. The Burton had a 
cargo of 950 tons of coal for Toledo from 
Buffalo and was on her way to the former 
port when she went ashore. 

The schooner Elizabeth, lumber-laden, 
dragged her anchors and was driven on the 
shore north of Menominee recently, where she 
was soon torn to pieces by the storm. The 
crew escaped safely in a yawl boat. The 
Elizabeth was bound from Cedar River to 
Menominee with 60,000 feet of lumber. She 
was owned by Captain Fred Hutchinson, of 
Marinette. 

The steamer Brazil is at the drydock in 
South Chicago with a huge stone weighing 
fully 1500 pounds held securely between the 
plates in the center of the boat near the keel. 
The stone was picked up when the steamer 
struck near the Lime Kilns, in the Detroit 
River. The big stone, after tearing away a 
number of plates and cutting a big hole in 
the side of the Brazil served as a plug to pre- 
vent the boat from leaking. 

With eight feet of water in her hold and 
the water gaining every minute despite the 
work of the pumps, the steamer Gladstone 
struggled into Milwaukee recently, just in 
time to escape sinking. There was hardly 
enough steam left to propel the ship, so much 
of it was used in operating the pumps to keep 
the vessel afloat. The leak was caused by the 
buffeting of the gale on Lake Michigan, and 
the crew were completely exhausted by their 
efforts when the ship arrived at Milwaukee. 



TONAWANDA LETTER LIST. 



Anderson, H. B. 
Andrasen, Nills S. 
Atcheson, Fred 
Brown, Clarence J. 
Bergorstrom, Oscar 
Baase, Paul 
Brown, Fred C. 
Bandon, Fred 
Brown, Joe 
Brinniers, Heer K. 
Carlsen, Carl 
Coburn, J. 
Cobb, James W. 
Cunningham, John 
Clare, Frank 
Conger, Joseph 
Champine, Tony 
Cattanach, Ralph 
Christensen, Chas. 
Curire, John 
.Corran, F. 
Charlson, Karl A. 
Danielsson, J. 
Donaldson, Chas. B. 
Daugherty, James 
Drucks, Louis 
Engulson, J. M. 
Fjeldsgaard, Adolr 
Furtaw, Parker 
Farran, James 
Glanz, Edw., Jr. 
Gillgren, Peter 
Green, J. S. 
Gay, Harry B. 
Housen, Thergrlm 
Hansen, Martin 
Heeley, Edmond 
Hillman, J. R. 
Hansan, A. 
Hansen, Karl Otto 



Herring, S. A. 
Hillman, Henry 
Hanson, P. 
Jacobson, August 
Johnson, Joe 
Johanssan, Carl 
Karlsen, Karl A. 
Knudsen, H. 
Kozlaske, Michael 
Karlsson, G. P. 
Leeland, W .M. 
Lundgren, Victor 
Lafarge, John 
Labo, Peter 
Maese, Max 
Mathiasen, Oscar 
Magnassan, C. J. 
McGrath, R. 
McLawby, Ed. 
McDonald. MuraocK 
McLeod, Thos. 
McNamara, Michael 
Nicholson, Andrew 
Milsen, Nils. 
Nilsen, Welenius 
Pedersen, A. H. 
Palmatier, George 
Pederson, N. A. 
Omonsen, Tollak 
Rankin, Jac. W. 
Sullivan, S. P. 
Sarsen, Dick. 
Shannon, H. P. 
Stalls, William 
Sheldon, H. S. 
Tovatt, Frank 
Van Antyerp, Chas. 
Waters, Frank 
Young, James 



SOUTH CHICAGO LETTER LIST. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



Linquist, Oscar 
Ebere, Wm. 
Fielde, M. E. 
Alexson, O. S. 
Smith, G. E. 
Callahan. Fred 
Moran, M. 
Kessler, L. B. 
Hicks, Chas. 
Jensen, J. C. 
Jensen, Gust 



Haurunen, S. 
Tinnerson, J. 
Sorensen, S. 
Christenson, L. 
Duffy, Frank 
Porter, H. 
Duffy, O. P. 
Anderson, L. 
Terheren, Ed. 
McCaskey. J. 
Ellefson, Sam 



DETROIT LETTER LIST. 



Whitcomb, Harry M. 

Hansen, Carl 

Easu, Al. 

A dead letter ad- 
dressed to Wm. G. 
Weber. 

Larsen, Crean 

McManus, Wm. 

Gallagher, J. C.-2 

Westover, Alex. 

Olsen, Waldmar-2 

Brown, W. H. J. 

Johnnieson, Hilne 

Thomas, James-2 



Wald, Fra;.k 
Ayers, E. E. 
Anderson, Harold 
Nadu, N., Jr. , 
Nicklson, Donald 
Roland, Frank M. 
Almand, Albert 
Doyle, Jos. 
Blakly, A. 
Johnson, Victor 
Farwell, Roy 
Lenard, L. 
Pehnssen, John 
Squrr, W. J. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

(Lakes District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

121 and 123 North Desplaines Street, Chicago, 111. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 



BRANCHES. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 93C R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 171 East River Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1295. 

TOLEDO, 719 Summit Street 

Telephone Black 6981. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

ASHLAND, WIS 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone Peoples 4615. 

BAY CITY, MICH 919 North Water Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 94 Hamilton Street 

SUB-AGENCIES. 

MANITOWOC, WIS 809 South Eighth Street 

ERIE, PA 107 East Third Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 

SANDUSKY, 1107 Adams Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 931 Military Street 



HOSPITALS AND BELIEF STATIONS. 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL.; DETROIT, MICH.; CLEVELAND, O. 



RELIEF 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Erie, Pa. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistel, Mich. 



STATIONS. 

Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



We Don 't Pa tronize. 

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 
Br xT a< ?~ McKinney Bread Company, St. Louis, Mo.- 
National Biscuit Company, Chicago, HI 
?„ ar8 ;T CarI „ Upman of New York City; Kerbs, 
Wertheim & Schiffer, of New York City; The Henry 
George and Tom Moore. 

P1 ?^~ W £ sh , burn ,V-,9. rosby Mil 'ins Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn.; Kelley Milling Co., Kansas City. Mo 

Groceries — James Butler, New York City 

Meats— Kingan Packing Company, of Indianapolis. 
lnd. 

Pipes— Wm. Demuth & Co., New York 

Tobacco— American and Continental Tobacco Com- 



CLOTHING. 
B *" ons — Davenport PearI Button Company, Daven- 
ClSthW° M a; ^fr 6 ", 12 & Co - Newark. N. J 
Clothing — N. Snellenberg & Co Phlladelnhi-, Do . 
Clothiers' Exchange. Rochester; N Y fs mwbrid^e 
fork.° ' PhiIadel P hla ' Pa.; Blauner Bros?New 

Corsets— Chicago Corset Company. 

rof&T J -- H ~, Cown 4 e Glove C0.i Des Moines, Iowa • 
California Glove Co., Napa, Cal. mwa, 

m v' B - Stetson Company, Philadelphia Pa • F 
«,».<L Knox Company, Brooklyn, N Y pnla ' ^ a ' • ** 
TmV"™ ^ 0lla ^ S_ -y ni ' ed ? hirt a "d Collar Company 
ClniW t£- ; K V „ an Z « andt ' J acobs & Co., Troy. N Y 

Kaiser, Ne e w b °Y d o V rk & C,ty°' ™* N ' Y ' ; **™° * 
Sh Co!^h I fc r ago y l B , rOS - Ly " n ' Mass -= J - E - Tilt Shoe 
Tfix?fi« er ?T R ' 1SSeII „ Mfg - Co - Middletown, Conn 
T "ood e s S )7Lo e w r eir. a Ma M s anUfaCtUrinS ° 0mpany ^'^ 
Underwear— Oneita Knitting Mills, Utica, N Y 
Woolens— Hartford Carpet Co., Thompsonville Conn • 

J. Capps & Son, Jacksonville, 111 """ue, conn., 



PRINTING AND PUBLICATIONS 

B ° & 0k ^f C^tooWVy' ChiCag °' ln '= B ~ 

Ne ^ s ? a P er f— Philadelphia Democrat. Philadelphia 

Otv M U o dSO w' R ir ^ ber J y *n C °- P'tai«i ofS 

lnd ' OazetTe v£?? k J7 S°- Pushers. Hammond 

geles, Cal Haute, lnd.; Times, Los An- 

POTTERY, GLASS, STONE, AND CEMENT 

PO vfn7 S£* Br x i , ck 7Z J - B - ° wens Pottery Co. of Zine^- 

caw m l0] r™w h ^ Ste l n J erra Cotta Co. of Chi- 
cago, ill., c. W. Stine Pottery Co., White Cottac-P 

2 hl0; TT? arb £ ^ Wa , ,ker Refractory Cc " PiVtsbufs' 

M a fg. ^v&TiT Cement and mica SSJSS 

MACHINERY AND BUILDING 
Carriage and Wagon Builders— S R Bailev Xr r n 

Mast^cTrr ^rH^Fl. 8 ??" /' Hodg^'' ^buiy! 

Oenerai'wflrrtw^! 80 ?" £ Co - Amesbury, Mass. 

uenerai Hardware — Landers, Frary & Clark ^Ptnn 
£°, mpany ' New Britain, Conn.; I ver Johnson Arms 
PMy Pa sv'rJ u t , c . hb i3 r ^ M £ RS - : " elspy Furna " e c °™ 

1'd.ny, Syracuse, N. Y. ; Brown & Shame Tool fnm 
pany, Providence, R. I ; John R U s4ll Cut erv r™' 
pany Turner's Falls. Mass." Atlas Tack r « mm' 

Ph a ia ha p V a en ' ZVh = He I ? ry Disston&Ca. PhX.e£ 

„,;; ,'r. • American Hardware Co. (Russell & Er- 

MerrUt T^' & * C S& n Co) - New Britain Conn ; 
tv,v1 J } * Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

^rn» d t Steel ,7- n j; nois Iron and Bolt Company of 
a?a P Pai1? V M "v 111 ^ Carbo ™ n dum Company? NJag- 
%£,„ . X s ' N - Y ' : Casey & Hedges, Chattanooera 
SaTtleV M U /n e ? f ou . ndr y Company. Toronto? On* | 
Pale Needle r„ C £i, r,n8r S ompa ! , . y ' Springfield Ohio 
n?JL i t e Company, Frank n, N. H; American 
£ r » L »»"> Company, New Orange, N J.™ Payne 
?F g R PaTc P h an & a EI T ra> * Y - : Unro,n ^on Works 
Vt' • Art M^i^™ aCt ?. nng . Con, P an y)' Rutland. 
N Y • vJZ o a L C T° nStr ^ ct, , on Company, Jamestown 
H^iJtr rie City Iron Works, Erie. Pa.; David May- 
dole Hammer Co.. Norwich, N. Y.; Singer Se wine- 
Machine Company, Elizabeth, N. J National f K\£ 
vator and Machine Company, HoneWdaS pi ; Pitta- 
T^« S « E i n ? nd . ed MetaI Co., Pittsburg. Pa 
^'«= A " wtec tural— Geo. L. Meskir. Evansville lnd 
Stoves— Germer Stove Company, Erie Pa • "Radiant 

w°r m , C ,,f? Ves ' £ anges and H °t Air Blast,' Erie Pa* 
Wrought Iron Range Co., St. Louis, Mo 

R .„ _ ,, WOO, A ND FURNITURE. 

ife'mlfBros^l^LoSis^Mo^ 6 " ° rIeanS ' La ' branch 
^ampto^asr 8 Manufacturing Company, North- 
Brooms and Dusters— The Lee Broom and Duster 
Company, of Davenport, Iowa; M. Goeller's Sons 
Pinnols! ' ; Merkle -Wiley Broom Co , Paris! 

^nJ^St 8 - - xr an * e u Breed & Co - Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Cooperage— Northwestern Cooperate and Lumber 
Company (otherwise known as the Buckeye sVave 
S?, m ^ an . n ' ) K°A 0hi0 - Michigan, and Wisconsin; Elg n 
?""r Tub Company. Elgin, III.; Williams Coo per- 
oPpSp , r Sr Pa B n , y uf?. n Mo Pa,mer Ma "«^turing Company, 

S^ a 7 _Wick A China Company. Kittanning. Pa. 

rumiture— -American Billiard Table Company. Cincin- 
nati. Ohio: Brumby Chair Company, Mnrle ta Ga • 
O Wisnt-r Piano Company, Brooklyn. N Y ■ Krel 
Pjanp Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; N. Drucker & Co 
Cincinnati Ohio, trunks; St. Johns Table Company 
fn;^ hn f" MlC - h i l - Gra ^ d R aPif'« Furniture Man uf; <■-' 
turing Association. Grand Rapids, Mich.; Derby 
Desk Co.. Boston, Miss • 

OolAT.ea.f--W. H Kemp Company, New York N Y- 
Andrew Reeves, Chicago, 111.: George Reeve's Cane 
May, N J.; Hastings Company, Philadelphia 
Henry Ayers, Philadelphia, Pa p ' • 

Lumber— Trinity County Lumber Company, Grove- 
ton, Texas; Reinle Bros. & Solomon, Baltimore 
Md.; Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company 
Morehouse, Mo.; Union Lumber Company, Fort 
Bragg, Cal. 

Leather— Kullman, Salz & Co., Benicia, Cal.: A n 
Patrick & Co., San Francisco. Cal.; Columbus H„ K g v 
and Harness Company, Columbus, Ohio- Lerch 
Bros.. Baltimore, Md. ercn 

Rubber— Kokomo Rubber Company, Kokomo. lnd • n 
F. Goodrich Rubber Company, Akron. Ohio m a : 
mond Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio 

Pa £ er , B °* es — K- N. Roweii & Co., Batavla n y- j 
N. Roberts & Co., Metropolis, 111 ' ' J - 

Paper — Remington-Martin Paper Co., Norfolk N V • 
Potter Wall Paper Co.. Hoboken, N J ' 

Typewriters— Underwood Typewriter Company Hart- 
ford, Conn. l 

Watches— Keystone Watch Case Company, of Phila- 
delphia. Pa.: Crescent Courvoisoer Wilcox Com 
pany: Jos. Fahy, Brooklyn Watch Case Company 
Sag Harbor. ^ *■ 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Advertising Novelties— Novelty Advertising Com- 

tinny, Coshocton, Ohio. 
Burlap— H. B. Wiggins' Sons' Company, Bloomfleld, 

Bill Pasters— Bryan * Co.. Cleveland. Ohio 
Railways— Atchison. Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad- 

Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company 
Telegraphy- W.-stern Union Telegraph Company,' and 

its Messenger Service. 
D. M. Parry, Indianapolis, lnd. 
Wellman, Osborne & Co., Lynn, Mass.; Thomas Tavlor 

& Son, Hudson, Mass. ■»«« 

C. W. Post. Manufacturer of Grape Nuts and Pontum 

Cereal. Battle Creek, Mich. "" 

Lehmaier-Swartz & Co., New York CH". 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



On the Atlantic Coast. 



(Continued from page 3.) 



The Government has been quite busy lately 
inspecting and testing various new maritime 
safety appliances, such as collapsible life- 
boats, rafts and life-preservers, but nary a 
seaman has been inspected or tested to see if 
he is efficient, or if there are enough of 
him to properly man the lifeboats and rafts. 
To the superficial observer this procedure 
would seem to be highly illogical, to call it 
nothing worse. But, when we look a little 
below the surface, we soon perceive that there 
is a method in the madness of the authorities. 
Ours is notoriously a government for the pro- 
tection and promotion of money-making en- 
terprises, and there is much money to be made 
out of the manufacture of maritime life-sav- 
ing appliances. But who, except a crimp, 
ever heard of any money to be made out of 
the manufacture or otherwise of seamen? 
The inference from this is plain enough to 
any one who understands the relations of a 
trust with the Government. If seamen could 
be turned out cheaply— say, in a toy factory, 
there would soon be an incorporated trust in 
the article, with an imposing-looking lobby in 
Washington, getting laws on the statute bonks 
compelling every blessed American vessel to 
carry crews of standard grade — and enough 
of them to patchelamile. 



A good deal of sympathy and condolence 
has lately been extended by various news- 
papers to the Sewalls, of Bath, Me., on their 
remarkable run of bad luck in having lost 
so many vessels in such a comparatively short 
time. To a sailorman conversant with the 
history of the vessels of that firm, however, it 
seems more like a case of the judgment of God 
than one of bad luck. It is not necessary to 
mention any names or to go into details, but 
it is not exceeding the truth to say that the 
Sewall ships, in the treatment of their crews, 
have been among the worst of the many min- 
iature hells afloat that have disgraced the 
American flag, and made it hated by seamen 
of all nations. That the owners of the fleet 
winked at, and even sanctioned, the many out- 
rages committed against the crews of their 
ships is an inference fully warranted from 
the manner in which they stood by their 
bucko masters and mates when charged in the 
courts with having maltreated or beaten to 
death some poor sailor. Several of the worst 
bucko mates that our merchant marine was 
ever cursed with were steady employes of the 
Sewalls during many years. The Sewalls 
will get no sympathy from sailors on account 
of the loss of their vessels. 



The organized workingmen of New York 
are carrying on a vigorous educational cam- 
paign among the voters of the State on the 
issue of the "Labor Amendment" to the State 
Constitution, to be voted upon at the coining 
election. This amendment, as has already 
been noted in the Journal, is intended to con- 
fer upon the Legislature power to fix the rate 
of wages and hours of labor of all mechanics 
and laborers employed by the State. Its im- 
portance to workingmen in general, and 
those of New York in particular, is therefore 
great. 



It is the "voice of the plain people" now. 
It will be the "voice of the rabble" on the day 
after election. 



Fag Ends. 



Eternal agitation is the price of progress. 



Opportunity makes the grafter and proves 
the honest man. 



Prosperous crime and profligacy are the 
^rave-diggers of a nation. 



Be sure that he is neither good nor wise 
who prates of Brotherhood, yet God denies. 



When right, stanc pat; when wrong, con- 
fess. None can do more; none- should do less. 



Imagination is an eloquent pleader and n 
stern arraigner, but a poor judge. 



Few men fear to offend God as much as 
they fear to offend the conventionalities of 
mankind. 



The head often saves the hand many a hard 
task, and the hand often saves the head many 
a hard knock. 



No maxim, however wise, can be universally 
true so long as no two men in the world are 
alike in mind. 



Patience and perseverance may not conquer 
the world, but they will always deserve what- 
ever measure of success thev can command. 



Nowhere does the saying that "actions 
speak louder than words" apply with more 
force than in the realm of trade-unionism. 



Beliefs are good, but works count more in 
footing up life's final score. The Lord will 
judge us by our deeds, not by our faith in 
musty creeds. 



Many a reformer has obtained a following 
simply by his ability to mass a number of 
errors and probabilities together in such a 
manner as to present a plausible whole. 



The basis of all morality, all religion, is the 
eternal, immutable truth that there is a nat- 
ural, necessary and inseparable connection 
between happiness and virtue, and, miseiy and 
vice. 



It shakes our faith in human nature when 
we are reminded, every now and then, by 
some queer turn in human life's queer plan, 
that wealth, not principles, proclaims the 
man. 



The poor but genteel and college-educated 
trust editor who barks every time his vulgar 
but wealthy master says, "Sic 'em, boy!" is 
a living proof of the truth that "knowledge 

is power!" 



Good laws, faithfully administered, are the 
chief essential of good government. The 
Initiative and Referendum will enable us to 
get as good laws as we want to have, and the 
Recall will enable us to have them faithfully 
administered. 



"What man has done man may do;" and 
if we are not willing to do as much to con- 
serve our liberties as the founders of this Re- 
public did to establish them, we deserve no 
better fate than slavery under a self-imposed, 
despotism. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with the 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER. Secretary-Treasurer. 

1%a Lewis St.. Boston, Mass. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, MASS., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
BANGOR. ME., 211 Broad St. 
PORTLANH, ME., 377A Fore St. 
NEW BEDFORD. MASS., 7 South Water SI 
PROVIDENCE, R. I., 464 South Main St. 
NEW YORK, N. V., 51-52 South St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y.. 68 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA.. 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE. MD., 604 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, VA., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, ALA.. 104 Commerce Si 
NEW ORLEANS, LA., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 
BRUNSWICK, CA. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 
BROOKLYN. N. Y., 15 Union St. 

Branches : 
BOSTON, MASS., 284 Commercial St. 
JERSEY CITY, N. J., 35 Hudson St. 
PHILADELPHIA. PA., 129 Walnut St. 

BALTIMORE, MD., 1730 Thames St. 
NORFOLK, VA.. 89 Church St. 

NEWPORT NEWS, VA., -31 t Washington Ave. 
MOBILE, ALA., 104 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS. LA., 937 Tchoupitoulas St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Branches: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., io« Christopher Stt. 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 

Headquarters : 
BOSTON, MASS., Commercial Wharf. 

Branch: 
GLOUCESTER, MASS. n]i. Main St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 



WHITF.HALL 



Headquarters: 

N. V. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters : 

CHICAGO, ILL, 121-123 North Desplaines St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, WIS.. 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y.. 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St 
CLEVELAND, O., 171 East River St. 
TOLEDO, O., 719 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St 
DETROIT, MICH., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, WIS., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, WIS., 515 East Second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, MICH, 919 North Water St. 
MANITOWOC, WIS., 809 South Eighth St. 
ERIE. PA., 107 East Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL., 9142 Mackinaw 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 1107 Adams St. 
PORT HURON, MICH., 931 Military St 



St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Headquarters: 
DETROIT, MICH., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA. N. V.. 154 Main St 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY. MICH.. 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O. Tel. 305. 
CLEVELAND, O., Atwater Bide., Room 1. 
CHICAGO, ILL.. 42 Wells St. Tel. Main 3637 
MILWAUKEE, WHS.. 317 IHorkla St. 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT, O., 981 Day St. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters : 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., Southwest corner East 
and Mission Sts. 

Branches : 
TACOMA. WASH., 3004 McCarver St. 
SEATTLE, WASH, 1312 Western Ave. 
PORT TOWNS END, WASH.. 114 Quincy St. 
ABERDEEN, WASH., P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND, OR., 40 Union Ave. 
EUREKA, CAL.. P. O. Box 327. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL., P. O. Box 2380. 
HONOLULU, H. T., P. O. Box 96. 



PACIFIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 46 Steuart St. 
Branch: 

SEATTLE, WASH., Colman Dock, Room 10. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 54 Mission St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, WASH., Colman Dock. Room 9. 
SAN PEDRO, CAL., P. O. Box 2155. 



FISHERMEN'S PROTECTIVE UNION OF 
PACIFIC COAST AND ALASKA. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 9 Mission St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, WASH., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, OR., P. O. Box 1S3. 



THE 



BAT AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 54 Mission St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, CAL., 200 M St. 



THE COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALIA 

29 Erskine Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



List of Union Offices 

ALLIED PRINTING TRADES 

COUNCIL 

Of San Francisco, Cal. 



Abbott, F. H., 314-316 Battery. 

Altvater Printing Co., 2593-2595 Mission. 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

Art Printery, The, 41-43 Eighth. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery. 

Barry, James H,. The Star Press, {29 
Montgomery. 

Belcher & Phillips, 508 Clay. 

Ben Franklin Press, 123 Seventh. 

Bcnsen & Liss, 776 Bryant. 

Berry Bros., 320 Sansome. 

Bickell, L. A., 19 First. 

Black Cat Press, 402 McAllister. 

Boulin-Leichner Co., 519 Filbert. 

Brown, Andrew, Printing Co., First and 
Mission. 

Brunt, W. N. Co., 102-104 Second. 

Budde, H. P., Cal. Press, 407 >/ 2 Turk. 

Caldwell, J. E., 526 Montgomery. 

Clayburgh, Leilich & Schneider, City 
Hall Square. 

Church Press, 23 Davis. 

Collins, C. J., 16 Hayes. 

Cook, The Morton L., 14 4 Second. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

Cubery & Co., 587 Mission. 

Danish Printing Co., 410 Kearny. 

Daily Racing News, 21-23 First. 

Day & McClinton, 538 Sacramento. 

Drake & Baker, 850 Market. 

Drum Bros., 638 Mission. 

Eagle Printing Co., The, 344 Kearny. 

Eastman, Frank & Co., 509 Clay. 

Eastman & Mitchell, 28 First. 

Fording & Halle, 22 Clay. 

Francis-Valentine Co., 5 Anna I ane, off 
Eddy. 

Gabriel Printing Co., 320 Sansome. 

Galloway Publishing Co., 14 6 Second. 

Gilmartin Publishing Co., The. 19 First. 

Guedet Printing Co., 935 Market. 

Golden State Printing Co., 73 Third. 

Golden West Press, 146 Second. 

Hancock Bros., 809 Mission. 

Harvey, John D., 509 Clay. 

Haydn Printing Co., 417 Montgomery. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

Hiester, Wm. A., 529 California. 

Hughes, E. C. & Co., 511 Sansome. 

Illinois-Pacific "Glass Works, 10-16 Main. 

Jalumstein Printing Co., 310 Hayes. 

Knarston Printing Co., 529 Washington. 

Lafontain, J. R., 535 California. 

Latham & Emanuel, 511 Sacramento. 

Leader, The, 532 Commercial. 

Levingston, L., 540 Clay. 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

Luce & Her Co., 406 Sansome. 

Lynch, James T., 514 Kearny. 

Lyon, W. T. & Co., 161 First. 

Majestic Press, The, 314 Eighth. 

McCracken Printing Co., 509 Kearny. 

Medina & Co., 221 Sacramento. 

Meyerfeld, Alfred M., 414 Pine. 

Monahan, John & Co., 412 Commercial. 

Moore-Hinds Co., 28 First. 

Morris & Bain, 108 Market. 

Murdock, C. A. & Co., 532 Clay. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Nevin, C. W. & Co., 532 Commercial. 

Occidental Mystic Press, 6 Cottage Row. 

Pacific Goldsmith Publishing Co., 146 
Second. 

Partridge, John, 306 California. 

Pernau Bros., 543 Clay. 

Phelan, F. M., Ill Cook. 

Phillips & Van Orden, 508 Clay. 

Police Bulletin of San Francisco, Hall 
of Justice. 

Polyglott Press, 628 Montgomery. 

Recorder Publishing Co., 516 Commer- 
cial. 

Roesch, Louis Co., 321-25 Sansome. 

Rooney, J. V. Co., 1308 Mission. 

Samuel, Wm„ 411% California. 

San Francisco Newspaper Union, 405-407 
Sansome. 

Schreiber, P. H., 809 Mission. 

Shanly, J. M., 414 Clay. 

Smyth, Owen H., 511 Sacramento. 

Spaulding, Geo. & Co., 414 Clay. 

Springer & Co., 240 Ellis. 

Stanley-Taylor Co., 656 Missio n. 

Standard Printing Co.. 51 8Clay. 

Sterett Co., W. I., 933 Market. 

Sterling Press, 229 Stevenson. 

Stuetzel & Co., 144 Second. 

Sunset Press., 1327 Market. 

Sutter Press, The, 240 Stockton. 

Tomoye Press, 144 Union Square av. 

Town Talk Printing Co., 146 Second. 

Turner, H. S., 3232 Mission. 

Valleau & Peterson, 410 Sansome. 

Wale Printing Co., 621 Clay. 

Werner, Geo. A., 1067 Howard. 

Western Fine Arts Co., 529 Clay. 

Williams, Joseph, 142 Sevents. 

Wilson, Geo. F., 405 Front. 

Winkler, Chas. W., 146 Second. 

Winterburn, Jos., 417 Clay. 

Woodward, W. A. & Co.. 12 Sutter. 
BOOKBINDERS. 

Althof & Bahls, 524 Sacramento. 

Brown & Power Co., 508 Clay. 

Buswell & Co., 536 Clay. 

California Bookbinding and Printing Co., 
28 First. 

Crocker, H. S. Co., 217 Bush. 

McGreeney, Wm. H., 23 Stevenson. 

Hicks-Judd Co., 21-23 First. 

Kitchen, Jr., Co., 510-514 Commercial. 

Levison Printing Co., 514 Sacramento. 

Mclntyre, J. B., 424 Sansome. 

Malloye. F., 422 Sacramento. 

Mysell-Rollins Co., 22 Clay. 

Phillips Bros., 505 Clay. 

Rotermundt, Hugo L., 413 Sacraemnto. 

Webster, Fred. L., 19 First. 

Whelan. Richard I. & Co., 42 Steuart. 

San Francisco Mailing Co., 609 Mission, 
5th Floor. 

PHOTO-ENGRAVERS AND ETCHERS. 

Barnhart & Swasey, 107 New Montgom- 
ery. 

Bolton & Strong, 621 Clay. 

California Engraving Co., 506 Market. 

San Francisco Etching Co., 109 New 
Montgomery. 

McCabe & Sons, 611 Merchant. 

Sierra Engraving Co., 324 Grant av. 

Sunset Engraving Co., 108 Union Square 
av. 

Union Engraving Co., 144 Union Square 
av. 

Yosemite Engraving Co., 24 Montgom'y. 

ELECTROTYPERS AND STEREOTYP- 
ERS. 

American Press Association, 19 First. 

Hoffschneider Bros., 412 Commercial. 

Martin & Co., 508 Clay. 




STEER 
reii THE ST9UE 

TiW &lls 

Union Made 

Blue: Flannel 
Overshirte 

ANO 

Flannel Underwear 
DfNAND r "<BQAND 



General News. 



SCANDINAVIAN AMERICAN SAVINGS BANK 

Cor. Bush and Montgomery Sts. (Mills Building) 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Capital, $300,000. Total Assets, $1,000,000 

Directors Advisory Board 



Charles Nelson 
Lewis I. Cowgill 
J. C. Eschen 
Geo. H. Tyson 



E. W. Ferguson 
Fr. C. Siebe 
Mikal Olsen 



J. Jensen 

A. T. Dunbar 

J. C. Everding 



Martin Sanders 

W. H. Little 

Henry Wilson 

S. D. Denson, Attorney 
Saving Accounts Solicited. Commercial deposits subject to check. Inter- 
est paid on savings and commercial balances, and allowed from date of de- 
posit. Drafts, Telegraphic Exchange and Letters of Credit issued, payable 
in New York, London, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and all the prin- 
cipal cities of Europe and America. Open Saturday evenings from 6:30 to 8, 
for deposits. 




Notice! Notice! 
REMOVED 

THE UNITED STATES 
WATCH CLUB 

9 SPEAR ST., Buckley Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Merchant Tailor 

REMOVED TO 

9 Spear Street, Buckley Bldg. 

PHONE MONTGOMERY 1242 

SAN FRANCISCO 



^^^B^^ 


SUM Wri- » 

■HI % % 

i \ 


PKH I fir 



The Scandinavian 
Sailors' Home 

Cor. Drumm and Commercial Sts. 

Telephone James 4846. 

A new building erected especially for sail- 
ors. Latest improvements, clean and light 
rooms, bath, reading and dining rooms. 
First-class board and lodging at reasonable 
rates. Gospel service — Sundays, 3:45 p. m., 
and Wednesdays, 8 o'clock p. m. All wel- 



<•< mi i- 



A. ANDERSON 

Missionary and Manager. 



Former Congressman Jerry Simpson 
died at Wichita, Kas., on October 23, 
aged 63 years. 

Formal expressions of thanks by the 
Czar and tin- .Mikado to President Roose- 
velt for his part in the recent peace ne- 
gotiations have been made public by the 
State Department. 

The Japanese Government will ask the 
Diet to authorize an increase of seven 
divisions in the .Japanese army to qualify 
the nation to fulfil] the terms of the 
British agreement. 

Prince Charles of Denmark is reported 
to have chosen the title, King Haakon 
VII, under which to reign in Norway. 
Haakon VI was the last independent 
Norwegian King. ITc died in 1380. 

The evacuation of Manchuria by the 
Japanese is being actively carried on and 
troops are arriving daily at various ports. 
General Kuroki is expected at Tokio, 
Japan, by the middle of November. 

Mr. Rockhill, United States Minister 
to China, has sent an Imperial proclama- 
tion to the State Department which is 
taken to show that China is sincere in its 
efforts to stop the boycott of American 
goods. 

In September the imports of gold into 
Great Britain were £2,967,000, a decrease 
of £466,000, and the exports were £4,- 
446,000, an increase of £2,568,000. Of 
this increase £1,429,000 went to France 
and £658,000 to the United States. 

The negotiations for the new Russian 
loan are proceeding favorably. The 
amount is practically fixed at $250,000,- 
000. The international bankers are ap- 
parently relieved by the knowledge that 
Count Witte will be the head of the Gov- 
ernment. 

Professor Korn in a lecture before the 
Electro-Technical Association at Munich, 
Germany, has claimed that the problem 
of transmiting photographs by telegraph 
has been solved in principle, and it was 
now possible to transmit a photograph or 
sketch six inches square in from ten to 
twenty minutes. 

A meting held at Santiago de Chile on 
October 22 to petition the Government to 
abolish the import tax on Argentine cat- 
tle degenerated into a most serious riot, 
owing to the absence of the troops, who 
were engaged in maneuvers two days ' 
march from the capital. The police, who 
were unable to maintain order, charged 
the crowd and killed ten persons and 
wounded hundreds. 

Information reaching the highest quar- 
ters at Paris shows that different ar- 
rangements have been made by which 
Prince Charles of Denmark will accept 
the throne of Norway, following a 
plebiscite on November 17. Prince 
Charles will leave Denmark to assume the 
royal functions immediately after the no- 
tification of his election is conveyed to 
him. 

According to the latest statement of 
the Interstate Commerce Commission for 
the last fiscal year, the total number of 
passengers killed in train accidents was 
350; passengers injured in train acci- 
dents, 6498. The total number of em 
ployes killed in train accidents was 798 ; 
injured, 7052. There were 187 passen- 
gers killed in other than train accidents 
and 3563 injured and 2463 employes 
killed in other than train accidents, and 
38,374 injured; a grand total of all 
classes of 537 passengers killed and 10,- 
040 injured and 3261 employes killed and 
45,426 injured. This shows an increase 
nt 117 passengers killed and 1963 injur- 
ed and a decrease of 106 employes lulled 
and an increase of 2160 employes injur- 
ed. There were 6224 collisions during 
the year, with a money loss of $4,849,- 
054, and 5371 derailments, with a monej 
[OSS Of $4,862,602, a total of 11,595 col- 
lisions and derailments and a total 
money loss of $9,711,656 being done by 
damage to cars, engines and roadways. 



V2 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's WorKers. 



The street-ear lines of Moscow, Russia, 
resumed operations on October 16, and 
the workmen of many factories which 
had been closed by the strike returned to 
work. 

Forty thousand New Zealand workers 
have petitioned the Government to im- 
pose a 40 per cent, duty on Americas 
Harvester Company machinery of kinds 
made in New Zealand. The farmers, o